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By Jessica Brister On 21 Jul, 2016 At 08:34 PM | Categorized As Featured, Reviews | With 0 Comments

No GravatarSharing your favorite geek fandoms as a parent is one of the many awesome things about having little ones. As my daughter has gotten older, I have started to slowly introduce her to some of my favorite geeky things. Now that Disney owns the Star Wars franchise and with the release of The Force Awakens, there are a lot more novelty items out for fans to enjoy. My daughter received a boxed set of Star Wars Little Golden books for her birthday that follow the first six movies. If you are not familiar, Little Golden books are children’s books with a gold-colored binding. You may have read them before as a child. After reading through The Phantom Menace and Attack of the Clones, my daughter and I continued through to Revenge of the Sith.

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Star Wars: Revenge of the Sith (Little Golden Book edition) was written by Geof Smith and illustrated by Patrick Spaziante. It was published in 2015 by Golden Books. I got this particular book in a packaged deal with five other Star Wars episodes as children’s books, but for the purpose of this review, I will only be discussing Revenge of the Sith.

The book focuses on the main points of the movie. Anakin and Padame are secretly married, and she is pregnant. War is continuing to rage against the Republic and the Separatist army. There are a lot of battles and fighting, and then the inevitable descent of Anakin into the dark side. I’m assuming that if you are interested in this book, you probably already know the rest, so I’ll spare you the details.

Revenge of the Sith was definitely the best of the prequels. However, it did not translate over very well into a children’s book. Even though the author did the best that he could with making the plot a little more kid-friendly, reading it to my daughter was kind of depressing. I thought that the pacing was right for a children’s story, but the story itself just did not fit well. This is not a knock at the author. I’m not sure what else he could have possibly done.

The book is aimed at older children and has no rhyming or rhythm to it. It is more story-oriented instead of focusing on teaching a concept. The book only comes with regular soft pages with a hard cover, so you may want to watch this with very young children if you decide to purchase it. Since it is not a board book, your very little one might tear it up.

The illustrations were well-done and at least tried to make the book a little more child-friendly. It was a tough story to draw, based on everything that happened. There are illustrations on every page with text, and the pictures did a good job of furthering the narration when needed.

Overall, I really liked this book as a novelty children’s book. However, I would caution any parent with the content of the story. It’s a little down. Actually, it’s kind of depressing. You may want to skip this one until your kids are a bit older, but that is one hundred percent your call as a geek parent.

By Jessica Brister On 16 May, 2016 At 07:20 PM | Categorized As Reviews | With 0 Comments

No GravatarOne of the fun things to do as a geek parent is share your love of various fandoms with your children. I am definitely guilty of this. I really adore sharing geeky stuff with my daughter. Now that Disney has bought the Star Wars franchise and with the release of The Force Awakens, there are tons of new novelty items out for fans to purchase. My daughter received a boxed set of Star Wars Little Golden books that follow the first six movies. If you don’t know, Little Golden books are children’s books with a gold-colored binding. Many of you may have read them as kids or are currently reading them to your kids. After reading through The Phantom Menace with my daughter, we moved on to Attack of the Clones. It was just as cute and entertaining, and my daughter particularly loved this one for whatever reason.

Meanwhile, Obi-Wan goes to Kamino to discover that the Republic has a new army of clones. I’m assuming that if you are interested in this book, you probably already know the rest, so I’ll spare you the details.

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Star Wars: Attack of the Clones (Little Golden Book edition) was written by Christopher Nicholas and illustrated by Ethen Beavers. It was published in 2015 by Golden Books. This particular book was actually a packaged deal with five other Star Wars episodes as children’s books, but for the purpose of this review, I will only be discussing Attack of the Clones.

The book highlights the main points of the movie. Padme is in danger from assassins, so Anakin is recruited to watch her and keep her safe. Romance ensues.  Though Attack of the Clones was slightly better in plot than The Phantom Menace, there were still big long sections of dull stuff that could have just been cut out. As a children’s book, though, the story gets right to the point, glimpsing past some of the cringe-worthy romance between Padame and Anakin as well as some of the boring politics. In some ways, it was more fun to read this story as a children’s story than as an actual movie.

The book is aimed at older children as it has no rhyming and does not focus on teaching. It’s more story-oriented than anything else. The book only comes with regular pages and a hard cover, so parents with very young children might want to wait. I know my little one could only do board books very awhile because she would tear at the pages.

The illustrations were great and very child-friendly. They gelled together well with the style of writing and were very appropriate for a younger audience. There are illustrations on every page with text, and the pictures really did do a great job of furthering the narration when needed.

Overall, I would rate the book highly since it did a great job as a novelty children’s book: tells a fun tale that is full of action and adventure. Attack of the Clones is not one of my favorite Star Wars movies, but it does a great job as being a children’s book. I would recommend this book for any geek parent who would like to share Star Wars with their kids.

By Jessica Brister On 14 May, 2016 At 11:43 PM | Categorized As Featured, Reviews | With 0 Comments

No GravatarMany geek parents often like to share their various fandoms with their children. I am no exception. I love doing geeky stuff with my daughter. With Disney’s purchase of the Star Wars franchise and the release of The Force Awakens, there have been a lot more novelty items available. One of the cuter items that I have seen is Little Golden Book editions of all of the Star Wars movies. If you don’t know, Little Golden books are children’s books with a gold-colored binding. Many of you may have read them when you were kids. Well, I read the Phantom Menace version with my daughter and thought that it was a cute way to share Star Wars with her.

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Star Wars: The Phantom Menace (Little Golden Book edition) was written by Courtney Carbone and illustrated by Heather Martinez. It was published in 2015 by Golden Books. The book that I received was actually a packaged deal with five other Star Wars episodes as children’s books, but for the purpose of this review, I will only be discussing The Phantom Menace.

The book obviously follows the main highlights of the movie. As much as I really disliked it as a movie, it’s kind of cute as a children’s book. Qui-Gon Jinn and Obi-Wan Kenobi try to help out with the blockade of the planet Naboo by the Trade Federation. They end up escaping with Padame and meeting a young force-talented boy. The rest is history. It’s kind of funny because of how convaluted the politics were with the movie, but in a children’s book, it sticks with the main plot and makes it sort of enjoyable. Don’t get me wrong, I still think that The Phantom Menace is an abomination. However, it’s a little more bearable when you are reading it to a child.

It is really for older children, so there is no rhyme scheme to it. The book is not for very young children who like to tear at pages, since it is not a board book and is more focused on telling a story than teaching.

The illustrations were quite cute and very child-friendly. Even characters who could be considered “scary” for a young child like Darth Maul or Darth Sidious were a little more friendlier-looking for the younger audience. There are illustrations on every page with text as well as a few pages that are full illustrations. The pictures did a great job of furthering the narration when needed.

Overall, I would rate the book highly since it does its job as a novelty children’s book: tells a tale full of action and adventure, where good wins over evil. Obviously, it’s still The Phantom Menace, so I was cringing at bit at some of the parts. However, I felt that it was well suited for kids and was actually quite cute.

By Jessica Brister On 14 May, 2016 At 10:33 PM | Categorized As Featured, Reviews | With 0 Comments

No GravatarI will have to admit that as a geek parent, I often purchase items for my daughter that are for nostalgic purposes or are just plain geeky gimmicks. When I saw the children’s book Goodnight Darth Vader, I knew that I just had to have it because…why not? (I ended up putting it on her wish list, and my sister got it for my daughter as a birthday present.) I think it’s cute that there are so many geek novelty items out there that I can share with my daughter. This particular Star Wars-themed children’s books is particularly adorable in all of the right ways. It brings back a lot of nostalgia for adults, and is fairly cute for the kids.

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Goodnight Darth Vader is a children’s book written and illustrated by Jeffrey Brown. It was published in 2014 by Chronicle Books. Brown has written previous Star Wars-themed children’s books such as Darth Vader an Son (2012) and Vader’s Littler Princess (2013). Goodnight Darth Vader continues the tradition of combining the rhythm and repetition of children’s books with cute pictures and Star Wars content. It parodies the classic children’s book, Goodnight Moon.

The premise of the book is that Darth Vader needs to get his children, Luke and Leia to bed, as if they were a somewhat normal family. The rest of the book goes through saying “goodnight” to all of the familiar Star Wars characters from the original trilogy to the prequels. It’s definitely a nostalgia trip for the adult reading the book, though I’m not quite sure if the young child will appreciate it as much.

The “good nights” go (mostly) in chronological order from The Phantom Menace to Return of the Jedi. Every two pages rhyme, so when you open the book, each set of pages go together. Some of the rhyming doesn’t flow as nicely as other sets, but for the most part, it’s an enjoyable book to read aloud to a child.

The artwork is definitely the best part of the book. It fits the tone and feel of the book quite well. Each page has a fairly full color comic-like drawing of a particular Star Wars scene. Sure, it’s cutesy, but it is a children’s book after all.

Though the book is very enjoyable, I wish that there was the option of getting it as a board book so that it is a little more toddler-proof. I could only find it as either an e-book or as a hard cover with soft pages. Overall, though, I think this is a great buy for Star Wars fans who would like to share their fandom with the younger generation.  Yes, it’s a bit of a gimmick, but I don’t think most adults who are considering purchasing this book will mind.