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By Jonathan Balofsky On 20 Sep, 2017 At 02:40 PM | Categorized As News, News, News, NINTENDO, PC Games, PlayStation, ROG News, Xbox 360/Xbox One | With 0 Comments

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Arc System Works is going all out to celebrate Kunio Kun.  Kunio-kun: The World Classics Collection has been announced for  release on Nintendo Switch, PS4 Xbox One and Steam in 2018.

This collection will contain all 11 Famicom games as well as the 4 NES variants. In addition there will be online play! No word on an English version yet.

 

Hopefully the Super Famicom games also get such a collection and receive a localization. They were certainly amazing.

 

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By Jessica Brown On 20 Sep, 2017 At 02:36 PM | Categorized As PC Games, ROG News | With 0 Comments

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Casual Bit Games has just released a new teaser-trailer for Battle Princess Madelyn, which shattered its KickStarter goals with more than quadruple what they asked for, and is set to hit the PC, PlayStation 4, Vita, XBox One, Wii U, and Nintendo Switch in Q1 2018.

The game is set in a fantasy medieval Ireland but will take Madelyn on an adventure all around the world. The gameplay and aesthetics are very reminiscent of the older Ghosts N’ Goblins games as well as the more recent Cursed Castilla, which is certainly a good thing!

Here are some key features we can look forward to!:

  • Story mode allows players to explore the vast world of Princess Madelyn – uncover the secrets of the kingdom and beyond.
  • A 10 level Arcade mode for the action hungry old school game player – levels designed specifically for a fast action arcade experience.
  • Join Madelyn on her quest of self-discovery as she helps others, and not just herself, to becomes a wiser more mature knight and to save her family and kingdom from the clutches of evil.
  • An array of weaponry to choose from, each with its own unique abilities, which are also modified by the three different types of armor the player can receive on their way through the game.
  • Meet many different characters as Madelyn builds a support system throughout the kingdom.
  • Loads of ghouls, demons and bosses to crush on your way to becoming the kingdom’s most powerful defender.

For more news, keep an eye on Casual Bit Games’s main website!

 

By Jonathan Balofsky On 19 Sep, 2017 At 11:18 PM | Categorized As News, News, PC Games, PlayStation, ROG News, Xbox 360/Xbox One | With 0 Comments

No GravatarBethesda sent out the following

 

The Nazis have taken over America. They’ve turned Manhattan into a wasteland. They’ve walled off New Orleans and are systematically purging the city, burning people and homes to the ground. And they brazenly walk the streets of small-town USA – going where they want, taking what they want and behaving however they please. But this is not BJ Blazkowicz’s America. The United States will never be broken – especially with BJ on the job, rallying the Resistance and igniting a revolution. Watch the Resistance rise up to strike fear in the Nazis in the latest trailer for Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus.

Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus, the highly-anticipated sequel to the critically acclaimed first-person shooter Wolfenstein: The New Order, will be available worldwide on October 27, 2017 for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC.

You can see the trailer below

 

Wolfenstein II looks amazing and this new trailer is incredible. Will you be buying the game?

 

Source: Bethesda PR

By Jessica Brown On 19 Sep, 2017 At 05:14 PM | Categorized As Featured, PC Games, Reviews | With 0 Comments

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  • TITLE: “Evil Genome”
  • DEVELOPER: Crystal Depths Studio
  • PUBLISHER: Crystal Depths Studio
  • GENRE: Metroidvania Action-RPG
  • PLATFORM: PC (Steam)
  • RELEASE DATE: August 7, 2017
  • PRICE: $14.99 USD

Evil Genome is an action-RPG from Chinese developer Crystal Depths Studio. The game is styled as a “Metroidvania” action-RPG by the developers, and for the most part, this is a fair assessment. The game has a lot of depth and some fun gameplay, but is it ultimately worth your time and the $14.99 asking price?

The game is set in a seemingly post-apocalyptic future, where Lachesis, who is about to rendezvous with a nearby base, has her ship shot down in a sudden missile attack. Waking up at the wreck in the middle of the desert, she seems to be lacking any real memories of who she is or what she was doing and, unfortunately for her, the AI system that accompanies her cannot provide her with any classified (in this case, non-combat) information without Lachesis’s memory core being restored. From this beginning, it’s all about exploration and combat while trying to figure out what the heck is actually going on.

Gameplay is presented with horizontal movement in a 3D playing field. The graphics are for the most part well-developed and provide a lot of depth for the environments while there are plenty of things for the player to do in the foreground. Various items and upgrades can be found in chests and crates hidden (or not hidden) throughout the environment and, as you might expect, be looted from defeated enemies. Like any good action-RPG, there is an experience system that provides players with a skill tree to progress through each time they level up, giving them the ability to customize Lachesis’s play style to their own personal preferences and strengths. Meanwhile, the game gives players a Metroidvania style map that updates as they explore, and players will have various main missions and side-quests they can complete as they go.

While I really wanted to enjoy Evil Genome, I found that it was ultimately held back on several fronts.

For starters, while I do recognize that the game was developed by a Chinese studio (presumably for whom English was not their first language), the game’s English translation is rife with spelling and grammatical errors. What’s worse, the grammar errors actually spill over into the game’s spoken, voice-acted dialogue, making it extremely awkward at times. The voice work, outside of perhaps the main character, is also exceptionally sub-par throughout the experience. What dialogue is delivered without any grammatical problems is very flat and lacks any sort of emotion. Some characters seem to change their voice and how they speak during the game, sometimes even during the same segment of dialogue! Another problem with the grammar flaws is that they also make the menus rather difficult to deal with, sometimes leaving you guessing at what something (such as a skill description) actually means.

There are also quite a few bugs present too. Some of these are benign, such as the screen fading in an odd way while the dialogue is being delivered, but others are a bit more egregious. There are several times when aspects of the environment flicker or otherwise exhibit artifacts, the fact that you seemingly cannot climb or go down a ladder without jumping towards it (which is particularly weird when you want to descend it!), enemies that glitch out and seem to be invulnerable, and also issues with performance. The game suffers some choppiness due to frame-rate issues in a few spots, even while playing on a high-end system with a GTX 1080 Ti. Changing settings like turning off V-Sync seem to do nothing to resolve the issue (and in fact may even make performance even worse!).

To me, Evil Genome feels like one of those games that was rushed out and needed a lot more polish. It’s almost as if we are playing a test build of the game, something that might not even have been ready for Steam’s Early Access status. It’s frustrating, though, because it feels like this game has a lot of potential and a few things that it’s begging us to love about it. The gameplay, honestly, beyond some of the buggy behavior is actually pretty fun, and even though the story is quite vague I do wonder where it’s ultimately going. But beyond that, though, I find myself having trouble actually recommending the purchase.

Ultimately, I’d say that Evil Genome is a below-average game that needs a lot of work before I’d say it was worth the investment. Maybe if it was on sale at a deep discount or as part of a larger bundle it would be worth it, but as it stands now I’d recommend passing on it. Hopefully, Crystal Depths will take a look at the criticisms offered by reviewers and Steam users and look into cleaning up the game because, if they did, I think they’d have a fun adventure title on their hands.

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The Dishonored series has been one of the more interesting things to have come out of gaming in recent years.  The games offer more choices that do affect how the game progresses, which give the games a lot of replayability. That said, there are some who feel the games have been becoming formulaic. For those who feel that way though, Dishonored: Death of The Outsider offers some changes to what you might expect.

Death of the Outsider follows Billie Lurk as she aids Doud in his revenge against the Outsider. From there however, things get strange. Billie gains abilities like one would expect in a Dishonored game, but not in the usual way. In fact, Death of the Outsider does a lot different, such as removing the chaos system altogether. This does affect the replayability of the game, but the tradeoff is a more innovative experience. Billie’s powers are fun to use, and offer multiple ways to go about things. Without giving spoilers, there are certain parts of the game that you just want to replay over and over, because there are so many different ways to complete an objective, and each way is extremely satisfying.

The gameplay in general is handled well, but I do feel that with the removal of the chaos system, the game is lacking something. Even with the chaos system removed, something equal could have been there, but what is in place just does not feel up to par with the previous games. That being said, I do appreciate the game moving away and trying something new.

Another thing to address is the fact that this is essentially DLC being sold separately. I have seen many complain about that, but I don’t know why. This is not a new concept, such as seen with Infamous: First Light, Uncharted: The Lost Legacy, and even Bethesda themselves with Wolfenstein: The Old Blood. I actually like the idea of DLC being sold as standalone games, especially in this case, since as mentioned,  Death of the Outsider does a lot of new things.

The game is rather short ( although considering it is an expansion, that is fine), but satisfying. You still feel awesome using the abilities, and there is the right mix of stealth and action along with a detailed story. The game works to resolve many of the overarching questions of the series, but manages to leave many things open for a possible sequel.

After playing Dishonored: Death of the Outsider, I felt Arkane Studios and Bethesda truly managed to take the series in a new direction. While some may not like this, I felt it may have been needed as it keeps things fresh. Playing this was an awesome experience, and I feel this is one that more people should play. Obviously this is not a good place to start with the series, especially as it spoils the events of Dishonored 2, and gives it a canonical series of events. But for fans of the series, this is a great game. I fully recommend it.

 

………….

 

 

Disclaimer: Bethesda provided a review key

 

Reviewed on PS4

By Jonathan Balofsky On 15 Sep, 2017 At 01:34 PM | Categorized As PC Games, ROG News | With 0 Comments

No GravatarHappinet sent out the following

 

Japanese videogame publisher, Happinet, revealed it will bring Hyakki Castle, a beautifully stylized 3D dungeon RPG game, to PC via Steam this winter for western players. The game transports players to a terrifying haunted castle, to confront and battle creatures from ancient Japanese literature. Fans will be treated to beautiful Ukiyo-e style graphics and ghost lore inspired by famous ancient Japanese scrolls and artists.

 

Hyakki Castle is a real-time RPG in which players will explore a sinister fictional castle set in the 18th century – during the Edo Period, an infamous period in Japanese history known for economic growth, social order, foreign policies, healthy population and heightened enjoyment of arts and culture. The game’s giant castle is situated on Hyakki Island, where skilled criminals were exiled, but also rumored to be on the island were ghosts and demons. Borrowing from these ghost stories, Hyakki Castle creates an eerie and mysterious environment where the evil supernatural have been summoned by a shadowy figure and it’s up to the player to strategically make their way through the dark rooms and areas.

“We wanted to bring a fresh new approach and subject matter to this generation of dungeon RPG gamers,” said Masaru Saito of Happinet. “Hyakki Castle borrows from a rich period of time in Japan’s ancient history and aims to deliver a memorable experience through our strong Japanese warrior classes along with unusual monsters and supernatural creatures that are unique to Japanese folklore.”

 

Players can choose to split their party up into a 2 party system, a feature not yet seen in real-time dungeon RPGs, allowing a player to select four characters and make one party with them, creating new strategic gameplay possibilities. For instance, one character can lure a monster while the other three lay in wait for an ambush—or the party can split to flank a monster or to solve a puzzle. Players can play as traditional Japanese classes such as Samurai, Ninja or Monk while also choosing from different races, such as Oni, Tengu or Nekomata, with each having their own special abilities.

 

The giant castle is mysterious and dark, and full of smart traps and dangerous boss monsters, as well as spooky ghosts and ghouls taken from ancient Japanese literature, creating a unique experience for roleplaying fans as they enter the eerie “Fantastical World” of ancient Japan. A slew of creepy monsters, such as the supernatural “Yokai” of ancient Japanese literature, await players inside the castle. Be warned!

 

Game details:

  • Real-time RPG Action: Become a Samurai or a Ninja, create a party, and venture forth to do battle, solve puzzles, defeat bosses, and explore a mysterious castle to defeat its Lord!
  • Unique Japanese Heritage: Instead of generic fantasy creatures, clash with vivid monsters and supernatural creatures from Japanese literature
  • Twice the Possibilities: Split your party of up to four players for unparalleled strategy and party options
  • Explore a Monstrous Castle: The enormous castle is filled with cunning traps—some of which can only be solved by dividing your party—and tough boss monsters, testing player instincts and judgement
  • Explore Japanese Character Classes and Races: Choose to play as a Samurai, Ninja or Monk with three distinct races on tap to add diverse skillsets to your party
  • Unique Soundtrack: The game features traditional Japanese music and ambient sound creating an environment of mystery, suspense and fear to the gameplay experience

 

Developed by Asakusa Studios, Hyakki Castle is to be published by Happinet. The game is scheduled to release for PC via Steam this winter. More game information will be shared in the near future. This game has not yet been rated by the ESRB.

 

This is a truly unique looking game, and one that merits a lot of attention. We will be covering this game more in the future,

 

Will you be getting this?

Source: PR Email

By Jessica Brown On 14 Sep, 2017 At 08:06 PM | Categorized As Featured, PC Games, Reviews, ROG News | With 0 Comments

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  • Title:  “Ancient Frontier”
  • Developer: Fair Weather Studios, LLC
  • Publisher: Fair Weather Studios, LLC
  • Genre: Sci-Fi Turn-Based Strategy
  • Platform: PC (Steam)
  • Release Date: September 21, 2017

I’m going to be very honest: turn-based strategy games, while enjoyable, are not my main area of expertise. While I certainly enjoy strategy games from time to time, they just aren’t games that I often gravitate towards and so it’s been a fair bit of time since I’ve delved deeply into one. Perhaps that’s a good thing, though, because in the case of this game it allows me to offer a pretty objective review.

At first, I wasn’t sure what to think of Ancient Frontier. I knew absolutely nothing about it and at first, when hearing the title, I thought this was going to be some sort of medieval fantasy strategy title. Well, it turns out I was quite wrong, though I think this was a very pleasant surprise.

Ancient Frontier is a science-fiction turn-based strategy title from indie developer Fair Weather Studios and is a sequel to their 2016 arcade shooter Bladestar. The game is set sometime in the distant future, long after humans managed to colonize Mars and Earth has since been lost to a catastrophic destruction (the nature of which I’ve yet to discover so far). Humans have colonized many different worlds and star systems by the time the game takes place, though the events focus on a distant region of space known primarily as “the Frontier.” This region lacks any inhabitable planets or moons but is sustained by many different starbases and mining colonies that have come out there to mine its rich mineral and energy deposits. At the offset of their campaign, players will have to choose whether they want to play as an officer in the Federation Navy or as a member of the Alliance with the story and available ships varying considerably.

The core game consists of a cinematic story (with enjoyable voice acting) presented a series of missions that the player will need to complete. Missions are divided into three types: Story, Bounty, and Simulator Missions. Story missions are, of course, the way to progress through the main events of the game. However, between each of the major story missions, you’ll have the opportunity to participate in either Bounties or Simulator runs. Bounties are essentially side-stories where you’ll participate in one of a variety of scenarios with the ability to gain experience and various resources that you’ll need to purchase or upgrade existing ships as well as research new utilities or abilities. Simulator runs will only gain your units (crew) experience points but won’t yield any resources. On the other hand, though, simulator missions don’t present any true risk (units lost during these runs will return during normal play). Bounties, though, will result in permanent loss of any units that get destroyed during them (depending on your chosen difficulty setting).

Each mission will have a different goal in mind but ultimately is presented in a uniform fashion. Players will have their units placed on a large grid that consists of hexagonal spaces. Your movement does, of course, depend on unit type. Some units will only get one move (though they may be able to traverse several spaces at once) while others may get several. The “fog of war” prevents you from seeing too far into the distance at first as well, but this is remedied through mapping out each area. The “fog” is explained as being the limit of your current long-range sensors, so you’re forced to press into an area to map it, reveal hidden resources or anomalies, and discover enemy units. The sensor range, like most other stats of a unit, can be improved with utilities you can research and purchase with resources (or salvage from destroyed enemies).

Overall, success will heavily depend on pacing as in most turn-based titles. Since each unit will get a certain number of turns as well as a certain number of actions (attack or skills), careful planning needs to go into whether you’ll want to go on an all-out assault against an enemy unit or do a hit-and-run type of maneuver (keeping in mind that debris fields and other similar things provide cover during combat). Obstacles also exist that can turn a battle very quickly, such as minefields on some maps that will cause incredible damage to any unit that ends their turn on an adjacent hex space. Optional objectives are present on each map too that will yield additional rewards if they are completed before the main objective.

The game has a fairly high level of difficulty, even if played on the Normal setting. Under normal conditions, units that are destroyed during a mission will be permanently lost, which adds to the immediacy of using effective strategies. Since resources are finite (you only have a certain number of optional deployments you can embark on), suffering too many lost units will eventually leave you with a fleet that won’t be sufficient for advancing the story. Thankfully, if that level of hardcore realism isn’t quite your thing, you can play on an easier setting that will keep the mission difficulty intact while allowing defeated units to return after completion (though any unit defeated in combat won’t gain any experience). This will allow more casual players to be able to enjoy the game without having to feel like they won’t be able to enjoy the story progression due to failed mission attempts.

Visually, the game looks quite nice. Although it typically is viewed from a rather zoomed-out perspective, you can easily rotate the camera and zoom in a decent amount to see the details in the environment and on your (and enemy) ships. As mentioned earlier, the voice-acting in the game is actually quite enjoyable, though I did find that the written dialogue could have used a little more polish (which may be addressed by the time of release). However, one thing I was really impressed with was the game’s soundtrack. There are several memorable tunes (I particularly liked the song that plays in between missions) and I really hope the developer makes the OST available as an optional purchase on Steam.

Overall, if you’re a fan of turn-based strategy titles or if you enjoy a good sci-fi narrative, Ancient Frontier is certainly worth giving a good, hard look. While it may not initially appeal to everyone (especially if you’re not generally into strategy games), I found the game to be very approachable. Once I gave it a chance I easily found myself spending two solid hours in a sitting digging deep into the game, wanting to shore up my fleet and press on in the main campaign to see where the story was going. That, I think, is a solid indicator that a game is a worthwhile investment.

ADDITIONAL SCREENSHOTS (Click for 4K):

 

A review key was provided by the developer.

By Cataclysmic Knight On 14 Sep, 2017 At 07:44 PM | Categorized As PC Games, PlayStation, Reviews, Reviews, Reviews, ROG News, Xbox 360/Xbox One | With 0 Comments

No GravatarHave you ever wondered what would happen if you combined Monty Python art and humor with Marble Madness and tower defense games? Then why the heck didn’t you play the original Rock of Ages? If you’ve never heard of Rock of Ages, welcome to the club. When I first heard of Rock of Ages II I was so hyped to try it out – I LOVE Monty Python and I love wacky games!

Title: Rock of Ages II: Bigger & Boulder
Developed By: ACE Team
Available For: PS4 (reviewed), Xbox One, Steam (Windows)

Rock of Ages II: Bigger & Boulder, from all the reviews I’ve read, lives up to its name – it’s both bigger than the original and it still involves giant boulders and hilarity. The main game plays out like this – you and your opponent have your own identical paths to throw your boulder of doom down, crushing your enemy’s obstacles and trying to retain as much boulder integrity as possible so that when you inevitably slam into your foe’s castle door you’ll do as much damage as you can.

After your boulder smashes into the enemy’s door (or if your boulder gets entirely destroyed) you’ll have to wait until another boulder is chiseled out of stone. While you wait for your next boulder you can use your currency to lay down various traps and obstacles for your enemy. Spring boards, tower walls, ballista, balloons that dangle lions that cling to enemy boulders and make them wonky, sticky cows… There are loads of options! Each one has a different value, and most of them increase in value with each one you lay down. My personal favorite is the spring board – these pop out of the ground and fling the enemy boulder in the direction the spring board is aimed, typically sending them backwards or throwing them to their doom! This not only damages the boulder, it also greatly slows them down, and in a game where 3 boulders almost always means victory that bit of extra time can really be beneficial.

The game balances the importance of laying down objectives wisely and being able to control your boulders. However, if you’re terrible at controlling the boulder (like me) you’re doomed to fail on the harder levels that involve crazy jumps (yes, of course your boulder can jump!) and tight turns. By the 6th or 7th map I was hitting the enemy’s door less than half of the time while they had no problem demolishing me.

 

The game has two main modes of play – the standard “war” and an “obstacle course” that’s essentially a race. The obstacle course is basically war without laying obstacles, and both you and your opponent(s) race the same course together. The first to three points wins, and each time the course is played in a match the obstacles get more and more crazy.

These game modes are available both online and offline. Offline you’re presented with a hilarious campaign mode, obstacle course and a time trial mode that allows you to run any course without obstacles in the hopes of getting on the online leaderboards. You can also set up your profile – you can set up your banner, change your leader and paint your ball. While the obstacle course is the same as I already explained, the campaign is where I spent most of my time.

In campaign mode, you go up against various figures – like Adam and Eve or William Wallace – and artwork – like the Scream. Each battle begins with a ridiculously funny clip that looks like something right out of Monty Python, sometimes blatantly showing off their inspiration with things like pokeballs that look like Holy Hand Grenades of Antioch (if you don’t get that reference go buy Monty Python and the Holy Grail right now and watch it immediately!). Each battle takes place on the enemy’s turf and beating them on any difficulty gives you a star, their boulder, their leader as someone you can use and a banner customization option. Stars are then used to take down gates for the game’s crazy boss battles, and whether you win the battle or not you’ll knock the tower down so you can progress (thank goodness!). As you roll around the map, you’ll also find new traps, obstacles and weapons to use against your opponent, but you’ll only have 4 slots to equip with the dozens of options until you take down the bosses and collect more slots. All of campaign mode is also playable in split-screen couch co-op, something fantastic for people like my gal and I to play together. Each side’s castle door still seems to have the same amount of health though so slowing enemies down is even more important!

Like any multiplayer game, the real fun comes when you play with other people you actually know. This includes co-op and against one another on a couch of course, but the trash talk flows even more beautifully with up to four-player online play, battling it out 2v2 in war or free-for-all with the obstacle course. For the best odds of winning you’ll want to play through the campaign first though so you can practice and unlock all the different obstacles and balls. The courses, however, are all unlocked from the second you get the game! Like most everything else in the game, you can choose which ball you use as well, and you get the vast majority of them from beating campaign levels. Some roll faster, some are more agile and some have special abilities like the paint ball that doesn’t allow your opponent to lay down new obstacles where you roll for a limited time.

While I found the game incredibly frustrating after a handful of levels, it was still a pretty hilarious time and it’s something my gal and I will have plenty of laughs with. If you enjoyed the original Rock of Ages or Monty Python, those reasons are enough to dive into Rock of Ages II.

Note: I received a code for the game from the developer in exchange for an honest review.

By Jonathan Balofsky On 14 Sep, 2017 At 11:11 AM | Categorized As News, PC Games, PlayStation, ROG News, Xbox 360/Xbox One | With 0 Comments

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Bethesda sent out the following

 

 

Take on the role of Billie Lurk, once one of Dunwall’s most notorious killers-for-hire. Reunited with your old mentor, the legendary assassin Daud, you undertake the greatest assassination ever conceived: killing the Outsider, a god-like figure whom Daud sees as instrumental in some of the Empire’s most dishonorable moments. As you venture deep into the grimiest corners of Karnaca to uncover the mystery of the Outsider and his origins, face deadly opposition, dark ancient powers, and difficult decisions that will forever change the world around you.

Death of the Outsider brings players back to the Empire of the Isles, with breathtaking visuals, intricately designed levels, and brutal combat systems that are a hallmark of the Dishonored series. With a new character comes a unique new set of supernatural abilities, deadly weapons and powerful gear, empowering players to become the ultimate assassin.

Dishonored: Death of the Outsider launch worldwide on September 15, 2017 on PlayStation 4, Xbox One and PC. For more information about the game, visit dishonored.bethesda.net

 

 

 

Dishonored: Death of the Outsider looks absolutely amazing. This looks like a worthy continuation of the series and will no doubt be another great entry. Will you be getting it?

 

 

Source: Bethesda PR

By otakuman5000 On 14 Sep, 2017 At 03:15 AM | Categorized As PC Games, ROG News | With 0 Comments

No GravatarEvery once in a while, a game comes along and combines elements of some of your favorite games and creates something new. Enter French indie developer Ediogames. They have created a mash up like none other. It is a 2D platforming Action/Fighting game with 2 teams, 6 player battles, and a multitude of weapons and destructible environments.

Imagine a blend between Castle Crashers, Worms,
Team Fortress 2 and SuperSmash Brothers, 
Free to play with wacky characters and so many 
weapons and character customization you will never
see the end of it!

The game is out now on Steam. Here is the trailer: