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Earlier this year, Double Dragon IV was released on PC and PS4 and then later Nintendo Switch ( the system the game was played on for this review). It was a deliberate throwback to the NES Double Dragon games, in contrast to Double Dragon Neon, and received some mixed reception. I wasn’t sure what to fully expect as I began playing, as I went in fearing the worst. What I found however, was a decent throwback that may have been treated a bit unfairly.

It has been argued that Double Dragon IV is too deliberate a throwback to the NES games, to the point of also including everything bad about them. I disagree however, as while Double Dragon IV does have some flaws due to its style, I feel the game is better than most are giving it credit for. I enjoyed playing this retro style beat em up and found myself liking some of the changes that were made. The controls, while still stiff and not perfectly responsive, have a lot more variety to them. It now feels like a more complete beat em up from the past that takes cues from gaming today, as the extra buttons allow new moves and new combo attacks. This really does help set this game aside from its predecessors.

There are a number of flaws of course. The stiffness of the controls can really throw off the jumps that are required to be done in the game, and the jumping mechanic in general is not suited to platforming. I would say this is one thing that was a mistake to retain. As well, the story, while nice at times, takes a turn at the end that made me just say “Really? This is what you are going with?”, it was just nostalgia not being used right. Not to mention that some of the attempts at variety just come off as lazy nostalgia, its not bad, but its not great.

That being said, I did have a lot of fun playing the game, far more than I ever thought I would. Despite the flaws, I feel Double Dragon IV is actually a really good game. It is far better than it was made out to be, and deserves an honest chance. I recommend it.

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Well this is an interesting one. I was not sure what to expect with This is The Police, and was interested in what I would see. What I did see was a game that blended genres and ideas, sometimes well, and sometimes not so well. This is the Police is a blend of noir style crime drama, and a management sim game. This was certainly a different experience, but was it a good experience?

This is the Police tells the story of the last days of a police chief dogged by allegations of corruption and failure. What you do in those last 180 days determines the future of the department and this is where things get interesting. The meat of the game is obviously the management parts, and the game does offer some interesting choices you will have to make. This includes embracing or shunning corruption, or even playing things out quietly.

There is a lot of variety in the game and the choices do offer a great deal of replay value, unlike some other games filled with choices. This is of course fitting, seeing as this is a strategy/management simulation, but the amount of replay options is still a great incentive for the game. However, here we come to an issue because at times, the game seems to be pushing you in a direction/choice even if you do not want to do so. I attribute this to the blending of genres, but while it doesn’t always work, when it does, it works beautifully.

The moral choices to be made and the consequences are the highlight of the game. The narrative is extremely well done and actually makes you feel invested. I am reluctant to share details of what the plot involves, other than dealing with the mafia and the sheer state of chaos and severe tensions, political and racial, that are occurring in the streets. For a strategy/management simulation, this game goes to some very dark places, and this is where the blending does succeed.

Overall, while uneven, This is the Police is an overall good product. It forces you to actually make deep moral choices and then makes you explore the consequences. There is enough content here to last for several playthroughs and that gets high points form me. This is one to check out.

 

Disclaimer: A review key was provided

By Stark Wyvern On 26 Nov, 2017 At 03:06 PM | Categorized As NINTENDO, Nintendo Switch, PC Games, PlayStation, Reviews, Reviews, Reviews, ROG News | With 0 Comments

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Battle Chef Brigade is an amazing game that is being pushed by Adult Swim Games. This amazing game is simply one of those games that comes along and just mixes genres so well, while also looking so good. Seeing this game for the first time, I couldn’t help but adore this amazing game. It just has this amazing look to it that really, makes me smile. In Battle Chef Brigade, you play as either Mina Han, a human, or Thrash an orc like fellow. Both characters have their own motivations, and are both very deep in their own regard. Both also want to join the Battle Chef Brigade and join up with a tournament along with the other competitors.

The Battle Chef Brigade is a group that helps to heal the world by taking down monsters, and cooking. There are tournaments every few years that ensure the Brigade will continue to have members. It is really interesting seeing these characters appear in the story as they really are all so unique. Every character has their own motivations for joining and you can really see that they all really do want this just as much as the next. The characters are also super different, and I really enjoy seeing them come into the game. These characters are truly their own, and that is something special. From the stoic and intelligent Kirin, to the David Bowie-esque Ziggy, these characters all steal the show with their own ways of doing things.

The game itself is just such a blast, and for me that is interesting as I’m not always such a fan of match 3 style games. Though, this game really turns it up a notch by making it about cooking. For me, cooking is something that is quite fun, so  I really enjoy cooking by matching. This puzzle system isn’t the only thing that makes this game unique though.  Of course to cook, you will certainly need ingredients to make and what is the way to get them, fighting monsters.

Fighting monsters in this game is done in a beautifully done way as you run and jump your way to get ingredients. There are different monsters to take down, from little birds called Cheepchi, all the way up to huge dragons. This makes for ingredient hunting to be different depending on what you need to gather. All of these ingredients also will help you cook, by giving you new pieces to match and that is a good thing.

The true marriage of puzzle and monster hunting comes together in cooking battles. In these battles which the character must win seven of to win a seat in the Brigade things heat up. There are different types of cooking that need to be done, and different elements of wind, water, and fire need to be present in differing degrees to win. In these contests you will face all sorts of opponents, and some will not shy away from sabotage. Everyone wants to win, and some really don’t care how they do so. As you cook, and match, you will be forced to kill monstes to increase your chance of winning. You will have to gather certain ingredients that each dish must have. The judges will judge your dish for completion of their wishes and it gets nervewracking as they deliberate. But, serve them what they want, and they will be happy, that is all a chef really needs, right?

Battle Chef Brigade has a robust set of other trials to enjoy, in jobs within the game. Some will have you solving puzzles which really do get increasingly harder. There are also quests for ingredients which can be tedious. Endless puzzles are also par for the course, and you will find yourself freaking out as four customers come in at once. This game in its crazy way of using puzzles, makes you feel like you really are working in a restaurant and that is a special thing.

After completing the story or for more difference, you are welcome to try the other modes. Within this game there are two other modes, one simply being an endless kitchen puzzler. In this you must match the dishes to the patrons through having the right layout. This gets stressful as of course in this you can have up to four puzzles going at once. With both easy and hard modes, this will certainly test your mettle. There are also challenges that will test your platforming and monster hunting. Both of these game modes don’t affect the story so using them may teach you a thing or two to win the true game.

There also surprisngly daily challenges which you need to connect to the internet to attempt. In this mode you choose either Thrash the Orc, or Mina the human, and are thrust into battles where everything you have been taught comes to play. You play against others on a leaderboard, and hope to get the best food rating. This is crazy as the scores are actually quite high in this mode, and I honestly haven’t attained something over 350 yet so to see 600+ is unnerving. But, this is simply just another way to lengthen the game and I think its amazing. You will always have a new challenge and that is always a good thing.

Battle Chef Brigade is truly a special game. One that you will certainly enjoy if you like hand drawn anime styled games. There truly is something about this game that makes it truly shimmer and shine like a jewel. If this game looks at all interesting, I highly suggest buying it. Play it, enjoy it, make dishes and watch a magic story unfold. The artwork is amazing and the characters are all their own. Buy it today and start cooking, you know you’d want to be in this Brigade!

 

 

Disclaimer: A review key was provided

No GravatarBattle Chasers: Nightwar is a game that promises turn-based old-school RPG battles, crafting, exploration and randomly generated dungeons with multiple difficulty levels. But do these elements embrace the glory of old-school RPG glory, or feel dated and old?

Title: Battle Chasers: Nightwar
Developer: Airship Syndicate
Available For: PS4, Steam (Windows/Mac), Xbox One, Switch

Battle Chasers: Nightwar kicks off with an epic air battle that crashes your ship and strands you on an island. You’re told that the aggressors that took you down and nearly killed you were random pirates, but the longer you’re there the more you learn of a deeper, wicked plot that must be stopped, and pirates are actually the least of your problems!

The game draws inspiration from the “90’s cult comic book” as well as the glory days of turn-based RPGs. Everything you’d expect from an RPG is here – turn-based battle, various equipment, grinding for experience and loot, side quests and even a fishing minigame – and while most of these don’t offer much new, the incredibly polished, gorgeous art makes up for it. Normally I couldn’t care less about art in a game, but the art here is stunning, the animations smooth and sharp, and even 30+ hours into the game I was amazed at how much I focused on watching the good guys and bad guys attack one another.

Because it’s what you’ll spend most of your time doing, the battle system is the cornerstone of Battle Chasers. I played nearly every RPG that existed on the NES, SNES and PS1-2, and while I used to love grinding out levels and getting that next piece of loot, the advent of action-RPGs made me nervous that I wouldn’t enjoy a turn-based RPG anymore. I was pleasantly surprised that the way Battle Chasers handles it, I still really enjoyed it! You’ll only ever fight enemies when you run into them on the screen, and one enemy on the screen is always exactly one actual enemy to fight; often when you get near them there will be a chain icon above two or three of them, and touching one initiates combat with all of them at once. This makes it so that you always know what you’ll be up against and allows you to plan accordingly. Each of your three-person party also has limited use dungeon skills that allow you to have an upper hand before entering battle: Calibretto the ancient war mech, for example, Calibretto can fire a bullet at an enemy and weaken them a bit before you even start combat. Gully can smash the ground, making nearby enemies stunned at the beginning of the battle. She also has a skill called “Stoneskin” that adds a little defense while making party members immune to damage from traps in the dungeon temporarily. These skills can really come in handy against the more difficult dungeon foes, and they can even be used to avoid damage from dungeon traps while exploring.

Once you touch an enemy, a turn-based battle begins. Based on speed/haste, allies and foes take turns battling. Each ally gets one action a turn and has two different sets of options to choose from – Actions and Abilities. The Actions are instant and typically generate overcharge, whereas the Abilities use up overcharge/mana. Overcharge is an incredibly unique twist and it definitely added a layer of strategy to battles. Each character has a max amount of mana, but they can also gain overcharge which is used in place of mana. So if you want to use an attack that uses 20 mana and have 30 overcharge, you won’t touch your actual mana reserves whatsoever. Unless you’ve selected skills that retain overcharge between battles, this amount goes away after each battle so there’s no reason not to use it when you can! The other side of this coin is that while the Actions are instant, the Abilities range from “Very Fast” to “Slow”, meaning the bigger, more epic attacks may take a while and allow enemies to attack first. Even the “Very Fast” attacks technically count as another turn, which can be beneficial when you have a buff that heals you every turn or negative when you have a debuff that hurts you every turn. Finally, there’s a Boost meter that’s shared by all available party members, and as the battle goes on it fills up. You can get this up to three tiers of boost, and each character has boost abilities that use between 1-3 tiers. These range from healing the entire party to doing massive damage, so it’s vital to have it as full as possible for a big boss fight!

After each battle you’ll gain experience (which is split evenly between all 3 characters currently in your party), gold and sweet, sweet loot. Most of this loot is used for crafting and selling, but sometimes you’ll just get a straight-up piece of gear. While there isn’t a huge loot pool, crafting and loot become more interesting through the use of rarities – most pieces of gear can be either standard, heroic or legendary, and each level of rarity adds to the attack/defense/etc of it. While crafting, each item has a minimal requirement, but if you add more of those items you can raise your odds of successfully crafting an item from 100-300%, with each 100% adding a level of rarity. You can also try to make something with as few as a 1-2% chance of success but, as you’d expect, if it fails you’ll lose your crafting materials.

The meat of the game takes place inside one of the game’s eight dungeons. Each dungeon is randomly generated to some extent, but the overall goals, potential enemies and boss are the same. As you explore you’ll come across loot, light puzzles, lore (text) and enemies. At the beginning of each dungeon you can choose your difficulty – Normal or Heroic – and once you’ve completed the dungeon the first time you can re-run it on Legendary difficulty. Legendary difficulty not only has higher level enemies, it also resets if you get wiped out (Normal or Heroic  merely return you to the Inn and Tavern, fully healed with some gold missing, and you can easily return to the boss fight any time). After the boss is completed you’ll get a random loot box based on the difficulty, but the real reward is the experience – the higher difficulty enemies are vital as experience drops off rather quickly once you’re a level or two above the enemies.

As with any good RPG, Battle Chasers offers up side quests. While you’re exploring the overworld you’ll come across several places that just can’t be finished at the time, and returning later can grant some great rewards. These are often hinted at through varying hunts that have you tracking down some special, difficult side boss for unique, specific rewards. These also often have specific requirements to “summon” them, like lighting lots of torches with single-use, rare flint or exploring for hidden triggers at a cemetery. The more I played, the harder these hunts became, and I even got entirely stomped on by one or two of the bosses which is VERY reminiscent of the hidden bosses in older RPGs.

Unfortunately, these side-quests really don’t grant a great deal of experience, so the vast majority of the game so far has been exploring, doing what I can, beating a dungeon, returning to town to rest and sell extra loot, returning to the same dungeon and beating it on legendary difficulty, returning to town to sell stuff, and then repeating in the next area. This got old pretty quick, especially when I was expecting lots of side quests and unique things to do, and has me worried for the remaining 3 dungeons since each dungeon has required more and more grinding before successfully beating it. Will I have to run the same dungeon on Legendary 2-3 times in a row for the last couple dungeons? Older dungeons also don’t get any tougher with your levels, so if you’ve already beaten the second dungeon there’s no reason to go back to the first aside from completing your bestiary.

The bestiary was a nice touch. When you first encounter an enemy their HP and upcoming attacks are unknown, marked by question marks. However, as you defeat the same enemy repeatedly you’ll get to see these specifics, so you’ll know if your attack that does 80 damage will finish them off before they do their crazy charged attack or not. Killing even more of the same enemy (or any enemies of a particular type or a particular area) grant bonuses to your entire party, like those shown above. This at least gives you some reason to go back to old areas if you haven’t completed one of these challenges, and it guarantees a slight boost to different stats for your entire party as you continue throughout the game.

Speaking of the characters, you quickly get a party of three and then discover other party members who you can swap out until you’ve gathered all six. You’ll only gain experience for the three currently in your party, however, so if you really want all six characters to be equally powerful you’ll need to grind twice as long. While I tried swapping characters out a bit, I ended up sticking to the original 3 since grinding was getting dull as it was. You’re also only allowed to change characters at very limited times – while entering a dungeon and while at the Inn and Tavern for example – and you can’t check the skills or equipment of characters not in your party, so I often sold items that would have been beneficial to them, but by that point my main 3 characters were a good 4 or 5 levels ahead of the rest anyway. Each of the characters is interesting, and as someone who never read the original comics it was interesting learning about them. I really liked that the main character is a girl named Gully who’s a little badass and isn’t the one who heals the party (oddly enough, the giant war mech Calibretto is!). I was loving all of the characters until the fifth: a woman named Red Monika. Normally she’d probably have been my favorite – she’s a rogue fugitive who’s quick with a gun and constantly on the lookout for fame and fortune. However, her character is also barely covered with clothing, to such an extent that I’d be embarrassed if anyone caught her on the screen. As such, I purposely never put her in my party and never got to hear her wit in the heat of battle, which is a real shame. Surely this isn’t the developer’s fault as the characters were already designed, but I still wish I could’ve thrown a robe on her or something!

However, while the game was fun overall, the worst part of all was just how often it crashed. The first time it happened I had just finished a dungeon and was paranoid the autosave hadn’t kicked in, so I would have to redo at least the brutal boss fight. I was so relieved when I found out that wasn’t the case – getting back into the game put me back on the main menu with all of my hard fought loot. This was far from the only crash though – crashes were so frequent that every time I returned to the overworld map from dungeons and small areas I was paranoid it would happen again. I never lost progress, thank goodness, but crashes had other terrible effects – every time the game starts you’re forced to watch a good 10-30 seconds of the intro movie before it can be skipped, and then the first several battles take a while to load (sometimes upwards of 10-20 seconds each!). The longer you play, the less time the battles take to load until they’re instant, but if you have to restart the game every two or three hours those load times can get rather brutal. [Reviewer note: I quickly tested the game out after a month of updates since this review was written and noticed the battle load times have been entirely removed, which is AWESOME! I haven’t been able to test for crashes, but the intro movie still takes just as long to skip.]

Overall I did have a good time with Battle Chasers. I still plan on playing and finishing it, and even now I’m itching to grind enough to beat another hunt. The game utilizes strategy far more than I’d have expected: one boss annihilated me my first try, then I went in again (without any leveling up) and destroyed him with a better strategy. It’s also amazing that this was a Kickstarter game, and it’s easily the best Kickstarter title I’ve ever played as far as I’m aware of. As soon as the glitches are fixed, this will definitely be a game to check out, especially if you’re itching for the good old days of RPGs.

 

Disclaimer: A review key was provided by the publisher

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I love classic style turn based RPGs. There is something about them that just takes me back to an older era and lets me enjoy myself without worrying about all new combat mechanics ( for the most part), and one company that makes this style of game still is KEMCO. I noted in my review of their game Revenant Saga that KEMCO had begun to move out of their paint by numbers approach to making RPGs. While the games they made are great, they had a problem of being formulaic and not deviating much. They were fun to play and lose yourself in for hours but eventually they all became the same. Revenant Saga brought some refreshing change and now Antiquia Lost pushes them further in that new direction.

Antiquia Lost follows a bit of the typical KEMCO formula but plays with it so much, that it becomes new. The game eschews the 3D battle screens KEMCO has been using lately, in favor of a classic 16 bit style battle screen. Its a nice touch and helps the general feeling of the game :making . I must also note that the visuals are surprisingly excellent on Switch, with the art looking sharper than in previous games. I must say though, that I am not happy about the miscrotransactions being in the console versions, as it feels like a step back from KEMCO’s work with consoles. Still they can be ignored, but locking some staples behind a paywall doesn’t feel right.

Antiquia Lost introduces new play mechanics as well, but keeps them grounded in their previous games and they don’t feel overwhelming. I do like that the way the characters interact is different, and using a different character is much more involved this time. The story of the game also immediately deviates from KEMCO’s normal pattern and I must commend them for that. Right away we are given an experience that uses what KEMCO utilized before, but doesn’t stay firmly in the past. Instead, Antiquia Lost takes what was done and uses those ideas to chart a new path, and it is a most excellent journey. It doesn’t overwhelm you and it is familiar enough while still being a fresh experience. Even with the flaw of microtransactions, I recommend it.

 

 

Disclaimer: A review key was provided by KEMCO

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No one did arcade games like SNK with the Neo Geo. Everything with them was on a completely different level than the rest of the industry, with games that were both intense and fun. Sports games on the Neo Geo often took sports that didn’t seem like they would action packed and made it work, like with Neo Turf Masters. So imagine what they could do with Soccer/Football, a game known for its passionate fans.

Soccer Brawl was like an early predecessor to later games like Sega’s Soccer Slam and Super Mario Strikers/Mario Smash Football. It was less of a sports game, rather than an action game that used sports as basis for the action. The game is set in the future with soccer that is played with bionic people or cyborgs as the players. And with that description, how can this not be awesome?

Soccer Brawl is is a two-player game where your team is representing one of eight countries,. These countries are Germany, Japan, Brazil, The United States, Italy, Spain, England and South Korea. After selecting a team, you will then select one of two stadiums which will be a dome or an open field. Then you begin with a 5-on-5 match and the action gets intense. Forget all the rules for the game, because in this, there are no fouls and anything goes. This makes the game much closer to an intense brawler than you would expect.

Many cite Midway’s arcade sports games as being the games that defined what an arcade style sports game should be. Those people should look instead to SNK and games like this, because Soccer Brawl makes NBA Jam look tame in comparison. SNK threw out any pretense of realism and made it all about fun and action. This is a game that sadly hasn’t received the attention it deserves. Neo Turf Masters is well known ( deservedly so) and I cannot understand why Soccer Brawl doesn’t also get as much attention. Every modern sports game that uses arcade style action to differentiate itself ends up owing something to this game. I urge you all to check it out as it has just been released via Arcade Archives on modern systems. This is a damn good game, and one that I would love to see SNK revisit in the future.  It is too good to just be left in the past.

 

 

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A couple of years ago, Bethesda and Machine Games released Wolfenstein The New Order. It was a bold new take on the series and helped give it new life in the modern era. Now Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus has been released, but does it up the intensity or fall flat?

 

The first thing I noticed when playing The New Colossus is how gorgeous the game looks. This is one of the best looking games this year and makes full use of the resources it has available to itself. I cannot stress this enough, but Machine Games upped the ante in terms of presentation, and I applaud them for it. Along with that, there is an amazing soundtrack that works so well with the action that occurs. It just fits perfectly even as the scenarios change and this just adds to Wolfenstein’s enjoyablity factor

But now it is time to talk about the gameplay and wow is it amazing.  I did notice a few framerate stutters here and there but nothing too major. Playing this on the PS4 was an enjoyable time, and before I knew it, hours had passed.Wolfenstein II gives us multiple ways to take down Nazis and crush them in the name of the resistance, and therein lies the bizarre controversy of the game. For some reason people are offended that Nazis are the villains of the game and that is just strange to hear in this day and age. If anyone would be uncomfortable about anything in the game, it should be the sheer horror of a world where the Nazis won. Admittedly this did in fact bother me a little bit as the grandchild of holocaust survivors, and alternate history fiction like this does give me pause, but I am able to look past it and see the game for what it is.

Wolfenstein II is packed with content, both immediately visible and also hidden for you to find. I do not want to give spoilers, but I enjoyed finding all the secrets the game had to offer. I must admit, if it were not for the framerate issues I mentioned above, I would find this game perfect. I understand that some have issue with the game not having multiplayer modes, but I actually like that the focus was on single player gameplay. DOOM’s multiplayer felt like an ill fit for the game, so I am glad the focus and polish went solely into making a great campaign.

If there is anything I would change though, it is the pacing as the game feels like it slows down too much at times in terms of progression nd advancing in the plot. Again, this is not a deal-breaker and I still love the game. I was wary of this reboot from the beginning due to my family’s experience in World War 2, but these games are so well done, that I have been won over. I highly recommend this game.

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I will admit right away that survival games are not a genre I have played very much of. There is no real reason, I simply have not been interested in it, until now. The Flame in the Flood is a game that provides both a good entry point and a good challenge at the same time.

The game is set in a world where rising water ha flooded the world. Into this world, we have Scout and her dog Daisy who must survive while trying to find a radio tower. Their journey will take them to different areas in this procedurally generated world, and find what they need to survive. It seems daunting at first but the game doesn’t make things too hard and instead eases you into things, while giving glimpses into what happened in the world. This helps create a better atmosphere, while also advancing the story and giving more direction. I have no faults with that and appreciate the way it kept things interesting.

I do have some issues, with how the pacing did feel strange at times, and the major issue is inventory space. It does create problems, especially a the start and that could make the game seem worse than it really is. That is a shame, because the game does have a lot going for it, even if you spend so much time going through the various menus. If you can get through this rough start, however, you will see a game with a realized world, interesting environments, as well as beautiful visuals.

The game also must be noted for its amazing soundtrack, and I had to stop every so often just to take in more of the music and appreciate it far more. It isn’t often that happens to me to anymore, so I always get a little excited when it does. Good music is something that needs to be appreciated in gaming.

Overall, I am still not very interested in survival games, but I must say that The Flame in the Flood did a lot to make me appreciate the genre more. If you like survival games, or are curious about them, this is one you should keep an eye on.

 

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Disclaimer: A review key was provided by the developer

 

By Stark Wyvern On 25 Oct, 2017 At 05:11 PM | Categorized As News, PC Games, PlayStation, Reviews, Reviews, ROG News, Xbox 360/Xbox One | With 0 Comments

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Survival horror has gone through many changes over the years, but with the Evil Within 2, we have a true return to form for the genre. This is a game that will not only test your mettle, but will in fact scare you, or at least make a you a jump a few countless times. Created by the great Shinji Makami, this game is certainly one that you will enjoy if you the genre, and playing this game in the month of October will certainly help in making your Halloween time that much more horrifying.

In this game you play as a man named Sebastian Castellanos who is out looking for his daughter Lily who was abducted years before. He tracks her down to this crazy place called the Union, where things are definitely not what they seem. Sebastian has a lot of baggage concerning his daughter as clearly he wasn’t always the best dad, and he just wants to find her now, but really has no idea where she could actually be. With this idea in his head, he must also face villainous monsters who want nothing more than to kill him. There is also the threat of Lily not being all that happy to see him when he does find her.

This game, is great because it allows you to play as you want. You can of course go in guns blazing and kill all the enemies on sight. Which isn’t always the best way to go about it, because some of your foes will be quite sneaky. You can also of course, if possible sneak around. Being careful always has its advantages as you don’t want to go in to hot and waste ammo. You can also craft in this game, which is an interesting and modern addition. In the game you can craft anywhere, and make things to assist you on your journey. Or you can use a workbench, which while harder to come by, will lessen your use of crafting items. It is a good balancer for crafting as you will have to use your own judgement. While it might be easier to craft anywhere, if you know it will use too much you’ll be forced to strategize and wait for the work bench.

There are also side quests in which you can gain other items which are scarce. This is another solid mechanic as you can always use more items to take on the foes you may come across. Plus, who doesn’t like taking on quests to hold off completing the main story. There is even customization for your character through the use of Green gel. There is a skill tree which is broken into five sections or health, stealth, combat, recovery, and athleticism. Putting your points to the right skills will make your game your own, and customization always is a good thing. You can even upgrade weapons with parts you may find, adding to further increase your firepower.

Sebastian is an excellent character to play as, and you really feel for him. Having to lose your daughter at any age is difficult and knowing that she is actually still alive makes it all the worse. He knows that deep down he wasn’t there for her as much as he could have been and that he lost her mother too. Losing both wife and daughter in one fell swoop would make any man go the distance to find his lost but living daughter. Playing through this game, I really felt that if he could turn back time, he would change his ways and be there for his family.

This game is a great one, and is packed with at least three playthroughs of content. Casual mode, which is what the creator of the game suggests, is actually the best one to start with as it will ease you in. Though I’m sure there will be many who will jump right in with Survival or Nightmare. This game really has something for all who dare attempt it, anyone who loves this type of game should find a difficulty setting perfect for them.

This game certainly is horrifying in a way that I have not experienced since I played Resident Evil 4. Now, I don’t play many Survival Horror Games as often as I’d like. This game has me feeling exactly like I did when I first played Resident Evil 4. Feeling totally lost and all alone, not knowing what was coming. My blood pumping as  I walk through derelict places and have to hold my own, not knowing if I’d find bullets soon. This game is something that puts me back to the time, where I was trying out my first survival horror game, and the true fear that I experienced back then. While I may have improved in my gaming, there is something apparently integral to this genre that will always scare me shitless and for that I am so thankful.

Though this game is infinitely also much more improved than Resident Evil 4, as there is true stealth. Now, not only do I feel like I can be a ghost and dodge enemies if need be, I also fear that I will be detected and immediately killed on sight. The enemies are fantastically frightening in their own rights as are the bosses. This game is one that keeps me on the edge of my seat as I roam its land, and that is a great part of this genre.

Evil Within 2, is an awesome game and one that will really test you wits. Heading around the Union, completing side quests, killing monsters, and maybe getting a little freaked out are all par for the course. Will you help Sebastian find his daughter, or will this all turn out for naught? Find out when you play Evil Within 2 for Playstation, Steam, and Xbox One!

 

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Reviewed on PS4

Disclaimer: Bethesda provided a review code

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Games made as licensed tie-ins to movies have a certain reputation of not being particularly good. And then there are instances where a movie that was not particularly good gets a gam adaptation, which can be cause for worry. However, every so often we come across a licensed game that is actually good, such as the classic Goldeneye 007 on N64. This year saw the release of the reboot of “The Mummy” franchise, and while that movie is sadly best left forgotten, I am happy to report that the same is not true of the tie in game.

The Mummy: Demastered  is a throwback to classic gaming, particularly Super Metroid and Contra, with elements of Casltevania as well as WayForward’s DS game Aliens: Infestation. Like in the latter game, if your marine is killed, you start over with a new marine from your last save point. However, here the difference is twofold in that there is no limit to the amount of lives and also that you can kill your zombified former character to recover your gear.

It is strange, but this feels less like a movie tie in game, than a game that just happens to take inspiration from the ideas in the movie. This is a very good thing, as it means the game is not held down by anything and can just go all in on being a great game. As noted above, the game takes a lot of inspiration from the classics, and I daresay this is one of the best metroidvanias made in recent years. The atmosphere is tense, like in Super Metroid, and the enemies and powerups are used well as tools to expand the game, rather than just being powerups. The openness of the game, is combined with a claustrophobic feeling that truly helps create an amazing atmosphere for the game.

On Nintendo Switch, the game makes excellent use of the HD rumble and this comes in handy more than might be expected. I have to say that WayForward did things that one wouldn’t expect, and I do not want to give away spoilers about that. I will note that many complain about the game being too difficult, and say that it is hard, but it is also very fair at the same time. It doesn’t put cheap challenges in your way, and gives you multiple ways to make it through. This is just a well done masterpiece and a brilliant example of a licensed game done right. I fully recommend this!

 

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Reviewed on Nintendo Switch

Disclaimer: WayForward provided a review code.