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By Jessica Brister On 12 Oct, 2015 At 11:24 PM | Categorized As Featured, Reviews | With 1 Comment

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Science fiction horror movies have gotten a bad rap over the years. Amazing movies such as Event Horizon and Pandorum have gotten poor reviews, and I’m not quite sure why. Maybe it’s because people just don’t like the genre? Or, maybe people just don’t understand that there are deep, overarching themes within the futuristic technology and settings? I’m not sure, but I do know that there is a little-know sci-fi horror movie called Infini that got a very similar reception. That’s a shame because it’s a really well-done movie which I would recommend to any sci-fi movie fanatic.


Infini is a 2015 Australian sci-fi horror film. It is directed by Shane Abbess and stars Daniel MacPherson as Whit Carmichael. The movie is set in the 23rd century, where there are deep space mining colonies that are responsible for a large chunk of the Earth’s economy. To get to these colonies, people use a form of teleportation called “slip streaming” that gives them almost instant access to far away places, though there is a lot of time dilation. Carmichael is on his first day of being on a search and rescue team (SAR) for these colonies when another team sent to mining station O.I. Infini comes back in a crazed rage, as some biohazard has come back with them. In order to avoid at lethal quarantine, Carmichael does a “dirty jump” to Infini while the rest of his team is killed. Another team is dispatched to retrieve him and figure out what exactly went on in the colony.

The movie is solid science fiction. The premise seems like it could actually happen. Add the suspense of rage-induced “zombie-like” foes, great acting, and an eery setting, and you have yourself a great sci-fi horror movie. Infini is not the scariest film that I’ve ever seen. That’s not the point of it. The movie is more blood and guts with a focus on how humanity reacts in a certain dire situation. It’s also not the most original film. Infini feels like a mash-up of Event Horizon, Pandorum, and the Dead Space franchise with a little bit of Aliens and Resident Evil thrown in. However, it has enough original elements to keep it interesting, and it was well-executed.


Many big-budget films focus too much on special effects. While that can be an important element in sci-fi horror, it’s the pacing, characters, tone, and theme that make the movie. Infini did not have that kind of a budget, but what they had they used well. Honestly, when I first watched it (yes, it merited watching a couple of time for me), I didn’t even realize that this was some indie movie from Australia. The setting was excellent, and it created a prefect tone for the movie. For me, though, it was the characters and theme that really shined. Science fiction should make you view issues that you normally wouldn’t want to discuss in a different way. I thought Infini did an excellent job of that.

Daniel MacPherson really did an amazing job as the lead. His character both looked like and acted like Commander Shepard (Mass Effect), which I absolutely loved. The viewer ends up both caring for and liking him as his leadership qualities show through, even though he is working with a different team and has many issues with them. I wanted Carmichael to desperately get home because of his pregnant wife and how much the character seemed to care for her.


The supporting cast were quite good as well. From Grace Huang as Claire Grenich to Luke Hemsworth as Charlie Kent, they added a unique and interesting feel to the movie. Obviously many of the characters aren’t as well-developed as Whit Carmichael, but they don’t need to be as the focus is on Carmicheal’s character. I particularly liked Luke Ford’s character as Chester Huntington and Harry Pavlidis’ character as Harris Menzies because they were probably the more developed supporting characters and could relate more to Carmichael as they both had children they wanted to get home to.

If you love good, solid science fiction horror movie, I highly recommend Infini. It isn’t a perfect movie (what is, really?), but it’s entertaining and will make you think. I was delighted to come across this movie on Netflix. It is currently (as of 10/12/15 in the U.S.) free for you to watch from there if you have a subscription. I say take a chance. You will probably love it.

By Kenesu On 9 Oct, 2015 At 06:41 PM | Categorized As Featured, ROG News | With 0 Comments

No GravatarBandaii Namco Entertainment Europe recently announced that in partnership with ESL Arena, The Tekken 7 World Arcade Championship Europe Qualifiers will be held at Paris Game Week. 16 Iron Fist Combatants (5 Top European Players selected by ESL & 7 players who qualified from different Tekken Tournaments within Europe) will compete to decide who amongst the elite will be the 3 best Iron Fist Combatants to be flown out to Japan and have a chance to compete in the Tekken 7 King of Iron Fist World Tournament in December.

With 12 slots already taken, 4 more slots are awaiting fellow Iron Fist Combatants who feel they have what it takes to compete with the best of the best in Tekken 7. All who truly feel they have what it takes will need to prove themselves against like-minded competition at the ESL Arena on Oct. 28th during Paris Game Week. Advance through the competition and earn your spot to be 1 of 16 competing in the World Arcade Championship EU Qualifiers. The World Arcade Championship EU Qaulifers will be held on Oct. 29th.

Prizes & Perks – 1 Round Trip (From a country of European Union) + accommodation (1 night in Paris, France) + 3 meals (Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner) + participation in a live tournament.

The Tournament will played using Madcatz FightSticks only on Tekken 7 Arcade Cabinets (sorry pad players.) Also, if you’re not able to make it out to the event, the tournament WILL be live streamed from ESL Arena’s Twitch so be sure to follow them asap so that you don’t miss any of the action, as this weill definitely be a very intense tournament with high level play demonstrated from high level players putting everything on the line to become the Ultimate Iron Fist Champion

By Jessica Brister On 20 Sep, 2015 At 06:52 PM | Categorized As Featured, Old School Otaku, PC Games, Reviews | With 0 Comments

No GravatarEvery once in awhile there are a few special games that come around and really push the boundaries of what games can be. For me, Tomb Raider II is one of those games. Being the sequel to the extremely popular original Tomb Raider, there were a lot of high expectations the second installment to be even better. Tomb Raider II passed with flying colors to be an entertaining adventure with one of gaming’s most iconic characters.

Tomb Raider II is an action-adventure, puzzle-based game that was the sequel to the original Tomb Raider, which came out in 1996. It was developed by Core Design and published by Eidos Interactive. It was released October of 1997 for PlayStation and PC (it eventually came out for Mac later) and had critical acclaim and sold very well.


The game follows adventurer and tomb raider, Lara Croft. The story revolved around the Dagger of Xian, a weapon that was used by an ancient emperor of China to transform into a dragon and command armies. Monks were able to get a hold of the dagger and keep it hidden within the Great Wall of China. Lara goes to investigate the dagger and realizes that she’s not the only one after it. Marco Bartoli, a man who is obsessed with the dagger, is also digging up artifacts in order to wield the dagger’s power. Lara’s adventure goes to places like China and Italy, where she is pushed to find out more about Bartoli’s plan.

It’s quite a fun story with an Indiana Jones-like adventure to it. Whether it’s driving a boat through Venice or exploring an underwater shipwreck, the game has a delightful entertainment value to it that you only experience with adventure games. However, it’s actually Lara who really shines. Unlike the new direction Crystal Dynamics is going in with the Tomb Raider reboot games, this Lara Croft is strong, confident, and fearless. She pushes herself to the limits as she works against the forces of evil.


The third-person perspective game play improved with Tomb Raider II from the original by adding new weapons and moves, as well as having vehicles, more human enemies, and larger levels. There’s even a level with a snowmobile that is an absolute blast to play. There was also a training level that allowed the player to roam around Lara’s mansion. The best change, however, was the fact that a player didn’t need a save crystal in order to save the game, making complicated jumping puzzles much easier to manage.

The original Tomb Raider franchise was all about exploration and puzzles with some enemies thrown in to keep things fresh. Unfortunately, that is not the case anymore with the reboot, but Tomb Raider II really shines in both instances. Puzzles typically are usually jumping or timing-related, and there is a lot of exploration involved. The levels might not be the huge open-world maps that gamers are used to now, but it’s a lot of fun trying to figure out how to get to certain places or find key items. Shooting is emphasized in Tomb Raider II more than the original, and it features Lara’s signature dual pistols, as well a grenade launcher, and M16 rifle, dual Uzis, and a harpoon gun for underwater fighting. The fighting sequences utilize a jump and dodge system, instead of the sit under cover and shoot. This type of game play is not considered ideal anymore because it’s not very realistic. However, it is super fun.


The only real problem with going back and playing Tomb Raider II is dealing with the outdated graphics. They were really awesome at the time, but the sharp angles and grainy textures are hard to get used to. People who enjoy retro-gaming won’t mind, but it’s glaring for those who prefer modern games. The cut-scenes aren’t bad, but Lara is definitely very square and so are all of the other people. It’s amazing to see how far graphics have come since then.

So, if you want a fun, action-adventure game with an amazing heroine, you might want to play or replay Tomb Raider II. You do have to like puzzles, but that’s half the fun. It was a different game for a completely different time. Sadly, I just don’t think we’re going to get anything quite like it again.


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When Fallout 4 was announced, there were a lot of very excited fans. I was definitely one of them. In the excitement of the announcement, many decided to go back and replay older Fallout games. I was also one of those people. I’ve played Fallout 3 before, but never got a chance to finish it. Going back through and actually beating Fallout 3 sounded like a really good idea. For those who haven’t played it or for those who wanted to hear my take on the game, I’ve decided to do a full review, though it’s a bit belated.


Fallout 3 is a single player, action role playing game that utilizes a huge open world post-apocalyptic setting. It was developed by Bethesda Game Studios and published by Bethesda Softworks. Bethesda had bought the rights to the Fallout series from Black Isle Studios/Interplay Entertainment, so this was Bethesda’s first attempt with the franchise. The game came out in late October of 2008 for PC, PlayStation 3, and Xbox 360. The game got rave reviews across the board and was given Game of the Year in several instances.




The game is set in the same universe as the rest of the earlier Fallout games. It takes place in the year 2277, which is approximately 200 years before the nuclear apocalypse that ravaged the United States. Many citizens ended up in “Vaults” underground that keep them alive during the bombings. The story’s protagonist is a character of the player’s choosing (male/female, looks, etc.) that resides in Vault 101. Things in the vault seem great at first, but after many years go by, events happen that force the protagonist to leave the vault. The wasteland that lies outside of the vault is deadly and full of secrets. As the main character explores the open-world area of what used to be Washington D.C., these secrets start to come to light.


The main story line is quite good. It has everyone that a person could want: family issues, secrets, exploration, evil groups vying for power, monsters, and an altruistic mission. There are many side quests as well that can push a player into playing for long, long time. The map is expansive and the tone really just make you feel like you are in the Capital Wasteland. The urban exploration alone in the game is well worth the price of the game. It was one of the first games that I actually felt overwhelmed over when I looked at the sheer size and scale of it. Once you go out of the vault, it really feels like you can go anywhere and do anything.


The game play is like a first person shooter to a degree. You can play that way if you want. However, the feel is more RPG with XP for kills, completing tasks, and quests. There is also a special combat system called V.A.T.S. (Vault-Tec Assisted Targeting System) that allows a player to pause time and pick special areas to attack on an enemy based on a probability percentage. It’s an interesting system that has a love or hate relationship with many Fallout 3 players. Luckily, you can choose whether you want to use it or not based off of how you want to play the game. This includes how a person levels up their character by choosing points in the S.P.E.C.I.A.L. system, which stands for Strength, Perception, Endurance, Charisma, Intelligence, Agility, and Luck. Players can also choose their way of playing by adding points to “Perks” that at given after leveling up. Want to sneak around and get stuff done that way? There are Perks for that. Want to go in guns-blazing? There are Perks for that. It creates the type of game play that is re-playable many, many times.




The graphics looked pretty slick at the time that the game came out. The opening sequence for the game is probably one of the best in gaming history, as it sets the tone of the game quite nicely and has a really creepy feel to it. The 1950s retro feel with the nuclear apocalypse grays and browns gives the game a unique feeling. It’s one of those games that a player could fall in love with, one of those rare gems that only come around every once in awhile.


I completely understand why it was hailed as Game of the Year from many places. It’s a great game, hands down. However, because of its age, the game play feels a bit stiff, and the Gamebryo game engine just wasn’t quite up to par with what it needed to do. The gray and brown color scheme makes hours and hours of play a little bland after awhile (it looks like this fixed for Fallout 4; there are a lot of more colorful game footage out). Regardless, though, it’s an amazing game. It’s definitely worth a play or replay before Fallout 4 comes out.
By Jessica Brister On 22 Aug, 2015 At 05:43 PM | Categorized As Featured, Mobile Gaming, Portable/Mobile Gaming, Reviews | With 0 Comments

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If you were like me, you were delighted to hear at E3 that Bethesda Softworks had a free gaming app called Fallout Shelter. It sounded like a cool diversion before Fallout 4 came out. Then the Android users got a slap in the face: Fallout Shelter would only be immediately available for iOS. Yeah, as an Android user, I was a bit bitter. Yes, I know it’s a free app that Bethesda totally didn’t have to do, but I wanted to play it right then and there. It was a bit of a disappointment. However, the app is finally out for Android, and I have been playing it a lot. Apparently, so have a lot of other people. I wanted to love the game, but there is one major thing that I don’t like about it that have pretty much stopped me from playing it altogether.

Fallout Shelter is addicting, but it has one major downfall.

Fallout Shelter is addicting, but it has one major downfall.

Fallout Shelter is fun. Don’t get me wrong. It’s addicting. It’s clever. There is a lot right about it.

When I first started to play it, the game really reminded me of Sim Tower (anyone else remember that game?). The player is responsible as a vault’s Overseer to keep the place and people in order. You start off with a few dwellers and try to increase that number as well as manage resources and keep people happy. The three most important resources are power, food, and water which are harvested by placing certain rooms in the vault and having the dwellers work them. Of course, building rooms cost caps. To get more caps, a player must either level up the dwellers, successful rush a room (speed up the resource gathering process), send dwellers out to the wasteland, or complete objectives.

When objectives are achieved, they sometimes give out lunchboxes. These lunchboxes give out a few cards that award extra resources, outfits that raise dweller stats, special characters, weapons, or extra caps. At first, the objectives are easy, and players can easily get several lunchboxes. After awhile, though it gets harder and harder to get the goodies. Extra lunchboxes can be bought through in-app purchases.

Dwellers also have SPECIAL stats (just like in the actual Fallout games). Putting certain dwellers with certain stats will make material collection and successful room rushes easier. A player can increase a dweller’s stats by adding rooms that can train them. Players also need to keep an eye on the happiness level of the vault dwellers, since that can affect their performance. Happiness can be raised by rushing rooms or things like…making babies. Of course, besides worrying about the basic resources and happiness levels, there are also issues with radiation, rad-roaches, and raiders. Add a slick-looking color scheme and the retro 1950s Fallout-style, and you get a really awesome app.

Rushing a room unsuccessfully can be disastrous.

Rushing a room unsuccessfully can be disastrous.

It’s actually one of the best game apps I’ve played on Android. So you may be wondering to yourself, “If you think it’s a great app, why were you disappointed? Why did you stop playing it?” Well, there is one major thing that has forced me to stop playing altogether, and that is…

It’s so demanding that it’s ten times worse than a Tamigotchi. If you don’t know what that is, I’m sorry, but your childhood was not awesome.

Okay, I may be kidding on that one, but seriously, the game is demanding on a level that I haven’t experienced since I had this thing in Middle School:

Yes, I have saved this thing for the last (almost) twenty years.

Yes, I have saved this thing for the last (almost) twenty years.

The game cannot be minimized for too long because things will still keep going, even if you aren’t actively playing. I can understand that if it’s just running in the background, though that is still annoying. However, I have completely shut down the game and turned my tablet off, and when I get back on, the happiness level of my vault has dropped from the 90% range to the teens and most of my resources are gone. The game is unfortunately focused too much on real-time. It’s not an app that you can casually play. It demands a lot of attention, which is why I have dubbed the game “Tamagotchi on Steriods.” This means that if you want to be successful as an Overseer, don’t go to sleep and don’t stop playing.

I wish that the game would actually pause, but it’s too focused on real-time play. If Bethesda would fix this, it would be the best gaming app I’ve ever seen. However, unless they do, I just can’t play it anymore. It was taking over all of my time. That’s not something that I wanted in an app, something I I may play on occasion when I’m sitting at the doctor’s office or when I’m nursing my daughter. Let’s hope that we can actually pause Fallout 4. *Tee-Hee*


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If you’ve read reviews of the Elder Scrolls Online: Tamriel Unlimited, you might have already decided to give the game a pass. In fact, if you look on Metacritic, it scores just a 73 (out of 100) for critics and an 8.0 for the user score. It sounds like a fairly mediocre game and one that just could be skipped. However, that is far from the truth. The game is excellent. Apparently, there are just a very vocal bunch of people on the Internet who hate fun. Here is what the game is really like:


The Elder Scrolls Online is an MMO (massively multiplayer online) action role-playing game. Though it has been out for Windows and Mac since April 2014, it has just come out for PlayStation 4 and Xbox One in June of this year. Initially, the game had a subscription fee, but that was dropped March of this year, and the game was re-branded to The Elder Scrolls Online: Tamriel Unlimited for the PS4 and Xbox One release. The game was developed by ZeniMax Online Studios and published by Bethesda Softworks.

The events in Tamriel Unlimited happen a thousand years before The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim. Though ESO happens in the Elder Scrolls universe, don’t expect it to be like Skyrim or Oblivion. ESO is its own deal that just happens to be in the Elder Scrolls universe. Yes, you get the fun and in-depth lore of the Elder Scrolls and the cool races and settings, but it’s completely different in feel. The plot still is similar to Skyrim with an all-powerful being trying to take over the world with a bunch of groups fighting for power in the meantime. If you were looking for a super-deep story, then this game probably isn’t for you. If you were looking for a “social Skyrim,” then this a game isn’t for you. If you were looking for a World of Warcraft clone, then this game is definitely not for you.

However, if you like fun, this game is for you. If you want a great social game, this game is for you. If you want a lot of content, then this game is for you. In reality, if you don’t try to make this game something its not, then you will have an absolutely blast. ESO shines on its game play, expansive setting, and extensive content.

Though there is a main quest line, the quests—like other Elder Scrolls games—go in whatever order you want at whatever time you want. This allows the player massive amounts of freedom to do whatever he or she wants to, and this is crucial for an MMO. For those who want to play solo, there are tons and tons of quests. In fact, there are so many solo quests that I haven’t even scratched the surface yet, and I have been playing for weeks. For those who really want to get the most of out an MMO, there are group dungeons, public events, flourishing guilds, and a lot of PVP action. Not only that, but the place is thriving. An MMO is as only as good as the people in it, and at least for now, ESO has a mass following with die-hard followers.


Besides a thriving community, a lot of quests, a cool PVP area, and a lot of cooperative play, the Elder Scrolls Online also contains:

  • An amazing crafting system for weapons, armor, enchantments, potions, and food.
  • Three factions that players can choose to be in which compete against each other in different aspects.
  • Easily trade items between your other characters or with other people or guilds.
  • Customize gear with racial motifs or dye stations.
  • Utilize different mounts, vanity pets, lore books, and racial motifs to customize your experience.
  • Demonstrate tons of emotes to make your character dance, wave, or do the most absolute silly things (take THAT Destiny).
  • Run dungeons with either a group of friends or random people.
  • Contribute to public battles.
  • Participate in guilds for social aspects and trading.
  • A huge map area with tons of places to explore.
  • Switch between first and third person perspective.
  • Four play-style classes to choose from.

It really is a complete blast to play. Though the graphics are not the most beautiful of this generation, they look good enough, especially for an MMO that is so expansive. I think most players would take better game play over the latest, greatest slick graphics.

So, overall, if you are looking for a social game that is just plain fun, the Elder Scrolls Online is for you. Yes, there are some in-game purchases that you can make, but you get more than a full game with just the base game. Although, you will probably get addicted to it like me and upgrade a few things.

Seriously. I am thoroughly hooked on ESO, and I don’t say that about a lot of games.

By Koji Ford On 18 Jul, 2015 At 02:24 PM | Categorized As Animation, Featured, Reviews | With 0 Comments

No GravatarIt’s four o’clock in the morning. I should be sleeping, but my mind won’t stop buzzing. The only sound you can hear is the sounds of rapid typing as my hands shake from the overload of caffeine. I tell myself, “I need to get some sleep,” as I type in the URL for Crunchyroll in search of a good anime. There’s been some buzzing going about the Tumblrverse that a certain anime has come swooping in and grabbing the attention of many pastel-cute bloggers, and I decided to investigate.  I prepared strawberries for a snack and a couple of water bottles for the binge watching session. I was ready. I turned out the lights, plugged in my headset, cranked the volume up to eleven (yes, it goes to eleven), and pressed play.

Right away I’m greeted by cherry blossoms drifting through the air and a soft tune.  Three girls stood before me in school uniform. Then, singing. The camera pans upwards onto the singers face, and the next thing you know the previously soft tune turns into an up beat poppy melody as the girl runs towards the camera and throws off her school jacket. Was there a point in doing that? I don’t know. All I know is that the sun is peeking through my window, and I can hear colors. Anyway, the camera starts twirling around in circles as the young lady continues to run across the street towards it, then she jumps over some stairs, freeze framing. How does she plan on landing that jump? What was the point in that? Was she so filled with joy that the consequence of jumping over a set of stairs and injuring herself not phase her? Kids these days. That’s when her monologue starts. She introduces herself as Honoka Kosaka, a second year high school student. She goes on to tell how her school, Otonokizaka High School, is in trouble and will be closing down as the camera shows a shot of the three girls from earlier (including Honoka) surround the billboard with the official statement of school closure…or something official like that. All three look horrified, and Honoka falls backwards fainting, claiming her life as a high school student is over. I mean I guess I can relate; if something I  enjoyed and spent most of my life doing that had no effect on my skills as a person whatsoever suddenly came to a stop I’d be devastated.


What’s better than gals being pals?

And that’s when the intro started.

The intro was the silent messenger that informed me, “Koji, this anime is going to ruin your life,” as cute high school girls danced around a stage and sang. I was captivated by a particular short haired girl who came across as the tomboy of the group. At this point I’m so sleep deprived and running on so much caffeine my head felt light and heavy at the same time, and my eye wouldn’t. Stop. Twitching. But no. I must watch this anime, as a service to my country. I downed my fifth cup of coffee, and continued to watch. The intro ends, and the sudden urge to purchase Nenderoids of the girls came to me, but it was such a small urge at the time that I was able to shake it off. The episode continues as Honoka awakens in the nurses office, brushing off the encounter with the school notice as a dream and skips merrily down the hallway while her fellow classmates look on in concern. She then finds herself back where she fainted, in front of the notice board, and exclaims in disbelief. Later on, her friends start plotting a way to gather enough attention to the school so that more students want to enroll there. She goes home, unsure of what to do, when she notices a pamphlet for a popular school among young girls called UTX. She then takes it upon herself to visit the school, where she’s greeted by a massive display of three girls greeting the new coming students. The girls on the display, as it turns out, are school idols, students that partake in the activity of song and dance while gaining immense popularity on the internet. It was then that Honoka decided that’s what her school needed, and runs off to find her friends.


Throughout the first season of the show Honoka, Kotori, and Umi recruit various girls for their idol group, Muse, further gaining popularity on the internet and thus having more students enroll in their school as well as competing in live competitions. Now, my opinion on this anime is as follows; it has ruined my life and I cannot stop talking about it, 10/10 would recommend it. But beware: it gets a little gay sometimes and one of them likes to casually grope the other members boobs. So if you’re not into girls being platonic and gropey and just a little gay with each other, I wouldn’t watch it. But if you’re like me and love girls in platonic close friendships, then watch it. Sure, the ending made me cry, but at least I have this Rin Hoshizora body pillow to talk about it to, and this Nozomi Tojo Nenderoid to stare at. Oh, by the way, they also have a smartphone game called School Idol Project that, if you’re into rhythm games, I highly recommend. I myself can’t get a hang of the hard levels, but maybe after I actually fall asleep and sleep off this caffeine I can finally feel my hands well enough to play it. They also have a movie premiering in various theaters across the country, so if you’re interested in that click here.

I guess that’s the end of my first review, I hope you all enjoyed it. I’m going to pass out now.

Peace out.


No GravatarEvery once in awhile, a very special game comes along and confirms that there are still indeed wonderful games out there.  The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt is one of those gems.  It is a definite “must have” for any RPG fan.

The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt is a third-person, action RPG with an expansive open world environment.  It was developed and published by Polish studio CD Projekt RED.  The game is based on the a set of fantasy novels by Polish author,  Andrzej Sapkowski (these books are available in an English translation).  The game came out in May of this year for PC, PlayStation 4, and XBox One.


The story follows Geralt of Rivia, a witcher who takes care of people’s monster problems for coin.  Those who become witchers have been mutated and have special powers such as a special sensing ability and limited magic powers.  He is searching for his adopted daughter, Ciri, who is in danger from being captured by the Wild Hunt.  The main quest line is compelling and interesting.  It also has a bit of a Mass Effect quality to it, since Geralt’s choices do affect the outcome of the story.  The side quests are fun to play and range from playing gwent with certain people (more on this later), getting rid of monsters, and helping people out.  The sheer amount of side quests can be a bit daunting.  It feels like every time a quest is finished, five more are available.  This is not a bad thing, though.  A player could spend full price on the game, and it is definitely worth its price.

The game play is quite a lot of fun.  It’s a well-done third person perspective game.  The combat system is excellent.  Geralt uses swords and a bit of magic to keep the monsters at bay.  He has two swords: one for human foes and a silver one for monsters and such.  Witchers can cast magic by making signs, which vary from blasting things for flames to influencing people’s minds.  There is also an amazing crafting system for both weapons and potions.  Weapons and clothes can be upgraded by finding materials and schematics around the world.  Potions can be created in the same way.  Players may upgrade abilities by either leveling up Geralt’s character or finding places of power, which give extra allotment points.

The open world is expansive.  A player can spend hours and hours just exploring.  Geralt moves around throughout the land on his horse, Roach and by boat.  The world has its own weather system and goes through a day/night cycle.  Depending on the time of day can actually affect the powers of particular monsters (think: werewolves and such).  The world can range from quaint orchards, to buggy swamps, to massive cities.  It’s amazing to explore.

The mini game in The Witcher 3 is probably one of the best-done ones yet.  Gwent is a strategy card game that Geralt plays with the merchants and inn-keepers, and there’s a lot of strategy to it.  The game involves three rounds.  The person who wins two obviously wins the game.  Everyone brings their own deck, so finding and winning more cards is also a strategy.  This encourages the player to hunt for more cards either by buying or winning them in high-stakes games.


An open world would not be decent unless it had amazing graphics, and the Witcher 3 delivers.  There are surprisingly great.  The best graphics in the games are the cut-scenes; they are absolutely gorgeous.  The in-game graphics are amazing as well, and actually focus on colors.  There are little bits and pieces of detail everywhere from the weather to Geralt’s growing beard.  A player actually needs to see a barber because the beard will start to grow after a certain amount of time.

The Witcher 3 is an absolutely must-have.  Hands-down.  Get it now if you don’t have it.  Obviously, it is an adult game (there are some really raunchy parts).  But overall, the game is just amazing.  It really should get game of the year for 2015.  However, with Fallout 4 coming out in the fall, The Witcher 3 may be dethroned as game of the year.


No GravatarI always have to shake my head a bit when someone compares another game to Skyrim and says something like, “It’s just like Skyrim.”  Really?  It is “just like” Skyrim?  I’ll then start to question them to see what they really mean.  This is the line of questioning that I go through with them:

Is it open world? (Note that this is one of the only questions that they say yes to.)

Will it take you an hour or more to walk from one side of the map to the other?

Is it an action RPG?

Is it first-person point of view with the option of going to third person?

Do you level up an ability by using that ability?

Do you have to pick a certain character type (i.e. mage or warrior)?  Or can you have multiple talents?

Is the game set in a high-fantasy realm?

Can you choose between being a male of female character?

Do you have the choice of multiple races to play?

Does it have hundreds and hundreds of hours of quests?

Does it have a weapons and amour crafting system?

Is the open world interactive with both NPCs and items?

Do you get to have followers who help you?

Can you pick and choose who you’d like to be your follower?

Is the game background and setting intricate and in-depth?

Are there hundreds of areas to explore?

Is there a huge modding community for PC that puts out amazing mods all of the time?

Is the game so beloved that there are tons of memes and jokes of it all around the Internet?

Is the game the yard stick that other games are measured by?  (Because Skyrim is.)

There, of course, are games similar to Skyrim, but there is nothing “just like” it.  The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt gets some things close.  Far Cry 4 also does the same.  It was described as “Skyrim with guns.”  But is there really a true comparison?  Not really.  Not even the Fallout series is actually the same because of the way the leveling system works.   I don’t necessarily mind comparisons, but when people make statements that include “just like,” it gets me a little riled up because in the end, The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim is one of the most defining games of this decade.  And that is why it is so beloved.




No GravatarFallout 4 stole the show at Bethesda’s E3 conference by demonstrating amazing open-world gameplay with a classic-style Fallout feel and a crazy amount of weapon customizations.

Todd Howard, Game Director at Bethesda Game Studios, exclaimed that, “In the world of entertainment, there are a very few things as good as Fallout.”  And perhaps, he is right.


He noted that Bethesda has started working on the game for many years when the team started designing for Fallout 4 right after the third installment came out in 2009.  The team at Bethesda has been working on it vigorously for the last four years.

“It all starts with an obsession for detail,” Howard noted.  He was indeed right because the preview that was given for Fallout 4 was indeed full of specific details.

First of all, there is a new concentration on the world that existed before Fallout.  This included a very retro 1950s-feel.  Though this is pushed throughout the previous Fallout games, it is interesting to see how things were before the bombs.


Howard also showed a new way to create a character.  Think “Sims 4” because it is all about drag and sculpt.  Gone are the tedious sliders.  Instead, a player just needs to click and sculpt each part.  Players can play as either male or female, and the character’s baby will actually generate based off of how the parents look.  One also has a large choice of baby names as well for the child because Bethesda recorded thousands of the most popular names with the voice actors.


The basic plot of the game is that the character goes into Vault 111 right before the bombs and awakens as the sole survivor of the vault 200 years later.  The setting is confirmed for the Boston area.

The focus of the game is still “go anywhere, do anything” player freedom with the most ambitious map done by Bethesda to date.  Players can play either in first person or 3rd person.  They even get a German Shepherd that can be commanded to do things by pointing and telling.  The V.A.T.S. system is back as well, and so is the Pip Boy, which has gotten a bit of an overhaul.  There’s even mini games in the Pip Boy to play.


Die-hard Fallout fans will be delighted to know that they can get their own Pip Boy that works with a smart phone with the Fallout 4 Pip Boy Edition.  There will be an app that can be downloaded which will make the device look like a real Pip Boy screen.

“As far as stupid gimmicks goes, this is the best f***ing one that I have ever seen,” Howard quipped about the real-life Pip Boy.

The Pip Boy Edition will retail at $119.99 and the Pip Boy app will be for iOS and Android.

Fallout 4 will also feature a completely optional the Sims-style building tool that will allow players to build houses and settlements.  Players will be able to scrap items in the world to build whatever they want in real time.  The emphasis is on making the game into a complete experience and doing what a player wants to do.  Players will be able to build generators for power and defense items such as turrets to protect against raiders.  Brahmin cattle can even be run between settlements.


The game’s crafting system carries over to other parts of the game with an extensive weapon-building system.  Thousands of items can be modified.  There are fifty base weapons and seven hundred modifications that can be made to them.  Armor can also be modified.

Fallout 4 comes out November 11, 2015 and will be available for PC, XBox One, and PlayStation 4.



REAL OTAKU GAMER is using WP-Gravatar