You Are Browsing ' Otaku ' Tag

By Sofie Sohan On 28 Feb, 2014 At 05:13 AM | Categorized As Conventions, Editorials, Reviews, ROG News | With 0 Comments
17523_598834396816496_1041058712_n

No Gravatar

The winter this year in New York has been particularly harsh on everyone, both mentally and physically. The Vikings even thought Ragnarok, the Viking Apocalypse was scheduled for this weekend.

{cue Led Zeppelin – Immigrant song here}

So it was no surprise to me, that when I looked at my significant other last week during dinner and casually asked “So… what do you want to do this weekend?” that they sighed, returning with nothing but a non-committal shrug. Then, through a series of strange events, we found ourselves with our car packed to the hilt (it’s normal to need eight tiaras for a weekend…right?), on the road to New Jersey for Jeff Mach’s Wicked Faire, which turned out to be the perfect cure for the winter blues.

I SPIT FIRE AT YOU, WINTER

What exactly IS Wicked Faire? The more accurate question is what ISN’T Wicked Faire? It is part convention, part renaissance festival, part music festival, but 100% stress-free fun, as I quickly found out. The following is taken from the About section of the Wicked Faire website, and I would absolutely agree that this is an accurate assessment:

“The Wicked Winter Renaissance Faire is a miniature explosion of entertainment and activity, wrapped up in a fresh-baked Renaissance Faire exterior, filled to the brim with big tasty chunks of well-seasoned festival, spiced with a bit of convention, then dipped in a sauce of non-convention, and served at a terribly low price during one fantastic frenetic weekend every year. There are so many madly diverse fun things going on at any one time that, in general, if you come looking to find a good time, you are damn likely to find one.”

(Read more here: Wicked Faire: About )

Wicked Faire is an extravagant, fascinating, enthralling, all-you-can-experience buffet of entertainment, shows, interactions and fun. It is devoted to creating a weekend of acceptance, and creating a space where any non-normative person can express themselves; be it through geek, steampunk, kink, sexuality, renaissance, cosplay, burlesque et cetera. You can be as dressed up or as dressed down as you like – I wore cocktail dresses all weekend while a friend I was with wore jeans and a geeky T-shirt and we both still garnered an equal amount of positive attention. There were a variety of things to do, people to see and musicians to watch. There was a secondary festival going on at the same time, Voltaire’s Necrocomiccon, but unfortunately, I didn’t have any time to check that event out (though I really wanted to!)

We had gotten to New Jersey on Friday at about 10 PM, after a few GPS mishaps and a quick Taco Bell break. We checked in at the Doubletree Somerset, and received room keys, which apparently also came with free chocolate chip cookies. Free cookies are always a great start to a convention.

FREE COOKIES

After a quick costume change and some light social interaction, we went party hopping within the hotel, which was fun in and of itself. I woke up at 11 AM on Saturday and decided to check out the dealers rooms. The vendors themselves were incredibly varied, from leather armour to teas, steampunk hats, knives, gourmet dipping sauces, and hair flowers. I spent a good three hours inside the rooms (that’s a long time when you’re hungover), talking to all of the vendors. We all laughed about my state of hangover, and one of them even gave me aspirin. All of the goods being sold were of high quality with an emphasis on homemade, and the fact that the vendors actually took the time to talk to me in depth about their products despite only buying a few small things, shows that they care about their consumer base.

I have provided links to a few of the vendors I personally talked to over the weekend with a glimpse of some of my favorite products of theirs:

- Gorgeous handcrafted wire elf and dragon ears jewellery with precious stones: Belethil, Jewelry by Alanya Divine

I love this so much. What’s great about these is you can wear them to LARPs, or as standalone jewellery.

- Handcrafted steampunk and leather hats, goggles and other accessories: The Blonde Swan

I love red, I love lace, and I love hats… so naturally I love this.

- Hand blended artisan teas that are inspired by music, works of literature and fantasy art. Gluten free and vegan friendly! Dryad Tea:

TEA DELICIOUS TEA

- Infused oils, dips, kitchen wares and cookbooks with a pagan touch: Cucina Aurora 

I cannot stress how delicious this infused oil was enough.

- Handcrafted hair flowers, sticks and fascinators: Pyraara

I love the combo of hair flower + feather.

Saturday afternoon I caught a cello performance by The Wandering Cellist. I had played cello all throughout secondary school, and the technical skill displayed was astounding. It should also be noted that Mike covered “Nothing Else Matters” by Metallica on cello. I REALLY wish I had caught it on video, but I felt my cell phone recording wouldn’t do it justice. You can find more cello music here: The Wandering Cellist 

Saturday evening we caught Busts & Trunks Burlesque show. They are a division of the Ocelot on a Leash Theater Company, and are from Philadelphia. The Busts and Trunks division caters specifically to geek culture, and the show they had put on Saturday night was entirely Doctor Who themed. They were incredibly awesome and varied in their performances, and my favorite performance was an Amy & Rory burlesque number to Queen’s “Crazy Little Thing Called Love,” closely followed by a second favorite of a Captain Jack Harkness boylesque number.

Busts & Trucks Burlesque

Our Sunday was a bit more relaxed. Though we wanted to do more, we only went to a couple of other things, an awesome pastie-making workshop by the girls of Busts & Trunks, and another burlesque show, this time by The White Elephant Burlesque Society, who hail from New Jersey. I’m pretty sure I lost my voice from cheering so hard between the two shows. This show was a bit less nerd oriented, but still just as entertaining, with a variety in content; there was ballet, traditional Hawaiian dancing, chair and fan dancing were all used in their acts. One member of their troupe, Holly Ween, ate cookies like Cookie Monster while dancing to Lady Gaga. It was incredible.

Delicious, delicious cookies…

The weekend setlist for WEBS can be found here

All in all, I would have to say as a first time attendee, that Wicked Faire was a LOT of fun for everyone, regardless of what subculture you’re into, and I would definitely go back! I’ve also made tentative plans to attend Steampunk’s World Faire, which runs Friday, May 16th – Sunday, May 18th, 2014 in Piscataway, NJ and is also run by Jeff Mach events. You, dear reader, should come along too.

Until next time, this is Sofie Sohan signing out! 

By HMK On 25 Feb, 2014 At 11:57 PM | Categorized As Featured, Nintendo 3DS, Nintendo DS, Nintendo Wii/Wii U, Old School Otaku, ROG News, Videos | With 0 Comments
LOZ retrospective ROG 2

No Gravatar

The Hero, The Princess, and The Lord of Evil.
These three entities have created and brought forth fantasies and stories for centuries. In the dawn of video gaming, Nintendo took these three elements and weaved together a tale that would go on and become a legend. That legend is
The Legend of Zelda!

This retrospective was done to celebrate our “Ultimate Legend of Zelda Fan Contest” and the celebration of the Japanese release of the original game. We hope you enjoy the video and feel free to comment below.

Narrated by Giovanni “HMK” Santos
Produced by Giovanni “HMK” Santos, Andre Tipton
Written and Edited by Giovanni “HMK” Santos
Additional Editing provide by Tyler “VoltEditzz” W.
Directed by Giovanni “HMK” Santos, Daniel “DNA8255″ Santos

The Legend of Zelda is created and owned by Nintendo.

Don’t forget to keep it here at Real Otaku Gamer and subscribe to HMK for more on The Legend of Zelda

https://www.youtube.com/hmk9capn

By Isabel On 24 Feb, 2014 At 06:52 PM | Categorized As Animation, Comics/Manga, Reviews, ROG Fashion, ROG News | With 0 Comments
Looks like our old banner!

No Gravatar

I stumbled upon a little documentary while I roamed around Youtube and while it’s far from perfect I think it gives a balanced overview of otakus. It’s so well made in fact I think it’s the one documentary to show any questioning parents so they have a good understanding of our little subculture.

The piece True Otaku: The Documentary is an amateur documentary that explains the otaku fandom by going straight to the source, questioning regular fans and industry professionals in Otakon and Anime USA about many different topics related to the subject.

Looks like our old banner!

Looks like our old banner!

It explains the anime boom that occurred in the US and how it led to the surge in anime fans that created such large conventions, lolita fashion, fan groups, and cosplay. Granted, they focused too much on cosplay and not enough on anime and manga, nor popular otaku video games such as visual novels and the unbelievably popular shooter Touhou nor fighting games like Persona 4, and not even on collectors of anime merchandise, but it’s a good introductory film to any questioning individual and I believe if  everyone saw it they’d have more respect for the otaku community.

You can see the film for free on Youtube where it’s split into 3 parts: You can watch the first part here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mdv0n5DUb4E and see the rest at leisure. Happy watching!

By Isabel On 10 Jan, 2014 At 06:01 PM | Categorized As Featured, Mobile Gaming, Otaku Music, Portable/Mobile Gaming, Reviews, Reviews | With 0 Comments
Listening to Senbonzakura with Miku

No Gravatar

Hardcore Hatsune Miku fanboys and fangirls feel loneliness no more because the great and benevolent makers of… well essentially a waifu app with Miku, released a translation of their popular game unto the English market. But before spending your hard earned $3.99 on this app you must be asking yourselves is it any good?

Tutorial begining screen

Essentially the app claims it will allow you to “enjoy music more with Miku” and I say they’ve delivered pretty well on that promise. This is not a gaming app and has limited interactivity, so I only recommend this to hardcore Vocaloid fans. I shall explain it in greater detail after the pretty pictures.

End of tutorial screen

Forever and ever and ever…..

Listening to Senbonzakura with Miku

Just listening to Senbonzakura while Miku jams along makes this app worth every penny.

Essentially this is another type of music player. You pick what songs you want to listen to and when you press play you can get to listen to your favorite songs with Miku. Now let’s make it clear she doesn’t dance or sing along, she moves to the rhythm with some head bopping and other stuff to break the routine. The element that makes this app more than just a buddy to listen to music with is the interaction element.

You interact with Miku by gaining points you get from listening to music with her. When you spend a point you can ask her a question, get asked a question, and if you’re lucky get a high five. What’s truly a shame is some of the questions are repeated over and over again to the point you answer or ask other stuff out of boredom, she’s lucky all her reactions are cute.

Interesting answers

IMG_0278

The Engrish isn’t strong with this translation, but it is present. The game is also riddled with glitches I randomly happen to stumble upon and definitely needs some fixing here and there. My main pet peeve is the bar with the time and battery life is present on top unlike other apps, and the game has a clock so it isn’t like I need it.

Item to collect: smartphone

At least she’s rich enough to get me nice things ^_^

Glitch

The best part of this game though is the items she gives you when you fill the interaction bubble. It’s always interesting to see what the latest item she gave me is and I’m looking forward to getting every single one of them.

It’s a nice simple app to keep you company. Play too long with it and you will be bored, so just use it to fill in those calm moments when you listen to music to add flavor to your daily routine. If you need some more fanservice, there are 3 additional outfit and head sets, although I don’t think they’re worth their cost ($3.99 same as the game). You can get the game on iTunes now!

By Isabel On 11 Nov, 2013 At 08:29 PM | Categorized As Comics/Manga, Reviews, ROG News | With 0 Comments
cromartiecrew

No Gravatar

The manga section, whether it’s at the book store, comic shop, library, or from a convention vendor, it could be described as big and confusing. You’ve got the big name manga series that all have equally huge anime behind them proudly displayed for the mass consumers (despite that I love the otaku community for its uniqueness I can’t deny its classification as a consumer base, and a  very profitable one at that). From that point on you see an avalanche of less popular manga featuring moe girls, generic romance mangas, and typical action infused junk that seem to be just  flashing sword trails clashing against one another. Looking upon this black and white confusion that screams for attention with every cover I’ve wondered what happened to drawing comics just for the sake of drawing comics. My love for the standard manga is often at odds with my desire for comics with their own distinct  style. It seems that Japan’s comic scene as a whole is artistically becoming stale to the point you can’t tell the difference between one mangaka and the next.

With that in mind I’ll talk today about a manga that just doesn’t give a damn about looking pretty or cool and tosses aside the “manga” mold to stay true as a great manga. I’m talking about none other than the extremely underrated and painfully obscure Cromartie High School series. Full name Forging Valiently Ahead!! Cromartie High School.

cromartiecrew

I need to start with, holly damn, I LOVE this manga.

The story is about an intelligent and capable student (Takashi Kamiyama) who enrolled at Cromartie High School to stay with his only friend back in middle school, only to find himself alone because his friend was too stupid to pass the entrance exam an ape did. Hence he finds himself in this school full of “badasses” and accidentally becomes their leader. As the manga ensues, the story seems to become less and less about Takashi and more about the other members of the strange student body which include a robot called Mechazawa, some old guy that looks like Freddy Mercury, a gorilla, a badass who suffers from car sickness, and a rich guy with a purpose.

When you’re reading a manga from someone who doesn’t even know why he became a mangaka in the first place you never know what to expect. Cromartie High School is 100% comedy, and a perfect fit for anyone beginning to read manga without knowing about some in-jokes only experienced readers can get. Cromartie High School had an anime and live action movie made about it, but I absolutely urge everyone to read the manga first. The anime stopped at a certain point while the manga kept going, and I believe reading it first enriches the viewing experience. Below is a clip I believe perfectly captures the atmosphere of the series and definitely makes people want to see more.

“He’s a nice guy on the Internet.”

By Isabel On 8 Nov, 2013 At 09:23 PM | Categorized As Animation, Featured, International News, News, ROG News, ROG Tech, Uncategorized | With 0 Comments
886439_487827581332987_125974096_o

No Gravatar

Internet Explorer has experienced a decline in use and appreciation as more and more people started to use faster and more powerful browsers like Chrome and Mozilla Firefox. Internet Explorer, with its 10th version up and running, is confident in its ability to provide a “fluid” way to surf the Internet and recover some of its former users and perhaps some more. To capture anime fans who tend to use the web a lot Windows has adopted an antropomorphic moe character created by independent art and doujin creator Collateral Damage Studios called Inori Aizawa. CDS not only created a design for her, but a backstory. Inori used to be an awkward nerdy gal who messed up a lot and despite keeping some of that former awkwardness (so moe) is now a pretty and confident girl. She made a grand opening at this year’s Anime Festival Asia with this video.

To complete the package Internet Explorer has created an Inori Aizawa version of its browser. Will this marketing strategy work in their favor? Only time will tell, but so far it seems she’s doing well with over 30K likes on her official Facebook page. I like her design a lot, and find her to be a huge improvement over IE’s old mascot for Internet Explorer 8.

886439_487827581332987_125974096_o

With a design this cool let’s hope she gets a proper figure.

By SarahTheRebel On 20 Sep, 2013 At 03:16 AM | Categorized As Comics/Manga, Reviews | With 0 Comments
akuma_origins_cover

No Gravatar

First appeared on www.NerdyButFlirty.com

Let’s just get this out of the way: I’ve had a strange crush on Akuma from the moment I laid eyes on him, at the tender age of sixteen. So I will do my best to give you a reasonable review instead of fan-girling all over the place.

akuma_origins_cover

Street Fighter Origins: Akuma is Udon’s first ever book-length graphic novel, which tells the origin story of the Street Fighter character Akuma. At 128 pages, the hardcover retails for $34.95, while the digital copy is $19.99.

I loved the story, and I have to say I was presently surprised with the writing. It’s almost prose at times, and, although most people know the basic outline of Akuma’s story, the graphic novel brings its own flavor to what we know and fills out the lore. The foreshadowing is excellent, and I loved the cyclical nature of the story.

streetfighteroriginsakuma_preview2

Street Fighter Origins: Akuma is a gorgeous book. The art is lush, and I think they picked the perfect medium to tell Akuma’s story. The color palette is in harmony with the Street Fighter series, and I enjoyed watching Akuma’s gradual change into the badass monster.

Along with the story itself, there is a bit of art and explanation in the back, though not as much special content as I’ve normally seen in compilations.

Check out a preview of the first chapter!

Plot

“He is the world’s most feared martial artist, mentioned only in whispers. Few have dared to challenge him, and even fewer have survived to speak of the nightmare. He is Akuma – Master of the Fist, wielder of the Dark Hado. But he was not always trapped on the path of chaos. Street Fighter Origins: Akuma reveals the secrets of this dark figure’s past for the first time, and shows how a frustrated young man grew into a mad demon.”

streetfighteroriginsakuma_preview1

The Deets

Story
Chris Sarracini

Art
Joe Ng

Inks:
Robert Armstrong
Kevin Raganit

Lettering:
Marshall Dillon

Front Cover Art:
Joe Ng (pencils) and Gonzalo Ordonez Arias (colors)

Back Cover Art:
Joe Ng (pencils) and Espen Grundetjern (colors)

Line Art:
Joe Ng

Colors:
Espen Grundetjern

Click here to buy!

By Charles On 29 Aug, 2013 At 05:38 PM | Categorized As Animation, Conventions, Editorials, Featured | With 0 Comments
otakon20_0

No Gravatar

Going out on a limb here, but if you had mentioned to that small collective of dedicated fans in State College, PA, who gathered on a nondescript weekend in 1994, that their meet-up of anime fans would one day go on to be the second largest anime convention event in the United States, they probably would have looked at you funny, laughed and added “maybe in our dreams,” before running off to watch some tapes or “talk shop.”

And yet, 20 conventions later, that is the truth of Otakon- the largest anime convention on the East coast, and gathering ground for all sorts of otaku, geeks, nerds, Japanophiles, hangers-on, confused parents, and anyone who appreciates either anime, fandom, or both.

Now I’ve been knew to this “game.” My first Otakon was in 2009, and it held a sort of mystery to me. I had heard of it time and again from friends online, but had no idea where it was, and little interest to attend. When I finally did cross through those doors and into the massive space that is the Baltimore Convention Center, I was immediately overwhelmed by what I had stepped into. It took me three years to finally “get it right.” And then two more thrown in “for good measure,” because as much as crowds might unnerve me at times, the prospect of friends and fellowship entices me more.

Blame it on my “history” of attending smaller conventions, but that was really where my fandom gestated. Cons like Otakon differ from smaller fare, and the dynamics of the smaller cons are less about big-name guests and announcements, and more about getting to know your fellow fans. I spent the majority of my  congoing life at those events (and I frequently cite Hampton, VA’s Nekocon as the standard by which I formed my congoer identity), and was generally accustomed to the “simpler things”- meet friends, hang in hallway, grab some food, repeat until Monday. Otakon is not that convention, and hasn’t been for over 15 years. While those types of interactions are definitely a part of the Otakon experience, more of it can best be summed up as “brave crowd-stand in line-see event- repeat until Monday.”

Read reviews for Otakon 20, and you will read a lot about lines. Lines were the order of this convention (so much that one writer quipped that “lines are part of the real Otakon experience.” True, if that’s the experience you seek).  A stark departure from the smaller events where lines seem to only exist outside 18+ content, or in front of autograph tables as anxious attendees wait for a chance to meet their idols. Lines for autographs are definitely long at Otakon. Lines for concert tickets equally so. Lines for the Dealer’s Room, lines for the panel rooms…I know plenty of bloggers and attendees who spent upwards of 7 hours standing in line.

But not me. Like Eric Cartman, I hate lines. And I usually find that what waits at the end isn’t worth the loss of time “better” spent wandering, chatting, or resting my aching body. My Otakon 20 wasn’t about getting to meet Shinichiro Watanabe (though I did, briefly). It wasn’t about snagging that coveted Sunday Concert Pass for Yoko Kanno (though I did, indirectly). It wasn’t even about attending the premieres for Oriemo 2 and Wolf Children (the former I had no interest in, the latter I had seen already).

For me, Otakon 20 was much like Otakons 18 and 19- I was there to experience the weekend as a whole, not the individual parts. I wanted to see the crowds, talk to the fans, tag up my StreetPass, and maybe decompress in the Harbor when the stimulus became too much. I wanted my “stage” to present content, then vanish for hours with friends while we people-watched and drank copious amounts of coffee. That has been my Otakon experience ever since 2011, and for me, it works.

On that level, Otakon 20 was a rousing success. Maybe not as over-the-top awesome as last year’s event, but still a successful weekend all around. They’ve been getter better, as well, since my first “road show” in 2009- part of that revolves around better programming and guest options, part around me knowing what the hell I’m doing- but as each convention passes by, I “get” it more and more.

Since I elected to eschew the lines and made it to exactly one panel that wasn’t one of mine, I can’t rightly call this exposition a review. One of the downsides to the way I experience Otakon is that I see very little of the “con,” but a whole lot of the convention space and community. On that front, I have little comments that I haven’t said before- Otakon is a frenetic mass of controlled chaos, kept in check my beleaguered volunteers who sometimes find themselves in over their heads, not unlike the attendees themselves.

Were their line management problems? Definitely. I witnessed line cuts a few times, and lines set up in the wrong places, but mostly as I passed them by on one of my “walks.” Were their rude staffers? I’d find it hard to believe there weren’t any, given the size and stress of the weekend, though I never bumped into any. Were there memes? Yes, moreso than the last two years, but nowhere near as annoying as 2009. (And one of them- a crowd of people constantly singing “I’ll Make A Man Out Of You” from the Mulan soundtrack- were less annoying than quirky. At least they were being “productive” with their hall karaoke.)

Again, nothing I haven’t seen before, and nothing unexpected given the size and scope of Otakon itself. (Although the incident with the bubble bath in the fountain was something entirely new.)

The community this year was surprising- more and more anime-centric cosplay (especially from breakout hits Free! and Attack on Titan), less visible non-anime stalwarts (like Homestuck, MLP and Doctor Who), and a healthy amount of discussion centered around the 2013 anime crop, and how “awesome it is.” One of my early Friday panels- We Con, Therefore We Are, a critical look at convention culture and otakudom, co-hosted by the indomitable Daryl Surat of Anime World Order, and Doug Wilder of AnimeconsTV- exceeded my meager expectations by leaps and bounds: I hoped for 40-50 people, I got almost 1000, and none of them were there to “troll”, only discuss and debate. Which they did, all weekend, as people kept stopping me to comment on how thought-provoking and insightful the panel was. I had intended to present my observations and research from the past five years of activity in the community, and was surprised at how many other long-term members of the same community were coming to the same conclusions, and how their general opinion of the situation wasn’t too different from my own.

Community. Yes, it always comes back to community. Because, when it comes down to it, community is why Otakon has grown by such leaps and bounds, and community is why the convention culture is so strong, fragmented as it might appear. Time and again, I will insist that community is what is driving the attendees to devote such time to their “hobby,” and through the community are their devotions validated. You see it in the smaller, more intimate cons, that thrive off their core of attendees who pop up every year to support their local fandom. You see it in the massive throngs at Anime Boston and Katsucon, who pack the halls of large convention spaces with cosplay and conversation. You see it at Otakon, where these other groups converge for a single showing of support and “insanity,” for who else would choose to brave those crowded halls, if not the “crazy ones?”

On Saturday night, I (alongside friends Kit and Haru) was sitting in Harbor East, having dinner with voice actor and theologian Crispin Freeman. At this “oasis” maybe a mile from the BCC, there were no cosplayers, or congoers of any type, and the lightly packed dining room of the pub we had selected was soon the site of a conversation between the four of us about how the community had changed. Crispin had been part of the convention community since almost the beginning. He remembered how those early cons had been very anime-centric, and the fans hungry for more information. As a media/industry guest, he also had been somewhat insulated to the shift from anime-culture to community-culture that had been so dramatic in the past 4 years. He had not seen the subtle (and not-so-subtle) shifts that altered the dynamic and motivations of the attendees as a whole. As we sat there, talking about Convergence theory and the changing times, it made me ask myself a question- one that really has no solid answer, only observations.

Has Otakon exceeded its intended scope? What is the point of the con now, as the motivations and practices of a new generation of fans have overtaken older concepts? Has Otakon, still a bastion of Japanese media and culture appreciation, evolved?

I would think so. It’s become something more than just a fan convention- its become a destination all its own. It’s  been that way for years now- all roads (at least on the East Coast) do lead to Otakon, that special pilgrimage that needs to be experienced at least once. Overwhelming or not, it’s a rite of passage all its own, but one of those rites that has the potential to pull in as many people as possible, and keep them there. New fans or old-timers, it’s still living up to its mission statement, and managing to accommodate all the needs of every fan who walks through the doors- from the staunch Japanophile to the artist and creative, to the confused teenager who’s wondering what they’ve gotten themselves into. Otakon is, and always will be, a place for every fan, everywhere.

Lines or not.

By Isabel On 1 Jun, 2013 At 02:47 AM | Categorized As Reviews, Toys and Merchandise | With 0 Comments
IMG_4460

No Gravatar

There are not a lot of special product for straight otaku girls out there. And just what do I mean by that? I’m mostly talking about the shortage of body pillows, wall scrolls, sexy figures, and many other similar products featuring attractive male characters. Do a search for “pillow” on a reputable website and the amazing majority in that department is female characters. So once I saw this nice reasonably priced official body pillow I had to get my mitts on it immediately instead of risking the possibility of having it sold it. For $24.99 I can’t complain about what I got.

pillowixbThe only description of the body pillow was just 70 cm so I knew it wouldn’t be the type of body pillow you could give a full body embrace to but at least provides someone to hug on lonely nights. Any other detail about the pillow was left out, which is where I come in. The listing looked like this, and I was super excited because the unbearably attractive bodyguard, Soshi Metsukami, from one of my new favorite shows Inu X Boku Secret Service had his very own pillow, despite the fact THERE ISN’T AN ACCURATE FIGURE OF HIM YET (as a figure collector I hate that the show has no figure replicas of their male leads whom are all attractive) at least I can now have a body pillow of him.

I suffered over ten days of agony waiting for him to arrive and was quite excited when I got him. The pillow has no packaging and was put in a clear bag for convenience so the first thing I saw was the side the listing didn’t show, I was hoping maybe a full body shot of him like with Ririchiyo would be there but it was just a plain purple side. I like to call those sides “3D sensors.”

Plain purple side

But now to the interesting side, it does look much better in real life. The quality of the printing is of high caliber and, dare I say, the colors are vivid and makes Soshi look like he came straight out of the anime (or manga, whatever). I love the checkered background which makes it stand out from other pillows and Soshi’s nine-tailed fox manifestation in the background is a nice touch.

IMG_4423IMG_4460

The most neat thing about this body pillow is that it comes as a pillow and it is not just a cover. This makes it a great deal because typically pillow covers are sold separately from the pillow itself. These are quite costly, and having to buy the pillow gives another hit in the wallet. I’d say typically $100 at least for both of them.

The pillow is 100% polyester which brings me to my only complain, it isn’t what I would call soft. However it’s still feels good enough to sleep with.

An authentic pillow has this label and tag with a sticker from Aniplex.

IMG_4448IMG_4458

IMG_4454

I hope this doesn’t become pirated as it is a reasonably priced official good. Usually my product reviews stop at this point, but this product can only be found in one place from my research, so here is the link.

As more products fangirls can enjoy are released, I’ll try to cover the most I can. Just remember this, support the industry and show them you want this merchandise by buying it and they will deliver.

Working-In-The-Games-Industry-Breaking-Into-The-Biz

No Gravatar

*Volunteer Positions* While evaluating the state of the Gaming Journalism scene, I noticed that we at Real Otaku Gamer has a unique approach when covering geek/otaku culture. As the site gets restructured and we go into our 3rd year, we are looking to create opportunities that will help the site become more robust and varied with coverage. Real Otaku Gamer has a global vision, we accept writers from all over the world.

These new job positions are going to help Real Otaku Gamer become more organized and develop a bigger community so we can grow as a brand. These positions are volunteer only as we are a small site. As we grow so will the sponsors and hopefully revenue.

IF HAVE ANY QUESTIONS ABOUT THE POSITIONS, Email us at feedback@realotakugamer.com

These New Positions are as follows:

1. Community Manager: You will be taking care of the daily running of the site. You will work along side the Editor in Chief and other Admins on the site with promoting the site and helping build a brand. You must have good communication skills.

2.Marketing and PR: You will be responsible for all Public Relations with companies and the community. You must have good communication skills and be able to relate to people of a number of levels. You will also run contests and giveaways.

3.Managing Editor: You will work closely with all staff to make sure the posts we produce, are up to our standards.

4.Social Media Manager: You will be in charge of growing our social networking presence. You will be working close to the senior staff.

5. Assistant to Editor in Chief: You will assist the E.I.C. in the daily running of the site.

6.Advertising and Promotion: contact us for more details.

7.Art Director: contact us for more details.

8.Podcast Producer/Editor: contact us for more details.

9.Video Producer/Editor :contact us for more details.

Now, the next few positions are for the Real Otaku Gamer Specialists. These positions are dedicated for people who want to cover a specific genre/category. This is where your inner Otaku can really shine.

1. PC

2. Mobile/Tablet

3. Tech

4. Anime

5. Manga

6. Comics

7. Nintendo

8. Sony

9. Microsoft

10. Movies/Television

11. Asian Cinema

12.Indie Games

13.Toys/models and Merchandise

14.Convention Coverage

15.Cosplay and Cosplay Culture

To apply for these positions, you must first submit a writing sample and once the sample is approved, submit an small essay telling us why we should pick you for the job you are interested in. An essay is not necessary for all positions. Deadline to have the samples submitted is May 20th, 2013. We must have all essays in my May 17th. Send the Essays and Samples to feedback@realotakugamer.com.

If you have any questions about any of the positions and their responsibilities, just email us at feedback@realotakugamer.com or go to the Twitter and Facebook pages. Thanks you for your time.

Andre Tipton

Founder/Editor in Chief

REAL OTAKU GAMER is using WP-Gravatar