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By Jonathan Balofsky On 15 Mar, 2017 At 09:07 PM | Categorized As News, NINTENDO, Nintendo Switch, ROG News | With 0 Comments

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Here is an interesting development. Telltale will be supporting the Switch as we know, but there hasn’t been any confirmation on what they will be bringing. That said, a leak may have just shown us what may be coming.

A Russian retailer has listed Batman: The Telltale Series for the Switch. The listing also comes with boxart complete with the Switch logo and the style of the Switch box.

Other retailers have also begun to list the game for Switch. UK stores ozgameshop and 365games also are showing a listing of a Switch version of the game.

Hopefully we receive an announcement sooner rather than later.

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By otakuman5000 On 17 Dec, 2016 At 02:25 PM | Categorized As Comics/Manga, Featured, Indie Spotlight, News, ROG News | With 0 Comments

No GravatarI had the pleasure of exchanging emails with the creators of the new indie comic Godhand, and boy, do they have a story to tell. Conrad Iwanicki is the writer of the comic and the artist is Ronald Nelson. Together, they have with a uniquely compelling story about a deeply “flawed” individual, along the lines of Deadpool and Batman.  Please take the time to check it out. What drives Conrad was the suicide of his mom, who is a Disabled Veteran two years ago.

KICKSTARTER CAMPAIGN LAUNCHED FOR “GODHAND” Partial Proceeds to Benefit Veteran Mental Health Organization, Give An Hour Sneads Ferry, NC, December 16, 2016– Effective immediately, the official Kickstarter campaign has been launched for ‘Godhand’, a graphic novel. A relevant story propelled by an average guy going through the mundane motions of the corporate world. The lead antagonist, Bryce Powers (i.e. “Godhand”) finds himself at a fork in the road where he ultimately becomes the anti-hero. Written to substantiate that all who walk this world aren’t out of redemption’s reach, “Godhand” touches on a variation of descriptions: contemptuous, witty, poignant, cheeky, and harrowing. This graphic novel written by first-time author Conrad Iwanicki and illustrated by established American Manga artist Ronald Nelson, known for his work on (H)afrocentric, is, above-all-else, relatable, significant and noteworthy amongst modern comic literature and prose. While the ultimate objective is to self-publish and create a franchise with staying power, the story behind “Godhand” is both somber and inspiring. Iwanicki found the inspiration to create “Godhand” upon the recent suicide of his mother, Carrie Iwanicki [1962-2014]. A veteran of the United States military, she found herself in a compromising position, one familiar to countless veterans of our armed forces: lacking proper mental health care, disheartened, disconnected, suicidal. Page | 2 “My mom had a heart the size of the ocean, she truly lived to help others. Her suicide was senseless and fairly ironic considering a person that would help anyone couldn’t get the help she needed. With the success of ‘Godhand’, not only can I continue her legacy of selflessness, but hopefully I can do my part to stem the tide of 22 veteran suicides a day, so no other son or daughter has to experience the needless loss and sorrow I have.” -Conrad Iwanicki, Author Piecing together his personal relationship with the effects of the mental health of those who so selflessly give their services to our country and their families, Iwanicki will be donating proceeds from “Godhand” to the non-profit organization Give an Hour, “a national network of mental health care providers who give an hour of their time each week to help members of the military and their families cope with the “unseen wounds” associated with military service.” [www.giveanhour.org] A sample of dialogue and concept art can be obtained and viewed, respectively, at the website, www.godhandcomic.com. This project is in need of immediate funding to successfully reach its ultimate potential; more information on “Godhand” and how you can help is available on the Kickstarter campaign page now: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1092670955/godhand-a-graphicnovel/description.

Please check it out and share this article with any veterans in your family. The free sample of the story can be found here.  Also check out and donate to Give an Hour.

Here are some concept art:godhand-bryce-turnarounds-page-001_1_orig godhand-punch1 godhand

No GravatarThe good folks over at Smosh Games have put out an honest trailer for Batman Arkham City where they both praise and poke fun at one of the best Batman games ever made. Take a look below and enjoy the laughs and insight.

 

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Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment and Telltale Games have announced a new title today. Batman – The Telltale Series is set to release in August for digital download for PC/Mac, consoles, iOS, and Android. On September 16, the game will release on a “season pass disc.” The physical copy of the game will include the first five episodes of the series and will credit the disc owner with digital downloads of the next four episodes which will be available at a later date. The art style of the game will resemble comic book art through a very distinct cel shading process and will be voiced by the top voice actors in the game industry, most notably Troy Baker as Bruce Wayne. Other voice talents include: Travis Willingham as Harvey Dent, Erin Yvette as Vicki Vale, Enn Reitel as Alfred Pennyworth, Murphy Guyer as Lieutenant James Gordon, Richard McGonagle as Carmine Falcone, and Laura Bailey as Selina Kyle.

By Jonathan Balofsky On 20 Dec, 2015 At 07:25 PM | Categorized As News, News, PlayStation, ROG News, Xbox 360/Xbox One | With 0 Comments

No GravatarIn the final DLC release for Arkham Knight for 2015, Rocksteady Games showed off a variety of new content coming to the game including a Skin based on Christian Bale from the Dark Knight trilogy. They also seem to be hinting at something new coming in the future. What is it? We can’t wait to find out.

 

No GravatarWonder Woman

The casting choice for Wonder Woman in Superman v. Batman: Dawn of Justice was met with a lot of skepticism. Gal Gadot was an interesting choice to play Wonder Woman to say at the very least.

With this picture, I think Zack Snyder quieted many of those that were upset by the choice. Gal Gadot definitely stepped up to the plate as Wonder Woman!

Wonder Woman

What do you think of Gal Gadot as Wonder Woman now that we’ve seen her in the role? Let us know in the comments!

No GravatarKhalDrogo

Another character has been cast for Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice and Justice League – Jason Momoa as Aquaman!

For any of you that are fans of the Game of Thrones series, you’ll recognize Jason Momoa as Khal Drogo! He performed amazingly in Game of Thrones so I have faith that he’ll do well as Aquaman.

Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice will hit theatres on May 6, 2016.

How do you feel about Jason Momoa as Aquaman? How do you feel about Aquaman being cast? Let us know in the comments!

By Amy McGarey On 16 Apr, 2014 At 06:18 AM | Categorized As Comics/Manga, Featured, Reviews | With 1 Comment

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As part of the 75th anniversary celebration of Batman, a new comic book series called Batman Eternal debuted last Wednesday. This series will last 60 issues and be written by a revolving team of all-star Batman writers including John Layman, Scott Snyder, James Tynion IV, Ray Fawkes, Kyle Higgins and Tim Seeley. Batman Eternal will work alongside the regular Batman series, which is also written by Scott Snyder. Batman #28 serves as an introduction to this new series.

In Batman Eternal #1, we see Commissioner Gordon battling head to head with Professor Pyg. Gordon makes a mistake while trying to apprehend one of his henchmen and causes a disaster of epic proportions. Batman can’t even save Gordon from the wrath of the corrupt Major Forbes. We’re also introduced to a new transfer cop from Detroit, Jason Bard, who seems to represent a younger Jim Gordon – someone who believes that Gotham City is worth fighting for.

With Gordon off the grid, I’m excited to see how Batman’s relationship with the Gotham City Police will survive. Will Jason Bard be Batman’s new go-to man? Are Batman’s allies going to be picked off one by one? Batman Eternal is well worth picking up. The first issue already has some movie-worthy scenes which further the battle between light and dark in Gotham. This first issue was written by Scott Snyder and James Tynion IV with art by Jason Fabok.

 

 

By Tiffany Marshall On 18 Jan, 2014 At 12:56 PM | Categorized As Comics/Manga, Movie News, News, ROG News | With 0 Comments

No GravatarBatman vs Superman

Warner Bros. announced that Batman vs. Superman will debut on May 6, 2016 instead of its intended July 17, 2015 date.

Unfortunately, this doesn’t surprise me as this movie went from being a mash up of two favorited heroes to somehow becoming a Justice League-esque movie.  With Gal Gadot being cast as Wonder Woman and rumors of possible Flash cameos, there’s a lot of confusion around what exactly this movie is – Batman vs. Superman or just a rushed attempt at a Justice League movie without properly setting up our beloved heroes.

Although I am skeptical of this movie’s success at the moment, I am relieved that they are taking the time to make sure this movie is done right, whatever it may be.

What are your thoughts on this change?  Would you prefer this movie to be just with Batman or Superman (and now Wonder Woman) or would you like appearances of other DC heroes?  Let us know in the comments.

By Charles On 16 Oct, 2013 At 11:04 PM | Categorized As Conventions, Editorials, Featured, Reviews, Uncategorized | With 0 Comments

No GravatarPreface: I did not attend NYCC as a member of the press. I did not attend as a speaker, professional, general audience member, marvin, or artist. This editorial review is simply a reflection of my experiences over the weekend, and should be taken as such.

Oh what a difference three years makes.

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The Dork Knight Returns!

Yep, it has indeed been three years since I last attended New York Comic Con. Back then, there was still an Anime Festival attached to the annual spectacle that dominates a chunk of Western midtown, and while that population of otaku and cosplayers was segregated from the mass that was NYCC, it was still something. Then 2012 rolled around, the Anime Festival was shelved, and Comic Con transformed itself into a fully immersive (and massive) pop culture extravaganza. Particular emphasis need be laid on the “pop culture” part of this equation, because in the scant years since its inception, NYCC has gone from a comic convention into something closer resembling its San Diego cousin- television culture, video gaming, literature, comics, collectibles and anime, all wrapped into one gigantic package that is literally impossible to navigate, nor experience over the course of a single weekend. Believe me, I’ve tried.

To put things into perspective, the largest event I regularly attend- Baltimore’s Otakon- pulls in around 34,000 people, and packs the halls of the BCC to almost the choke point. The BCC is a rather large space, separated into two buildings and attached hotels, and still manages to hold the growing anime convention each year. New York Comic Con pulls in around 4-5 times as many attendees, into a space not much larger than the BCC, and completely devoid of mass transit access and affordable hotels. Try for a moment, then, to picture the size and scale of such an event, of the masses of people moving along painfully slowly, stopped 20131012_151752up by cosplay photographs and snaking lines on the floor itself, and you get a general idea of what a typical weekend experience is for an NYCC attendee. And, unlike Otakon, those throngs of people are there for the entire weekend- Sunday is just as packed as Thursday, Friday or Saturday, with the line for badge pickup extended out the door.

That’s been one of the main reasons I’ve skipped NYCC for so long. Unlike the other conventions I attend, there is little actual community at the con- most of the weekend is akin to a fight for proverbial survival against the masses. Panels? Not a chance, as I’m not willing to sit in a line for 45 minutes only to be turned away. Autographs? Also slim, since shelling out upwards of $70 for a signed photo offends my “Queens Sensibilities” (not to mention digs into my food budget). What my weekend ultimately boils down to is a few scattered cosplay shots, some chatting with vendors and artists, and catching up with old friends I only see at Comic Con. It’s not that I’m not motivated to do more, it’s just time, space, willpower, and logistics make doing anything beyond “going with the flow” into an impossibility when you have X hours to attempt Y activities. It takes a special sort of masochism to navigate those halls midday, and for this man, the rewards aren’t worth the undertaking.

20131012_192410Now as critical as this sounds, don’t take it to mean that prospective attendees should balk at going. NYCC is a behemoth, one of the few cons that actually thrive from this mass of stimuli and competing events. The size of the con is its greatest asset, since it forces attendees to prioritize, focus on what is truly important to them, and allows plenty of “wiggle room” for those without a clue of what to do. There is something for everyone at NYCC, provided that everyone chooses to dig through a tome of a program guide in search of the exact panels and screenings that everyone wants to see. It teaches humility, as rooms fill and chances at freebies dry up. And it offers the neophyte congoer a glimpse into the wide world of fandom, which can far exceed anyone’s estimates. Comic Con manages through sheer size the same type of fandom convergence that other cons only hint it, placing it on display and offering options for the individual to select from. Every fan should go at least once, just to share in the experience, and question their own place within the fandom community.

As a fandom experience, though, its far from perfect. Every year has its issues, and this year is no exception. Most glaring of these “flaws” was the placement of the Artist Alley: the last time I attended NYCC, the Alley was opposite the show floor, with wide aisles and a good selection of artists. One simply needed to cross past the massive pavilions for comic publishers and media companies to find those die-hard illustrators showcasing wares. This year, the Alley was relocated to Javits North, a still-growing addition to the convention center that more resembles an airplane hangar than a showroom. In its former place was yet another space for shops, small presses, the gigantic Intel Booth, and some artists. Navigating that space was just as brutal as the rest of the floor, but since it was still separated by the media expositions, it could take twice as long to get from one end of the floor to the other. The Alley itself was perfectly solid- professional illustrators and their amateur colleagues shared table space, signed books and prints, and took commissions from enthusiastic attendees. But its location- segregated from the rest of the show- reminded me a bit too much of the 2010 “Anime Ghetto,” where artists and craftspeople of the otaku persuasion were kept away from the “serious artists” (as one of them put it) up stairs. One can only wonder if those same “serious artists” had similar feelings this year…though not likely, given the large foot traffic that was a constant presence in Javits North (took me a full 25 minutes to get there on Saturday Afternoon).

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Image taken Sunday…afternoon.

Autographs were also in their own special section, removed from the show floor, though that was undoubtedly for logistical purposes, as the higher profile guests had their own snakes, which would have wreaked havoc upstairs on the show floor, which already had its own line issues when vendors decided to bring in talent to sign at their tables. (One point of dismay on my part- I never once saw a line for professional wrestling legends Sergeant Slaughter or Million Dollar Man Ted Dibiase. Has this country forgotten those legends of yesteryear?)

As with previous NYCCs, the roving vendors had their own section, which was more clustered around the exhibits, which took up a good deal of floor space right as one entered. And those exhibitors pulled out all the stops to grab attention: Bandai had a veritable museum of new/soon to be released products, from Saiyan scanners to a Comic Con exclusive model from the anime series Valvrave. South Park built a replica of Main Street, complete with crashed alien saucer. Daisuki.net had a weekend long viewing party that easily outdrew Funimation, and the Intel booth…well, let’s just say it was one of the few places with open space, owing to its sheer mass and revolving programming. Had I not been a Comic Con veteran, I likely would have gone into overload just staring at the booths and flashing lights.

20131013_114935I didn’t really get to do much over the weekend. Anime panels were thin, and filled up quickly, so I elected to avoid them. As I also have become immune to vendor rooms, I also spent very little money (just at GEN Manga and IFC, on Sunday, when the prices dropped). And since I did not have a press pass for the event, I volunteered my services to a friend’s booth for Saturday and Sunday. I’ve worked as a vendor more than a few times (it’s how I got into NYAF 09), and I’ve found that sitting in that one space is actually one of the better ways to experience the con- you have water, food, a place to sit, and generally get to see the same people as a roving reporter would, just without the claustrophobia. You also get a keen sense of the community at large- what are they spending on, what are they enthusiastic about, who are they cosplaying, et al. This weekend, the “big winners” were Berserk (everyone wanted Gattsu figures), Attack on Titan, soft earmuffs, and Ocarinas, only because I was sitting across from a vendor selling them, and listening to the same 10 songs ALL WEEKEND. And “con babies”- I saw a lot of new parents with costumed children in tow, which made me feel as fuzzy as the scarves I was selling them.

Like I started this review-torial with, I haven’t been to NYCC in three years, so seeing the growth and expansion of this convention into a dominating pop culture event was a point of pride and humility. That said, I also left feeling worn out, exhausted, and a little empty. Some of that was definitely due to working all weekend, but some of that was also the “transient” nature of the con itself- I’ve come to expect a certain amount of community and interaction at conventions I attend. I didn’t find it at NYCC. And that definitely soured some of my experience. But that is coming from a longtime convention veteran, who has already been to 14 other cons this year. For the first-timer, or the inexperienced newb, NYCC likely has a much different feel. Like I said, everyone needs to go at least once to discover where that feeling leads them.

[Gallery] Comic Con After Dark: Images from Sunday night…because not everyone gets to see the con being broken down.

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