You Are Browsing ' Featured ' Category

By Stark Wyvern On 7 Oct, 2017 At 05:06 PM | Categorized As Featured, Nintendo 3DS, Reviews | With 0 Comments

No Gravatar

Pokemon Silver brought me to my favorite region, and let return to Kanto as well. In an era now long since passed it is good to find myself playing this amazing game. This is actually the first time I’ve played it, in English, as the first time I played through it, it was a Japanese import. I had received it as a gift and the gifter had decided it would be cool to get an imported copy of both gold and silver. I needed a guide to play through the game, as obviously at the age of 8 I had no idea how to read Japanese.

Through playing that game though I developed a love of this region. Crystal followed after I had logged so many hours in my Japanese imports. I discovered my favorite Pokemon in Johto, and that Pokemon is Feraligatr. I also discovered a few other mainstays to a Johto team of mine, and that is always a good thing.

Coming back to Johto brings me back to a time now lost. A time where you couldn’t just wirelessly trade for Pokemon. You needed to have your friend nearby, literally next to you. My friends were around a lot as  8-year old which certainly is a good thing. Pokemon Silver was one of those amazing games that you wanted to play knowing friends were playing it as well. I logged hours upon hours in these old games even after my younger sister deleted my save files.

Johto will always be a stand out region to me because it brought us back to Kanto, the only time a game has done that. Two regions in one game, now that was revolutionary. I remember seeing Kanto for the first time in the game. Having just beat all the gyms it was time to head to the Elite Four. Surfing along I hop off Feraligatr and bam a man comes up to me, tells me I’m in Kanto. My young mind was blown, I was ecstatic.

Johto also has the distinction of having the first dark type Pokemon which in of itself is so cool. Pokemon that could stand up to the power of the wicked psychic types. Those psychic types really were so strong, it is actually a little shocking. I’ll always hope for a dark type gym, but of course in Japan, they are considered just a little too evil.

Pokemon Silver is just such a great game, with amazing music, great new Pokemon, and so many things to do and explore. Having 16 gym badges is also such a blast as you literally have double the fun. Battling Kanto Gym Leaders is also fun, along with facing Red and Blue again. I was a little disappointed that you couldn’t face your old team like in Twitch Plays Pokemon. That really would have been a great touch.

While it might have been weird playing a Japanese import I will always look back on that time with happiness. Playing Pokemon Silver will always have an effect on me, and I hope one day we get a next-gen remake of this game. I will always be down to jump back into this game, and relive the story, and remember what it was like, being 8. Playing a brand new Pokemon game before other kids, not understanding the game and using a guide, but loving it all the same.

Pokemon Silver will always be one of those comfort games, and I’m glad for it. I shocked myself this time playing the game through in only 15 hours, and to me that is extraordinary. So, thank you to my team of Feraligatr, Girafarig, Ampharos, Togetic, Donphan, and the Shiny Gyarados, you were all amazing. Pokemon Silver is available now on the Eshop, and if you’ve never experienced it I wholeheartedly think you should!

By Stark Wyvern On 6 Oct, 2017 At 01:52 AM | Categorized As Featured, NINTENDO, Reviews, Reviews | With 0 Comments

No Gravatar

Piczle Lines DX is a new game for Nintendo Switch and a pretty interesting puzzle game. This game relies on the player to make lines and create pictures. With a story that is rather simple, it might seem like a simple game. But the puzzles do in fact get harder as you go along. One wrong move and you have to start the puzzle all over again.

Solving puzzles takes only a drag of a line, through the right number of spaces. But don’t move too quickly, as you may just make a mistake and then you will have to start it all over. The puzzles do actually get bigger fairly early on, and then you have to deal with filling an even bigger space.

This game is certainly playable by just about anyone because it is rather easy to play. It lends itself to being a game you can pick up and play at any time, you might be in the mood for a puzzle. The game itself is cute and well designed for what it is.

This game won’t be for everyone, but for those who like puzzle games and cute main characters, this may be the game for you.

Piczle Lines DX is available for Nintendo Switch!

By Stark Wyvern On 6 Oct, 2017 At 12:59 AM | Categorized As Featured, PC Games, PlayStation, Reviews, Reviews, Xbox 360/Xbox One | With 0 Comments

No Gravatar

A Hat in Time is an amazing and cute game that fans have been waiting a long time for. I am certainly part of that club, and boy howdy did I like this game. A Hat in Time is an ode to classic Gamecube Era games and is a fun collect em all staring a fantastic little girl. Hat Kid is an embodiment in my opinion anyway, of the pure happiness that comes from these types of games. A go-getter type, Hat Kid does what she needs to complete missions and show the world she can do anything.

The game begins on her ship as she heads home. Soon her ships energy source, or hourglasses, are loosed upon an unsuspecting world. Hat Kid is forced to travel down and find them, taking on weirdos, and traveling to new lands. Each land is its own place and the characters are all wacky and zanier than in the last one.

You fight insane bosses who will take all of your cunnings to defeat. Help out weird locals with strange needs like filming a movie or fulfilling a soul-stealing contract. These quests are the only way to get hourglasses so do them all!

The worlds themselves have great music and are filled to the brim with strange things to discover. You never know what you’ll find and that is part of the fun. You’ll traverse each place and will feel full of joy as you uncover things and complete weird tasks. Nothing is too hard for our amazing hero.

You’ll meet so many weird characters, but the most interesting character is Mustache girl. A strange girl who is the same age as Hat Kid but sports a blonde mustache. Certainly a weird choice but one that seems to work. Is this girlfriend or foe, you’ll learn soon enough.

A Hat in Time is one of those amazing games that fans helped create through Kickstarter. I really do love that fans are now helping to make games in that way, as we really do choose what games to be made. This game certainly is filled with love, and if you are a fan of Gamecube era games, is one you should pick up. While not available on Nintendo Switch, this game is available on Steam, PS4, and XBox One. So go on a quest for hourglasses and help Hat Kid out, she might not need your help, but she will be glad for the company!

*Code was given graciously by the developers of the game*

No Gravatar

The console wars are something we have heard for so many years now, but no one can bring a console war like Idea Factory. Now we have among us another game set in an alternate story from the rest of the games in the series like MegaTagmension Blanc + Noire. Most of the cast is present but they don’t know each other, and they have different roles to fulfill as the game progresses, in this game Idea Factory is the main character and always an adventurer.

The Game starts off with a cutscene of Idea Factory ridding her bike avoiding obstacles (and being really cool if I may add) and you see the Goddesses engaging in battle, after that you notice that Gameindustri has transformed into a post-apocalyptic wasteland, while it isn’t explained how exactly that happened, it is clearly a war has destroyed the once beautiful scenery. While I.F. is searching for an ancient library said to contain every piece of the world’s history, she sees what first appears to be a shooting star but is in fact a person falling from the sky. When they found the library, they are greeted by the library’s guardian Histoire, while investigating the library I.F. gets wrapped up in a case where all of the world’s history has been stolen so she must travel through time in order to repair it, and her bike after some mods are used to travel trough time (super cool, kind of a chrono trigger situation).

The game’s mission-based structure is different than what fans are used to. Histoire is once again throwing tasks your way. However, next to each mission is a countdown. As you clear other missions, the timer will start to countdown. If the timer reaches zero, the mission will disappear completely. Each mission holds a level of importance in context to its effect on history on thus the type of ending one will receive. Combat closely resembles previous entries in the series. You move the party member around a set area, then proceed to attack, use a skill, or consume an item. There are also gems scattered around the field that you have to jump up to collect, such as health recovery items, which can be very useful when cornered in a boss fight. By landing hits on an enemy as a party, a Fever Gauge will fill up. Once it’s full, a Rainbow Gem will appear that activates Fever Time (in place of the EX Gauge). This causes the entire party’s stats to increase by 10% and stop enemies from getting a turn. EXE Drives (special attacks) can also be used. Once a turn is over, the amount of Active Gauge used will deplete from the Fever Gauge until it’s depleted, ending Fever Time. I.F. even has her own HDD Form with her “Flame Awakening” state which causes her stats to increase dramatically. All of these mechanics help make battles more dynamic, and for me made the combat to be more enjoyable.

The series good humor and jokes continue are still staple in the series, and one thing that I like is that they don’t take themselves to seriously (see the above image). While fans of the series will find some recycled assets and sounds, the combat and the different challenges in each stage make the replay value higher than your average game. Bottom line SuperDimension Neptune Vs Sega Hard Girls is a fun game, with tons of references to scratch that nostalgic itch and the gameplay is more than satisfactory to help it stand up as its own entry.

By Stark Wyvern On 5 Oct, 2017 At 09:41 PM | Categorized As Featured, NINTENDO, Nintendo Switch, Reviews | With 0 Comments

No Gravatar

One Piece is a celebrated anime and my all time favorite, so naturally, I had to play this game for Switch. While it was previously available on 3DS, PlayStation 3 and XBox360, it is finally here for Switch. This game is an awesome game that gives you a solid story and sets you on an adventure with the Straw Hat Crew.

There is a new but old villain in town, named Patrick Redfield, a former great pirate who once stood on par with Roger and Whitebeard. This man is back and that means nothing good for our favorite rubber pirate and his crew. The heroes are due for a little downtime when they find Trans Town. Little do they know, they are in for quite an adventure.

With Luffy leading the charge they find this town needs help, and then it happens. The crew vanishes in a weird scene. Luffy and his game only friend Pato, head off on a journey. Heading to familiar places like Punk Hazard and some other classic venues they find the crew. The game continues to tell a story of the crew working to take down Redfield. Heading to other iconic lands and facing all sorts of baddies from the past. Using the crew you can fight them with whoever you want.

Watching Franky, Robin, and Chopper take on foes they never faced is a treat. This game has some welcome fanservice, which adds to the appeal. Will Luffy and his crew defeat the deadly pirate with his wicked ability or fall flat?

Alongside the normal story is a coliseum mode. As this game came out in the throes of the Dressrosa Arc, its time to enter the Doflamingo hosted Corrida Coliseum. Use whatever characters you’d like from the crew or even use other characters, like Jinbe, Ace, and even Admiral Fujitora. In a challenging round based tournament. Lose a match and drop down to the beginning. Once you lose you start over, and have to work back to the top.

The last great thing about this game is that you get all the DLC. So you can fit your characters in different costumes, that while they are just for show add some customization. It is just a cool little feature to make your playthrough fun.

One Piece Unlimited World Red Deluxe is a solid game. It’s Musou styled gameplay is quick and easy to pick up. You can grind, and gather items, which make the town grow. Learn secret words to gain new attacks. Relive some amazing fights and use whatever characters you might want. Head out on the Grand Line and help Luffy take down one of his greatest foes he’s ever faced. You can get One Piece Unlimited World Red on Switch right now!

By Stark Wyvern On 5 Oct, 2017 At 05:03 PM | Categorized As Featured, NINTENDO, Nintendo 3DS, Portable/Mobile Gaming, Reviews, Reviews | With 0 Comments

No Gravatar

Yokai Watch 2 was an awesome game and of course, following the Pokemon model, it is time for Yokai Watch’s first third game. In Psychic Specters, you, play the same game mostly, but there are little moments here and there that are different. It is really still just such a solid game, and one that will hold fans attention until Yokai Watch 3 and Yokai Watch Busters finally come westward.

Yokai Watch 2 Psychic Specters is certainly just as fun even if you have played the game before. The world is always such a fun place to explore and there are so many Yokai to befriend. All of the QR Codes of work again for this game, so you can use them to your heart’s content. This game really allows you to play how you want and that is a good thing.

Psychic Specters also comes with a lot of extra content, to build upon the first two entries. You can now befriend the Wicked Yokai which is a cool thing. Those Wicked Yokai looked really cool and I am glad to be able to befriend them. They certainly act nicer once befriended but it just is cool to have former baddies on your side.

There is also a full story for Dame Deadtime, who in my opinion is a truly terrible villain. Her boss fight can be tedious, and her character to me just seems weak. But it is always interesting learning about characters. You also get the whole story on Darknyan which is another interesting one. Far more interesting to me than the Dame’s story.

You can also befriend other strange Yokai including the Jewelnyans and the nose picking Snottle. After completing the main story head to Yokai Land and experience a whole new area. Psychic Blasters is a revamped version of Yokai Watch Blasters and the perfect lead up to the full game which should come westward in the future.

All in all, if you liked Yokai Watch 2 you will certainly enjoy this game. If you have the first one you can transfer your save file and continue from where you left off. Or start fresh, and experience the game all over again. This game is also great for anyone who has only played the first game or never at all. It has a good beginning section and allows you to see all the Yokai from both games.

Yokai Watch 2 Psychic Specters is a great RPG and one that you’ll probably enjoy. If you haven’t yet, you can get this game on your 3DS in stores or on the Eshop!

By Jessica Brown On 3 Oct, 2017 At 07:26 PM | Categorized As Featured, PC Games, Reviews | With 0 Comments

No Gravatar

  • TITLE: Aporia: Beyond the Valley
  • DEVELOPER: Investigate North
  • PUBLISHER: Green Man Gaming
  • GENRE: Adventure
  • PLATFORM: PC (via Steam)
  • PRICE: $16.99 USD
  • RELEASE DATE: July 19, 2017

I first encountered Aporia: Beyond the Valley in 2015 as a free-to-play alpha demo. At the time, I was looking for some fun adventure and puzzle games, similar to those in the Myst franchise, and the game’s unique style drew me in. The game’s developer was very kind and worked with me to make my way through as much of the demo as I could and, even though it was a bit rough around the edges, I was looking forward to seeing where the game would eventually go. Yet, after that time, it was nearly two years until I heard anything more about this little gem. This past July, I happened to notice that the game was heading to Steam and I was quite surprised. I dug out the old email thread I had with the developer and got back in touch and they were very kind to provide me with a review code for the full version of the game.

One of the unique things about Aporia is that it’s a game with a compelling narrative and yet one completely free of dialogue of any kind. When you start a new game, you awaken from what appears to be suspended animation in a large cave-like chamber and you seem to be quite alone. In front of you, placed with purpose and awaiting your removal, is a glowing cylinder on a large platform that’s begging you to pick it up. While in this large cavernous space you’ll see five other suspension devices, some long empty and another that appears still occupied though is partially covered by large debris, large tapestries, and a pedestal that you can fit your newly-found glowing cylinder into. Doing so activates a sort of holographic stop-motion animated sequence that gives you a bit of backstory on the cylinder you now possess, showing its creation by a shaman as well as seemingly showing the group of people who appear to have been sealed in this chamber at some later point. If you pay attention closely to these individuals and compare their dress to the symbols in the room, you can figure out not only who was within each of the chambers in the room, but you can also figure out who you most likely are playing as.

What you encounter in the first few minutes of the game demonstrates how the game’s storyline will be delivered throughout the rest of your adventure. As you make your way out of the chamber, down the winding cliffside paths, and eventually into the titular valley itself, you’ll encounter various tapestries that relay pieces of the inhabitants’ past. Sometimes these are just benign bits of information, or perhaps a small story that serves as a warning about a certain environmental hazard (such as one group of tapestries that shows the drowning of a fisherman which warns you about the strong currents in the nearby river), but others warn you about more ominous threats. You will also periodically find more pedestals that you can insert your cylinder into and play more stop-motion animation sequences that will continue to shed more light on the larger history of the valley and the individuals who lead them (including yourself).


The cylinder you possess ends up being a key component to exploring the valley and unlocking its secrets. In the chamber you awaken in, you’ll be shown how you can use the cylinder in certain types of pedestals to drain a bit of its glowing essence and direct it to power certain objects or open locked doors. Sometimes you’ll have to direct energy through multiple pedestals in an energy relay of sorts or use multiple pedestals to power a single doorway. However, each time you use the cylinder to do a task like this it will drain a bit of its power. Once the cylinder is empty you won’t be able to use it until you replenish its resources. Thankfully this isn’t too difficult in most cases unless you went out of your way to waste its power because you’ll generally find various jugs containing the glowing liquid you’ll need scattered around the environment. Each jug fills about a quarter of the cylinder’s energy, though, so you will want to make judicious use of your resources. As you press on further along your adventure, you’ll also discover a few other uses for your device. For starters, if you take it out while in a dark area such as a building or cave, the glowing liquid will serve as a flashlight for you. The light from the cylinder can also cause special flowers to bloom on demand and consuming them will replenish some of your health should you need it. You’ll also be able to use it to cause other types of plants to grow, creating bridges and ladders out of vines that will allow you to access areas you previously couldn’t.

Although the game focuses a great deal on exploration on your journey to uncover the mystery of what happened to the great civilization that once inhabited the valley, the game also presents you with various puzzles that you will need to solve along the way. While these do take a good deal of thought to figure out, most of the time the methodology behind them makes sense and the puzzles don’t feel unfair. In this regard, the developer seems to have struck a solid balance between difficulty and fun. Also, as you make your way into the main valley itself you also will begin to encounter a supernatural shadow-like entity whose existence will have been somewhat hinted at in various tapestries you previously encountered. Being in its presence will begin to slowly drain away your health, so you’ll want to shine your cylinder at it to make it leave you alone or quickly get away from it. Because you’ve been allowed to explore unimpeded prior to this point, the entity’s presence is alarming. Thankfully, its menace is at first merely startling and then annoying and it won’t pose much of a threat to you until you’re a bit further along in your journey.

Visually, Aporia is a pretty impressive experience. The environments are well-detailed and feel very much alive and the environmental effects like low-lying fog are done well. The game also does a great job with its lighting effects. Everything looks fantastic while playing on a large 4K HDR display and the game is incredibly immersive.

Unfortunately, despite all of this there are a few graphical bugs that I encountered during my exploration. In a few spots, when taking a closer look at the ground it’s quite apparent that the grass, weeks, and pebbles are actually being rendered floating slightly above the actual terrain. The lighting also acts strangely when you transition an exterior area to an interior one or vice-versa. Also, the way water flows across the environment can appear awkward in a few spots and in a couple areas the water textures appear glitchy. There were also a couple instances of environmental objects not rendering incorrectly when loading a save file. However, rather than existing as invisible textures, these objects didn’t load in at all, meaning that where once a bridge or dock should have existed there was nothing. The only way to force them to load in was to walk away far enough for them to debuff and then return, hoping they spawned correctly that time. This was particularly unfortunate though when the game had been saved while standing on one of these objects, causing me to immediately fall into the rushing river below when loading my save file.

Jumping into the river caused me to get dragged along a bit until I got stuck on the environment. At this point, I wasn’t drowning but I was also unable to get away from the strong currents. Eventually, I managed to do some tricky maneuvers and break free, but had I been unable to do so I would have had no choice but to reload a previous save file. There was also one instance where the game completely froze up on me and I never could figure out exactly what caused this to happen.

Ultimately, I feel like Aporia: Beyond the Valley is a mysterious, intriguing, and beautifully-puzzling adventure game that will draw people in with its unique story and presentation. There’s a lot to love with this one, even if it’s true that the game could have used a bit more polish before being released. I feel like Aporia is a very good game in its current form, but with a bit more work it could have been an excellent game. Still, the core beauty of the game itself and the world it presents manages to shine through, keeping any one individual bug from marring an otherwise lovely experience.

Aporia: Beyond the Valley is a solid adventure that would make an excellent addition to any PC gamer’s library, particularly if they enjoy Myst-like experiences!

ADDITIONAL SCREENSHOTS (Click for 4K):

By Stark Wyvern On 3 Oct, 2017 At 07:55 PM | Categorized As Featured, PC Games, Reviews | With 0 Comments

No Gravatar

Community INC is now available on Steam. You play the founder of a community that must work to grow and cultivate a rich landscape for your own settlement. The people will work for you to make themselves a home, and it is up to you to guide them. This game is an interesting one, and I’ve not seen something like it for a while now.

In Community Inc, you start out with just a portal and land. Using this portal you can bring in people who will become workers. They all start out as Builders but can gain experience in other things. Using these people you gather supplies like wood and soon are able to build workbenches and houses. These little people all have their own skills and character which makes it pertinent to choose suitable tasks.

Another interesting aspect is certainly that they will react to your actions. If you don’t say, feed them enough they will, of course, be upset by this. These villagers have emotions too and that can lead them to do dangerous things. If too many of them are angry they will set things ablaze. Clearly, they love a good old fashioned riot.

The characters all have their own names and it just made me want to figure out their own stories. Why they were coming through this portal to help me.

Community Inc is certainly a game all about building, but you really do have to take other things into consideration. With emotions to keep in line, you may need to give these little people some leeway.

The build we had of CommunityInc was in beta and wasn’t perfect but it is clear where this game is going. A game where one can build a settlement is certainly a fun game to play. It is always nice to see an unpopulated area become something much more, and that is why I have enjoyed trying out this game.

*Review code given by publisher

By Stark Wyvern On 1 Oct, 2017 At 10:47 PM | Categorized As Featured, NINTENDO, Nintendo Switch, Reviews | With 0 Comments

No GravatarNintendo loves mixing up genres, and Arms is their retooled version of a fighting game. A game that can literally make you sweat if played right, this game will test your mettle.

Imagine yourself with arms made of rubber, or at least arms that stretch, that is the crux of this amazing games. Fighters enter an arena and using their amazing arms do battle.

The characters themselves are so varied there is a lot to think about when choosing who you want to play as. Besides the different colors, and what they use as a weapon, you also have to think about their abilities. You see, like any other fighting game, these characters all have their strengths and weaknesses.

Say you choose, Ninjara, while fast you also have a teleport attack which can change how you play. Ribbon Girl can literally jump with music and Master Mummy can heal while blocking. Then you have characters like the newly added Lola Pop who can inflate herself just like a balloon. These characters really all do take some getting used to just because they are all so unique.

Arms is a game that you can certainly play for any amount of time. It is a game that has quite a few game modes for short sessions. Winning fights and these other games net you funds for purchases. The fights you will get into will get harder, and maximizing your success will come a little easier depending on the Arms you have at your disposal.

It is also a treat gathering arms as it takes money and your punches to even gain more. It might not be easy all the time, but collecting Arms is fun. Plus if you collect the same Arm it will increase its power which is quite a cool thing. Arms is a game that really wants you to succeed and doesn’t want you to feel like you are wasting time and in-game money on gathering more Arms.

Arms really is a game that is worth playing. You need to see this game to believe it. It can also be quite the exercise if done using the standard thumbs up grip. Playing for a few hours can cause your muscles to ache the next day which proves it is a solid fighting game. You do feel like you are actually throwing the punches as you really are. It just makes this game that much cooler.

So, pick up your joy cons, pick a fighter and jump into the ring. ARMS is available now on the Nintendo Switch and is an absolutely great fighter with a lot of heart!

By Jessica Brown On 1 Oct, 2017 At 01:17 PM | Categorized As Best Game Ever, Editorials, NINTENDO | With 2 Comments

No Gravatar

Let’s face it: when The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess made its debut back in November 2006 it had some really big shoes to fill. In terms of major console releases, it was following in the footsteps of some popular pedigrees: The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time (one of the most highly-regarded games of all time), its 2000 sequel Majora’s Mask, and the expansive, high-seas adventure that was The Legend of Zelda: Wind Waker on the GameCube. The years 2001 to 2005 also marked an explosion of very popular entries on the Game Boy and Game Boy Advance that despite their small size were very much full-on epic adventures.

When I played through Wind Waker, I couldn’t help but wonder what was next for the franchise. In some ways, the game had an air of finality to it. Hyrule had been washed away deep beneath the waves and Ganondorf had been delivered a final death blow with the Master Sword, leaving both he and it sealed beneath the oceans covering what used to be Hyrule. If anything in the series had ever felt like a final moment in the timeline, this was it. Yet, as we came to discover, Nintendo was using the time-bending elements of Ocarina of Time as an excuse to split the timeline into separate branches. Wind Waker, it turned out, was just one of the possible outcomes.

With this in mind, Twilight Princess is set many years after the ending of Ocarina of Time. In this game’s backstory, when Link returns to the time period he was initially from, he warns Princess Zelda of Ganondorf’s plans for the future. The two then convince Zelda’s father, the King of Hyrule, that Ganondorf must be punished lest Hyrule face its eventual destruction, so the King has him executed. Only…Something doesn’t quite go right, and instead of killing him they end up having to seal him within the Twilight Realm. This fact plays an important role later in the game, when we finally come to understand why the Twilight Realm is imposing itself on Hyrule, and who is ultimately motivating its de facto leader, Zant.

I’ll be honest: when it comes to my active play-time with any of the Zelda games out there, The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess takes the cake. While I’m sure that I’ll eventually sink in a lot more time with Breath of the Wild on the Switch once I properly dig deep into it, at present no other game comes close to Twilight Princess in terms of time invested into it. At the time, Twilight Princess felt like a large world with a ton of things to see and do. Certainly, it was much larger than Ocarina of Time and perhaps Wind Waker as well (since a lot of that game consisted of open seas). Yet, what caused me to spend more time with this game than any that came before it was the sheer amount of collectibles and upgrades you could get. Gaining all 20 heart containers was no easy feat in itself as there were many sub-quests you had to do in order to get all of them. Also, special upgrades like larger quivers or the magical armor that would make you invincible at the expense of a constant draining of your rupees also necessitated a fairly large investment of your time. But, despite all of this, I had a lot of fun trying to fully complete the game and I have no regrets for the time spent with it.

The dungeons in Twilight Princess are both well thought-out and massive. They are also quite memorable too. The Lakebed Temple and City in the Sky were particularly challenging and interesting to explore. Also, the boss fights were both intense and enjoyable. The boss of the City in the Sky, Argorok, was perhaps the most annoying and difficult boss in the game for me. I’d even go as far as to say defeating it was more laborious than taking down Ganon in the final battle!

One of the things that I remember sticking out to me when I first played Twilight Princess was the fact that the Twilight Realm mechanic felt like it was paying homage to the Dark World from Zelda: A Link to the Past. It was interesting to me to see how the pervading twilight managed to twist and corrupt the things that it came in touch with. I also recall finding it quite refreshing that the game felt more like an epic. In some games, it felt like Link was primarily alone on his quest to save Hyrule, but here you had people that were genuinely aware of what was going on and in some cases people who were ready and willing to help. In fact, there was an entire resistance of able-bodied adults who were with him at major points in the game, even helping storm Hyrule Castle in the game’s penultimate confrontation.

It also had an ending that was a bit of an emotional ride. By the adventure’s end, it was clear that Midna, revealed to be the rightful ruler of the Twilight Realm, had feelings for Link, yet in the game’s final moments when it feels she is about to reveal these feelings to the young hero, she destroys the mirror that connects their two worlds completely. I remember being very angry with that, feeling that she owed to both Link and herself, to be honest about her feelings, and yet she went as far as to destroy any hope they ever had of seeing each other again. It was quite powerful.

While I’ll admit that I haven’t played Twilight Princess HD on the Wii U before, but the 2016 remaster does indeed look quite gorgeous! It even has some nice easter eggs and special content that was added to it to make it stand out a bit more. Obviously, it was sort of a lead-in to this year’s Zelda: Breath of the Wild (which is also available on the Wii U in addition to the Switch), but I’d certainly love to see both this one and Wind Waker HD eventually get ported to the Nintendo Switch.

Ultimately, I think that Twilight Princess managed to pay homage to Ocarina of Time in quite a meaningful way, but it also built off of the successes of that game and created a large world that actually felt alive, begging to be explored. Because of this, 2011’s The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword felt like a step back in some ways. The way that the overworld had to be explored felt a lot more closed off and a bit less inviting. Thankfully, Nintendo seemed to listen to its fans and critics and took Breath of the Wild in a completely different direction.

So much of Twilight Princess can be seen in Breath of the Wild that I feel like we owe a bit of thanks to this entry in the long-running franchise. If Twilight Princess was born out of a question of “Where will this series possibly go next? ” I can’t help but think that Breath of the Wild will ultimately yield some of the same questions. Perhaps, though, that will mean that it will eventually yield another amazing follow-up, just as Twilight Princess managed to successfully follow both Ocarina of Time and Wind Waker. If that pattern is to be followed once more, then I can’t help but think that we are in for yet another treat in the hopefully not-too-distant future!

********

If you’ve never played The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess (or even if you have!), I hope this article gave you a taste of what made it a fantastic adventure that absorbed so much of my time when it first came out. This article is part of a larger series explores the history of the series and its major entries. Be sure to check out the hub article at NekoJonez’s Arpegi for links to all the great articles and retrospectives on this epic series.

(Image courtesy of ZoeF on DeviantArt)