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By Jessica Brister On 29 Apr, 2016 At 08:32 PM | Categorized As Editorials, Featured, ROG Humor | With 0 Comments
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No GravatarAfter talking to many gamers and comparing gaming experiences with them, I have noticed a trend with a certain portion of the gamer population.  I see it with some people’s posts on Google+ and tweets on Twitter.  I have discussed this with a few of you at length.  You see, there are a few of us (me included) that have what I like to call “Gaming OCD.”  This type of OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder) may affect the following areas of a person’s gaming life:

*Disclaimer: This is not a real diagnosis or disease.  I am not a doctor.   This article is meant to be humorous.  That’s all.

1.) You must pick up every item you can possibly find in a game, even if you don’t need it.

This compulsion probably started with games like the original Resident Evil, where there was almost no ammo and very few save points. One of the signs of Gamer OCD is the fact that you must find every item you can.  This can become annoying, especially in Bethesda games like Fallout 3 or Skyrim, where weight is a factor.  That’s okay, though.  You will spend an extra hour slowly trudging to a place where you can sell or stash your items.

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Having Gamer OCD in games like Skyrim can be a bit annoying, as there is a compulsion to pick up everything and do everything.

2.) You have to go through levels perfectly.

This sign shows up especially in sneak games like the Metal Gear Solid franchise or other games like The Last of Us, where screwing up even a little bit can cost you ammo or other items.  You will re-start an encounter until do you things perfectly.  Even a small screw-up will drive you nuts.

3.) You have to find all of the secrets, no matter how annoying it gets.

Secret items are often used in games so that gamers can get more out of the game play.  From secret treasure in the Uncharted series, to infusions and extra voxophones in BioShock Infinite, to finding a particular roaming monster in Borderlands 2 that will drop a specific weapon, secrets are a large part of gaming.  However, many use this as optional fun.  OCD gamers have a compulsion to find all of them.  A subset of this group may even use walkthroughs just to make sure they found every secret or area.

4.) You have to completely clear areas, do every side mission, and every quest.

Remember in the original Doom how one had the percentage of monsters killed?   Or in Infamous franchise how one could clear districts completely?  Well, people with Gamer OCD must complete all of the areas.  Leaving baddies behind or areas to clear is not an option.  If you are into RPGs or games with extra side missions or quests, you feel like you have no completed the game unless all of those side missions or quests are completed.

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Feel like you ever need to clear the map every time you play a game? You may have Gamer OCD!

5.) Your character must be the highest level possible.

Whether it be the ranking system in the Call of Duty franchise, to perfecting a character in an RPG, to increasing skill levels in The Sims, people with Gamer OCD must have the highest level character possible with all of the bells and whistles.  Their character must have access to every skill and weapon possibility and must be a complete beast in specs.  Although many gamers like to do this, people with gaming OCD take it to the next level and may create multiple characters that are like this and will take the extra time and effort to get their character leveled as high as possible.

6.) You must get all of the trophies.

I’ve seen this a lot from #PS4share.  Gamers do enjoy getting trophies for accomplishments in the games that they play.  However, an OCD gamer feels the need to get one hundred percent trophies across the board on all of his or her games.  A game is not complete unless all of the trophies have been won.

When you have Gamer OCD, getting all of the trophies is mandatory.

When you have Gamer OCD, getting all of the trophies is mandatory.

So what are OCD gamers to do?

Well, if you are like me and haven’t finished a Bethesda RPG because you have to do every side quest and take every item in the game, then it may be okay to tell yourself to let go a bit.  Perfection isn’t always attainable, right?  However, I will say that OCD gamers probably get the most bang for the buck when it comes to our video games.  We spend more time than most per game because of it, so happy gaming everyone!

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No GravatarThe Final Fantasy franchise is beloved by many gamers.  They have fallen in love with the characters, the music, and the worlds of this popular series.  When Final Fantasy XIII came out, many were expecting something wonderful.  Instead, fans got the worst game of the series and possibly one of the worst AAA titles of the generation.  Here is what went wrong with FF XII:

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Final Fantasy XIII was released on December 17, 2009 in Japan and in 2010 worldwide as a straight-forward RPG.  It was developed and published by Square Enix for PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 (the game was eventually released for PC as well).  It was widely criticized because of the game’s linear game play and storyline, while most western RPGs had gone toward open world.  However, there were other issues with the game as well.

The story itself was extremely hard to follow.  I actually still don’t quite understand it.  From what I gathered, a world called Cocoon and it’s government, Sanctum, is basically committing genocide of people who have come in contact with the world below Cocoon called Pulse.  The main character, Lightning, has a moral epiphany and decides to fight back with a bunch of others.  There really wasn’t anything to love about the story or even really like.  It was completely bland, and many times confusing.

Unfortunately, the characters were even worse than the story.  They were extremely cheesy, and the dialogue was cringe-worthy.  Here are some actual quotes from the game:

“Heroes don’t run from fights.”

“Mom’s are tough.”

“Hang on, baby.  Your hero’s on the way.”

Even the talents of Troy Baker were wasted on the character of Snow because everything that the character said was dumb (you know I think it’s a bad game when I tell you that Troy Baker couldn’t even salvage anything good in the game).

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The battle system is outdated in style and resembled more of a ’90s RPG where characters take turns fighting each other.  It was a system that actually made my jaw drop when I got into the first battle.  Though the game is a bit older, that sort of style has died off for AAA titles.  For a “modern” RPG, it felt like a blast from the past, and not in a good way.  When a player meets an enemy, he or she is entered into a “battle system” with change in music and everything.  Each character takes turns attacking the baddie, and if they aren’t attacking, then they sit and dance around in place.  It was very similar to many ’90s retro RPGS.  Though those old games were so much fun, it is quite bizarre for a game in the PlayStation 3/Xbox 360 generation.

Also, the battle system is way too simplistic.  You don’t even have to pay attention while playing the game.  Just hit “X” (playing on PS3).  You’ll kill almost anything that way.  I could train my cats to play this game.  In fact, for the most part, I really wasn’t even playing it.  I was on Twitter, milling around.  The only part of me that was playing the game was my hand, which kept hitting X, X, X, X.  What’s the point of even playing if the game is that easy?  I didn’t really even seem like a true leveling system.

Unlike most modern RPGs, I was limited basically going in a straight line throughout the maps.  The whole thing felt claustrophobic.  And it never got any better!  I kept on thinking: Well maybe if I go along a little farther, the map will open up a bit, and I can actually do some exploring.  Nope!  It never happened.  For a game that came out to PS3 in late 2009, this is actually embarrassing.  I’ve played Call of Duty campaign modes that were more open than this game.  I can’t believe that Square Enix thought that this would be okay, considering FFXII (for the freaking PS2) gave you more freedom.  In fact, every Final Fantasy game I have every played gave you more freedom.  Heck, freaking Pac Man gives you more freedom (at least you don’t have to continuously go straight).

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Another annoying aspect of the game was the sheer amount of cutscenes in the game.  You could barely go five minutes without a cut-scene interrupting.  It was quite obnoxious.  Sure, the cut scenes were pretty, but most of them didn’t feel like they moved the plot.  I’m still scratching my head at what was going on in the game.  In fact, most of them felt like they were just thrown in there to show off the graphics.  Don’t get me wrong.  I enjoy a good cut-scene, but I expect the cut-scenes that I watch to have a point and move the plot.  It shouldn’t just be a graphics show-off.

Sadly, I think that Square Enix is losing touch with what many gamers are demanding from their games now.  At this point, I think that they are focusing on an audience that wants a true JRPG experience.  If that’s the case, go for it.  However, don’t expect any glowing reviews from me.  That’s just not my cup of tea anymore.

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No GravatarJoy Mech Fight, a Japan only Famicom game, was another early attempt at a fighting game from Nintendo. The game took a lot of influence from other fighting game but also Capcom’s Mega Man series. It had 2 scientists who made robots, one scientist went evil and reprogramed the robots except one. The difference in JMF was that after defeating the other robots, they became playable characters, much like story mode unlocks in modern fighting games. The graphics and music were impressive for the time, even as they fought hard against the limitations of the Famicom system ( This was during the transition phase between the 8 bit and 16 bit generations), and while they are not impressive by today’s standards, they were still a technical marvel. The game actually had the largest roster for a fighting game, with 36 characters, until the King of Fighters 98 came out and had 38.

Now there is the question of how to revive it, and to that I say that this is a chance to kill two birds with one stone. There is another game Nintendo was working on for Wii U that seems to have stalled, with no further direction. I refer of course to Project Giant Robot

That game would be perfect to repurpose as a reboot of Joy Mech Fight. It could be the game finally done right, with unique characters that feel like their own character, with the full character shown and not the way they were in the Famicom version with the disembodied limbs. In HD with 3D graphics, this would be an amazing game and if treated right, could be a unique fighting game for Nintendo to have on the NX. The two game concepts seem perfect for each other and would blend well.

Custom characters could be done fantastically in this and the opportunity is there for a variety of modes, such as story ( like in the original), Arcade, Local Multiplayer, Online Multiplayer and Custom Local and Online Multiplayer among others. Nintendo has stated recently that they are unsure of what to do with Project Giant Robot, and retooling it into a reboot of Joy Mech Fight just seems like a perfect way to make this into gold. As for who can make it, perhaps Platinum Games, with their track record of action games and robots in their games. Or maybe Next Level Games, with their unique offbeat games. In the end, whomever makes this, this is too good an opportunity to pass up.

 

 

By Ramon Rivera On 25 Apr, 2016 At 08:57 PM | Categorized As Featured, PlayStation 3/PlayStation 4, Playstation Vita, Reviews, Reviews | With 0 Comments
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No GravatarSo after a long wait, one of the most unique Fighting games ever created has landed on the PS Vita system.  I have to say that this is my first interaction with Skullgirls, and I regret not getting into the Skullgirls hype train sooner.  From the opening movie, to the characters and the deep combo system, I can see the love and dedication that the guys at Lab Zero Games have put in Skullgirls.

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The Story in Skullgirls is really good. “The legends tell of an artifact that can grant any woman’s wish….However, if the woman’s heart is not pure her wish will corrupt her and she will become the Skullgirl.”  To sum it up: Now the current Skullgirl is wreaking havoc.  However, each character reason to fight her and obtain the Skull Heart.  This is what sets them up in their own adventure  In my first play-through, I decided to go straight to the Story Mode and chose Filia.  For whatever reason, Filia felt right to get a taste of the action.  After finishing the Story mode, I felt that something was missing.  It wasn’t something missing from the game, so I decided to go to the Tutorial mode to learn the basics.

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I have to praise Skullgirls for its complete Tutorial mode.  It teaches not only the basics of combat, but it does so with different characters, showing the player the different play styles and combo opportunities.  Another great element found in the Tutorial mode, is the different systems in the game.  One of my favorite inclusions is the Infinite Prevention System (kudos Lab Zero; you did well).  It is a mechanic in which you can escape from an infinite combo, and let me tell you it is a godsend.  One of the reasons I stopped  laying UMVC3 was for the infinite combos.  While they are cool combos, it is frustrating to do nothing to escape from them.  Many times, I just left the controller and waited for the carnage to finish.  With Skullgirls, I don’t have that issue since the combo system operates in a way that when you are in the middle of getting beat down by a large combo, you can use the IPS system to escape from it and do some damage.  However, there are some rules for the IPS to work, but you learn that in the Tutorial.  Another way to escape from devastating combos is the Drama system.  It uses the same principle of the IPS.  However, this is to prevent high damaging infinite combos.  The Drama is represented by a green gauge under your life gauge.  Each time you are getting hurt by a long combo, the Drama gauge starts to fill.  When it is full, you can stop the combo and get a chance to counter attack, making each an enjoyable match that gives the player a chance to win.  Also, the Tutorial mode covers each character specifics and some combos to get you started. Now if you want to master each character, the Trials are for you.  There are four for each character ranging from easy combos to advance combos.  However, the chain combo system allows for interesting combos, so your creativity know no boundaries.

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The Challenge mode is really good as well.  It is a good way to put your skills to the test.  There are twenty-five challenges with different conditions to end them.  Know some combos?  Well, try to beat a character with unlimited Suspense, and you can’t jump.  There are only combos over three hits can damage it.  Add a timer of 60 seconds, and you are set.  Some challenges are brutal but they are manageable at least with some effort.

The online mode is well done.  I was able to find matches really quickly and with no lag whatsoever.  However, I couldn’t know if I was fighting a fellow Vita user or a PS4 user.  Maybe when the lobbies patch releases, this can be fixed.  However, there is nothing game breaking.

The game itself looks amazing.  The art style is so good, and it is a joy to look at.  Each character is so highly detailed and on the PS Vita screen, they look beautiful.  Though everything looks good, there are unfortunately some issues such as some of the text looking blurry and the letters are hard to read sometimes.  The background on each stage is highly detailed, but all of the backgrouns are static (the PS4 version has dynamic backgrounds, so the stages look full of life).  The Vita’s limitation doesn’t allow for them as the developer explained, so while it sucks that they aren’t dynamic, they are good enough.  In all honestly, I almost never look at the stages when I am playing.  One of the things I like the most is how Skullgirls was inspired by many games such as MVC and Street Fighter (love that you can see a “Ryu” in some stages but with Lab Zero unique style).  However, just because they were inspired by them it doesn’t mean that Skullgirls is a clone.  It is a whole different experience, and in my honest opinion, they have won my support for years to come.

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Now the voice acting and the music is top notch. Each character feels alive, and each of the songs get that cool vibe.  For me, playing with headphones is a must.  I also love the subtle references to some fighting games, such as “This is True Love We’re Making”( reference to London Stage in CvS 2), or “Try again Kid”(Sagat all the way). To someone who grew up playing these kinds of games, it is nostalgic to hear and see this references.

Overall, I am pleased the game. The inclusion of all DLC characters is something that makes this the definitive Skullgirls version.  Bottom Line: Skullgirls 2nd Encore is a terrific fighting game.  It is the definitive version, and the Vita port looks and plays beautiful.  With the great voice acting, great music, and a cast of different but peculiar characters (Peacock is something else), I can definitely recommend it to any Vita owner.  As a plus is cross buy with the PS4 version, so you will get the other free.

See the trailer for Skullgirls 2nd Encore for PS Vita below:

 

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Resistance 2 may now seem like a small blip in the world of gaming after so many years, especially since Insomniac pretty much killed the Resistance franchise with the third installment.  However, for those who played Resistance 2, it was a game to be remembered.  It was a follow-up for Resistance: Fall of Man, and everything about it was just right.  Published in late 2008 by Sony, it became one of my favorite first person shooters ever.  Here is why Resistance 2 was one of the best games ever:

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Story Mode

The Resistance franchise is based off of the premise that before Hitler could begin taking over Europe in the 1930s and ’40s, a group of aliens known as the Chimera did instead.  So instead of sending American troops to fight Hitler, the United States sent troops to help the Europeans battled the Chimera.  An American soldier, Nathan Hale, accidentally is infected by the Chimera virus and becomes a complete bad ass.  That’s basically the plot of the original.  In R2, the Chimera have pretty much taken Europe, and it is a last-ditch effort to try to keep them from completely stomping all over the United States.  Nathan Hale is recruited again to help fight the Chimera in a squad called the The Sentinels, a group of other soldiers infected with the same virus.  The story follows Nathan as he tries to push back the Chimera in America.

Now doesn’t that sound like fun?

It really was, too.  Despite being a bit linear in game play, the game was enjoyable as a stand-alone.  I will admit that, like many first person shooter games, the story mode is not that long.  I would complain about that, except for the fact that it has BOTH cooperative and competitive (just read on to see what I’m talking about).

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Cooperative

A good cooperative mode on a first person shooter is like the holy grail of game elements to me.  Cooperative forces people to have FUN and work as a TEAM instead of being jerks.  R2 created a class-based system for the cooperative that had amazing balance.  Classes included: Solider, Spec-Op, and Medic.  Each one had its own purpose.  The tank had the heavy weaponry.  The Spec-Op did the long distance and sniping dirty work.  The Medic supported and healed the team.  That’s perfection right there.  The cooperative mode could range from two to eight people and allowed people to work as the Spectre Team, a group trying to flush out the Chimera.  There were multiple, large maps that rotated the starting point, which made the maps feel more new and interesting, even if you played them a ton (like I did).  Sadly, Insomniac never offered map upgrades (shame on them), but I still enjoyed the cooperative so much that I didn’t care.

To me, cooperative is the best way to do online.  Aren’t games supposed to be FUN?  Why do I need to get worked up over playing a game?   Yes, in R2 you did get a score with how many points you got during the match, and it WAS fun to see if you could beat out your teammates, but at the end of the day, everyone has to work together for a goal.  There were parts that even when you were high-level, if the team wasn’t gelling, it was over.  Plus, when you aren’t worried about shooting other players (as opposed to killing NPCs), you learn to relax and enjoy the game.  The amount of inside jokes and craziness that ensued makes me always think fondly of R2.

Sigh.  Those were the days!

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Competitive

Just when you think the awesomeness of R2 could go no further–just wait–there is more!  R2 also has a competitive mode for people who are, well, competitive.  This type of game play has never been my cup of tea, but I did enjoy it on R2.  It was basically Chimera versus humans, but the cool thing was that you could select the size of the match.  You could have a small deathmatch, or you could have up to sixty players in a match.  Let me tell you, that could get crazy quickly.  Crazy fun, I mean. Apparently, for the time that it came out, it was the most that the PS3 had every hosted.  The whole feel of it was much different from a Call of Duty game.  It was much faster paced with the extra people, and although it was my least favorite part of the game, I still played because it was kind of fun.

So that’s Resistance 2.  A perfect mix of story mode, cooperative, and competitive.  I’m not saying that was a perfect game.  It has its flaws, but I just can’t seem to understand why no one else has decided to use this type of gaming structure for their first person shooter.  Maybe one day it will happen…

***Caution: Just because I love RI and R2 does NOT mean I recommend Resistance 3.  That game was a complete mess, and I like to pretend it never happened.***

By Ramon Rivera On 23 Apr, 2016 At 08:37 PM | Categorized As Featured, Playstation Vita, Reviews, Reviews | With 0 Comments
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Picture this: You are travelling in a plane without a care in the world.  Suddenly, the plane crashes, and you wake up as the only survivor.  You search for an exit, but instead of finding the world you know, you find yourself in a strange land.  Why are you here?  What happened?  A torrent of questions goes trough your mind.  Alone and scared you search for answers….This is the premise of DRPG Stranger of Sword City.

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When you start the game, you follow a little prologue.  You wake up and are naked and afraid.  Upon searching you find some clothes, and after moving forward, you find an old man.  “He means no harm” or so he says.  He kindly offers to guide you out of the maze in which you are….only to be greeted by a giant monster!!!  Suddenly the kind old man is not a friend but a fearsome foe that wants to take your life (for fun and giggles when he asks to stay still I answered “sure”).  It appears is game over for you, but in the blink of an eye, one of the wyvern’s necks is slashed clean by a girl called Rui who chases off the old man. She briefly explains that like you, she got stranded on this land called Escario, the city of swords.  Here you are called “Strangers.”  She then guides you to the Stranger Base for further explanations. There you learn that humans for a odd reason can wield more power and become a mighty city-defending hero.  You are a rare case (yep), and you are “The Chosen One.”  The only one that obtain crystals from powerful monsters called “Lineages.”  That is the story in a nutshell.

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Now one of the strongest traits in Stranger of Sword City is customization.  Right from the start, you get to customize your character’s avatar, race, class and even voice from the vast choices made available.  However, these are just related to aesthetic since these choices won’t affect the game play.  Another nice customization that the game offers is the choice of changing the NPC art, which basically modifies the look of the whole game since you’re interacting with NPCs the whole time (and the title screen art changes accordingly too!). One cool feature is when customizing your avatar is the Age, if you create for example a 15 year old it will have the bonus trait that it heals quickly,(ah the perks of youth) but since its young it won’t be to strong.  However, if you create a 30 year old, he will be stronger and will have more experience (the perks of a responsible adult).  It is a nice change of pace from typical DRPGS.

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Graphically, the art of the NPCS the Avatar and monster are awesome.  However, they feel kind of static since the characters don’t show much motion, but the narration is done in an engaging way.  It is partly narrative and partly descriptive, setting the mood and leaving room for your imagination to picture the scenes. The soundtrack also perfectly help to set the mood in the various situations you find yourself in.  I personally like games with good story and the narrative aspect of Stranger of Sword City kept me interested in the story. I liked the pace in which the game moves.

Concerning the game play, other than interacting with the other characters during the narrative parts, it revolves around exploring unmapped labyrinths in a dungeon crawler mechanic to face off boss creatures (Lineages), collect blood crystals, and unlock abilities. As you advance in a labyrinth, it gets mapped automatically, and you encounter creatures which you can evade but some are mandatory to face with your guild. The latter has to be strategically built.  The members are positioned depending on their abilities and class for the turn-based combats.  Another cool feature is the “Ambush.”  Here you can choose a ambush point and wait for monster carriers to appear (special type of monsters that carry valuable items).  After defeating them, you claim their loot.  However, if you take to much time to do so, they can flee and take their goods with them.  Watching your comrades grow and gaining new skills and spells as they level up is a rewarding process, especially since dungeon delving can be risky business.  As you unlock more abilities and gain access to better equipment, the release really opens up as an increasingly tactical affair. Depending on enemy formations and the type of foe that you’re up against, you’ll quickly start to form strategies for each battle.  The turn based combat system as a whole ends up having a satisfying amount of depth to it, so for grinders like myself, it is a field day.

Bottom line: Stranger of Sword City is a solid DRPG.  It has a great customize system, an engaging narrative that keeps you enthralled in the game, beautiful art, and a great soundtrack to boot.  If you love challenges and dungeon crawlers, Stranger of Sword City is a recommend game that must be in your library of games.  I give Stranger of Sword City a solid recommendation.

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Virtual Reality (VR) has been hovering over the world of technology for awhile now with products like the HTC Vive, Oculus Rift, Samsung Gear VR, Sony PlayStation VR, and the Microsoft HoloLens. Opto adds to that list with a defining difference: it intends to be the first portable VR headset with integrated audio. It’s Kickstarter campaign has already been launched on March 31 with the goal of 40,000 GBP by April 29 for the first 500 devices.

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Developed by industrial designer Tom Jarvis and software developer Richard Stephens, Opto is a portable VR headset where sound was a top priority during the start of its design. Speakers sit inside the headset so that users do not have to add their own headphones. It has a 40mm 32ohm speakers and a frequency of 20hz/20 khz.

Opto will support any smartphone with screen sizes between 4 and 5.1 inches. It will attach to the phone by way of a magnetic front cover that will allow the user to easily place the phone in and out of the device.

According to Opto’s blog, they are actually reworking the device to support larger phone screens as well as enlarging the acoustic chamber to 50mm.

It is made from the patented closed-cell foam material, XL Extralight, which should make it extremely lightweight and comfortable yet tough at the same time. This could make for an interesting angle for parents, considering that this technology is not only durable but is also easy to clean.

“It is especially suited to children as it’s made of lightweight foam and very impact resistant,” Co-founder Richard Stephens said. “We have tried it with children from about 9 upwards. We are also in partnership with WEARVR.com…They are also launching a new app for curated VR content for kids.”

This means that older children as well as adults could experience movies, games, and other content on the go in a full-immersion type of experience, though Stephens stresses that the device has not been tested on children younger than 9 (the American Academy of Pediatric recommends limited time for children on these types of devices anyhow).

The current set of VR devices as of right now are bulky and heavy. They also require wires as well as a set of headphones. The goal for Opto is to just carry a smartphone and the VR device instead of lugging around headphones as well.

“Opto is about making high-quality VR accessible for anyone who owns a smartphone. Our aim is to move VR from the gaming den into the living room, “ said Stephens.

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No GravatarThe Following is solely the opinion of the writer and not necessarily reflective of Real Otaku Gamer.

 

Amazon has recently begun to lock game sales on Amazon.com and Amazon UK to only Prime Members, including games like Grand Theft Auto 5, which is a consistent seller. This is one of the most anti consumer moves I have ever seen and is a terrible move, not just for video game fans but for consumers in general.

Amazon is essentially telling people that in order to have the right to purchase an item, they now have to purchase a membership to prime, with an annual fee just for the “privilege” of buying from them. I am scared that if this succeeds, it will spread and other retailers will begin subscription based purchases and this is not okay. I am a capitalist and am not ashamed of that in any way, but this goes beyond what is reasonable. One of the biggest online retailers in the world suddenly saying that you now have to pay a membership fee to buy from them, is an abuse of power and should not be tolerated.

Say someone has saved up for months to buy a game and they finally have a enough, only then they find out they need a membership subscription in order to buy the game, how do you think they would feel?  That is the question everyone who plays video games should ask. Gaming is an expensive hobby and we are being taken advantage of by Amazon and other retailers and that is not okay. Gamers have been treated badly by the press and now for retailers to do this is just pure and simple, a horrible move.  We are not a small group and if we make enough noise we can force change, We need to let Amazon know that we will not sit idly buy and let this happen.

Let this be a call to all gamers to make noise and demand a change of policy from Amazon. We can make a difference.

 

 

The above was solely the opinion of the author and does not necessarily reflect the views of the rest of Real Otaku Gamer

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No GravatarUncharted: Drake’s Fortune is the start to an amazing series.  I unfortunately played the games out of order (started with Uncharted 3).  I ended up buying the Uncharted/Uncharted 2 dual pack and really thought I got my money’s worth from both games.  Despite having some age, Uncharted is a blast to play.

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Uncharted: Drake’s Fortune is a third-person shooter, action-adventure game that came out on the PlayStation 3 in 2007.  It was developed by Naughty Dog and published by Sony.  Overall, it sold very well, and got critical acclaim, spawning two sequels.  Although when I originally heard about it, I thought it was going to be a Tomb Raider rip-off, so I ignored it completely until now.  This is not the case at all, and I wish I would have known that back in 2007.  This game is a ton of fun and does not play like a Tomb Raider game at all in game play, story, and tone.  If anything, it’s more Indiana Jones-like than Lara Croft.  The game was re-released as part of the Uncharted Collection in 2015 with slicker-looking graphics and more power.

In this game, we are introduced to Nathan Drake, treasure-hunter, Victor Sullivan, his mentor, and Elena Fisher, a journalist hired to record his adventures.  Nate is searching for Sir Francis Drake’s secret, which leads him on a quest for El Dorado.  Adventuring ensues with Elena provided as a love-interest for Drake.  Overall, it’s a fun story, but I felt the pacing was a little slower than Drake’s Deception.  I also was a little annoyed at the fact that the scenery was very similar: jungle/ruins.  That made the game feel a little dull, especially compared to Drake’s Deception, where you get to go to so many cool places.

The game is a typical third person shooter, duck and cover with the added elements of jumping and climbing.  Being the first of the series, it is definitely not as polished as the later games.  One thing that bugged me was the constant gun battles that lasted way too long and came up too often.  I felt like there wasn’t a very good balance between the adventuring portion and the action portion.  There were also some spots that drove me absolutely crazy and actually made me want to stop playing (I’ll get to that in a bit).  This is how I would classify each part of the game play:

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1.) Adventuring/Puzzles

To me, the fun part of the game is the adventuring, and even though I don’t particularly like puzzle games, I actually kind of enjoyed the ones in this game.  I could figure out most of the puzzles by myself, and the rest I easily found how to do on YouTube (what did we do before YouTube, right?).  The jumping, leaping, and climbing is pretty easy to get the hang of, although it was a lot more polished in the later games.  I actually wish there was more exploring and jumping puzzles.  I felt that it was a little lacking, especially for a Tomb Raider fan like myself.

2.) Fighting

This was the part that really annoyed me.  I thought there was way too many gun fights for an adventure game.  It felt like every time you turned the corner there was another gun fight.  It actually became very predictable after awhile and took away from the game a bit.  This aspect was much improved in later Uncharted games, but it still unfortunately took a little away from the game.

3.) Vehicles

Throughout the game, you will ride on different vehicles, including Jeeps and jet-skis.  To me, this was one of the more fun points of the game.  In the Jeep, Elena is driving and Nate is shooting.  With the jet ski, you are driving as Nate but also must shoot with Elena.  It was a fun change from the massive amounts of gun fights that consumed the game play.

For the time that the game came out, the graphics were pretty good.  Obviously now, they are a little dated.  However, I could stand the graphics, and they didn’t give me a headache from Final Fantasy VII syndrome.  By the way, Final Fantasy VII syndrome is a term my husband and I have coined to describe how older games with funky graphics give us headaches when we play because of the eye strain.

Here’s the problem with this game: It reminds me of how I felt about the original Mass Effect.  Now don’t get me wrong, except for the cover-shoot and third person game play, they are worlds different.  But because I had to wait to play the original Mass Effect since I typically play on PC or PlayStation, I had already played the second and third game.  Playing the original became tedious and unpleasant because I knew how much better the later games were.  I don’t see this as a complete knock to Uncharted: Drake’s Fortune.  With all gaming franchises, there are improvements that come along the way.  Luckily, this is a franchise that keeps on improving.

By Jonathan Balofsky On 17 Apr, 2016 At 11:27 PM | Categorized As Featured, News, Nintendo Wii/Wii U, ROG News | With 0 Comments
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Users on Neogaf discussed our previous post and found that all games with a digital version have the message about Nintendo Accounts. Thus we can write this off as an amazon mistake. Apologies for any confusion

 

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