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By Jonathan Balofsky On 10 May, 2017 At 10:38 AM | Categorized As News, PlayStation, Playstation Vita, Portable/Mobile Gaming, ROG News | With 0 Comments

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Revenant Saga_20170301104043

Kemco sent out the following

 

 

KEMCO proudly announces the release of Revenant Saga for PlayStation® set to hit the North American PlayStation®Storetoday. The game will be made available for PlayStation®4, PlayStation®3 and PlayStation®Vita supporting Cross Buy. Standard price is $14.99, but PS Plus users will have a special 10% OFF discount during the first two weeks! For more information, please visit the PlayStation Store.

Story

After his childhood friend’s parents are stricken with the plague, Albert meets one Dr. Moreau, and agrees to participate in a trial experiment for the promise of a potential cure. However, when the experiment itself proves to be a facade for turning humans into revenants and the Rystorian Order suddenly intervenes, Albert is left with the soul of a demon inside him vying for control of his body. Realizing the same mad scientist who tricked him is also responsible for his childhood friend’s death and many others close to him, he sets out on a journey alone to exact revenge on the man who ruined his life…
However, after crossing paths with revenant hunter slash potential valkyrie, Esther, and being pushed into joining her cause, Albert begins to seriously wonder if or how long he will be able to keep his secret from his new companion. To make matters worse, she has been endowed with the very powers capable of vanquishing those like him!

Stunning 3D Battles

Smooth controls and a fluid camera make 3D battles in Revenant Saga stress free and perfect for PlayStation! In addition, powerful skills with brilliant effects enhance the RPG experience like never before! And with auto and semi-auto functions, battles are as simple as the touch of a button!

Features

What you should know: Revenant Saga will incorporate over 30+ hours of gameplay woven around Albert’s elaborate journey. This includes a variety of unique subquests, in-battle transformation systems, as well as a weapon forging system allowing players to make entirely unique weapons! Also, Revenant Saga will provide an entirely brand new feature to the PS KEMCO gaming experience: players will be able to earn platinum trophies as a reward for progress and effort spent throughout the game!

 

Source: PR Email

 

Kemco’s RPGs , while not the most original, have been great games and a lot of fun.  Revenant Saga looks like it will continue this trend and be a great game to spend time on.

By Jonathan Balofsky On 30 Apr, 2017 At 04:42 AM | Categorized As Editorials, Featured, News, Opinion, PlayStation, ROG News | With 0 Comments

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God of War for PlayStation 4  is coming soon and will be set not in Greek mythology but instead in Norse mythology. This is a great way to shake things up but I do have some concerns about this.  The previous trilogy was about Kratos’ vengeance against the gods, sparked by his vendetta against Ares, the Greek god of war. Given the way media often likes to make many mythological figures similar to ones in other cultures, it makes me concerned that the developers will try and give Kratos an enmity with the Norse god of war, Tyr.

In fact, many modern fictional portrayals of Tyr use him as a villain,, and this includes story arcs in the Marvel Comics Thor series. However, this is completely wrong, and usually is the result of writers using him as an Ares stand in. To be fair, the Romans did identify Tyr with Mars when they discussed the Germanic peoples and their beliefs, but there is another issue there. Ares and the Roman god Mars were not the same figure, and in many ways Mars is incompatible with Ares. Mars was the second most important god to many Romans and was a noble god of war, a protector god and a patron of farmers. Tyr is also incompatible with the myths of Ares, since among other things, in the original Germanic myths, he was king of the gods, and it was only centuries later that the cult of Odin got more prominent and Odin became the top god. The writings of the Romans about the Germanics clearly record Tyr, referred to as Mars, as King of the god, but did acknowledge, Mercury (Odin) as an extremely popular one, albeit  only among certain warriors.

Another key point is that Tyr wasn’t the only god of war among the Norse people actually. In fact, most of the Norse gods were war gods in some form, and Odin and Freyja were two of the other important war gods. Tyr had A domain in war, and that was as the patron of soldiers, the common warriors, and of personal combat. Tyr was god of a number of things besides this however, and these include wisdom, justice, law, honor, bravery, compassion. When it came to war, he was the incarnation of the noble and protective aspects of it, and in many ways was the Norse counterpart to the goddess Athena, the Greek goddess of war and wisdom.

An actual evil god of war for the Norse would actually be Odin surprisingly enough. Odin is thought of as the king of the god, but in truth was only really important to the nobility of the Norse people and  this was only centuries after the Germanic people met the Romans. bear in mind, most of the surviving Norse myths are from Iceland, and were written for the nobility. Odin being the top god was a result of the Nobles preferring him and having stories written accordingly. these stories were later Christianized by later writers, and many surviving stories only come from Christian sources.

The common soldiers did not generally prefer Odin and actually preferred Tyr and would dedicate their weapons to him. The farmers in turn worshipped Freyr and Thor,  who were the fertility gods of the crops. Of course Thor was also the protector god for many. Another thing that isn’t widely known about Odin was that he had many names and one of them was Oathbreaker. The breaking of oaths was big taboo is Norse culture and many sagas involved this and the damage it brought. Furthermore, as mentioned Tyr’s domain in war was of the common soldier, and the protective aspects of war, but Odin’s domain was the berserkers and the destructive aspects of war . The goddess Freyja was also associated with destructive aspects of war and was noted for her blood thirst, similar to the Morgana.

Odin just makes far more sense to be the overall villain right from the beginning of the new series.. He did many bad things in the myths that he later suffered for and can be easily argued as outright villainous.  His actions, many of which were to prevent Ragnarok, actually caused it, and he often made life worse for many. It should be noted, that he was originally a death god, but his domain there was not of honorable death. Tyr was noted for being the bravest of the gods and did the things no one else was willing to.

As a history buff, and a mythology nerd, I hope the writers have properly researched the myths and don’t just take the easy route. Norse myth is very interesting and full of grey and grey morality. It had a very different value system than the Greeks, but at the same time, a lot of it is misunderstood. I hope I have cleared up some of it here.

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I recently had the chance to speak with composer Samuel Laflamme. The composer for such games as Outlast, offered insight into game music composition and game design. Have a read and enjoy.

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JB:  What are your biggest influences in music?

 

 

SL:  I’ve grow up listening so many soundtrack scores tha choosing one is a real challenge. But Danny Elfman’s Batman was the first score I really touched me. I’ve always been in love with all the John Williams Star Wars series and also the Steven Spielberg/John Williams collaborations. As a teenager, I discovered Hans Zimmer’s action scores from the 90s, and it was my king of “rock” period, while my friends at the time were listening to Nirvana and Guns & Roses…Nine Inch Nails, Bjork and Radiohead were, for me, my electro-rock-pop-industrial influences. I really liked other bands like Board of Canada. Or electronic musician like Amon Tobin.

More recently I love what Johann Johannsson brings to Hollywood movies. I’m also a profound lover of old Bernard Hermann scores. To me Vertigo is one of the best masterpieces in Hollywood history.

 

 

JB:  Who inspired you to go into music?

 

 

SL:  Again, Danny Elfman’s Batman score was really important. I listened in loop so many times Descent into mystery. While I’m writing those words, I’m listening to it on a youtube video, and it gives me the chills.

Also John Williams with all his 80s scores, from E.T. to Star Wars, by Indiana Jones… Some tracks at the end of Empire Strikes Back were in my top revealing music experience of all time! (including Darth Vader’s march and Escape from Cloud city).

 

 

JB:  What have been some of the challenges for composing music for video games?

 

 

SL: I’m not a hardcore gamer, nor an intense horror fan… So Outlast was my first video game score, and the reason why I was on this project is that Philippe Morin (co-founder of Red Barreld Games) and I shared the same vision on the role of a score in a movie or a video game. It adds something to the story, or the gaming experience, that you don’t see at the screen. I love to create a score that tells something else beyond the information given to us by images. For example, if you’re only walking in a quiet corridor, I would love to add a strange, uncomfortable score that make you imagine that anything could happen at any moments… Phil named it “free gameplay development” because they didn’t have to invent events to create fear. Another good example, is creating a quiet, soft score in middle of a gory scene. It makes you feel so weird that this amplifies the strangeness of the moment. The Cliché of it is childish music box score used to create something really scary from a music that is supposed to be a lullaby.

 

 

JB:  What styles do you like to experiment with in your work?

 

 

SL: I don’t have any preference on the style, but what’s important for me is to be creative. If I’m forced to compose music from temp tracks, or strongly loved references, I really don’t like it because I will struggle to be inventive with something so restrictive. The most important key is working with creative collaborators who aren’t afraid to let me try new things. I can always step back, but I prefer to try new things and push the limits than just stay within the references.

 

 

JB:  Related to the above, what styles would you like to bring in to your work?

 

 

SL:  Again, it’s all about how creative a score can be to tell the story of a movie, video game, etc. I’ve done so many styles in TV shows during the 10 years before doing Outlast. I had chance to explore all those styles but the greatest music I’ve done was when I was allowed to create something surprising and new. In music for image, you can use whatever kind of music for almost whatever image you’re scoring for. And that’s the beauty of it. The only important thing to consider is what story we want to tell. Do you remember “A Knight’s Tale” using rock music in a medieval movie? It worked well! Or whatever Tarantino movies using surf guitars… Or Hans Zimmer Joker’s theme… Or Bernard Hermann using only strings for Psycho (because of the monochrome aspect of the image) and at the time, strings made reference to love scenes… Now using high pitch staccati strings in cluster is a cliché. All of it is about being creative. How can I use music to tell the story.

Bernard Hermann used Brass in his Vertigo Ouverture to imitate the fog horns of San Francisco. How could I be creative in Outlast 2 compared to Outlast 1, by inspiring myself by the new locations, caracters, etc and then being conscient of all the elements that stay from Outlast 1 to Outlast 2 in the game.

 

 

JB:  What are some of your favourite video games soundtracks?

 

 

SL:  I’m a guy from the 80s. I still REALLY love the Zelda theme. It’s one of the classics I know, but still so, so, so good!! I really liked the Mortal Kombat music during the 90s. It’s might be funny but I do remember some good themes from Echo The dolphin on Sega Genesis.I really liked Joel McNeely’s Shadows of the Empire. To me, he’s the one who should be hired for the next Star Wars when John Williams won’t be able to continue. I do remember the excellent music of the first Warcraft and Starcraft.

 

 

JB:  What would you like to see done with video game music going forward?

 

 

SL:  I think we are in the golden age of video games right now. Movies aren’t as interesting as in the past, We have all those super hero movies, or all those really indie movies that employ more radio tunes then scores. Arrival was a revelation for me, but it is in a rare zone for film industry right now. I think tv shows are more originals than movies, and also some really good games. Because I’m a movie fan, I love great storytelling. I love so much the Paolo Sorrentino’s movies (La Grande Bellezza, Youth). But I know it’s marginal in this whole Hollywood world. I think more cinematic video games are fresh air in the freedom of writing and Outlast is right there. You wouldn’t see this kind of edginess in movies now… I don’t think so. I’m not talking about the goriness, but more about the freedom of the form. The freedom of creating something that good, without asking to the rest of the world their opinion like all those screen test and focus groups. I feel like games and TV shows take risks right now that are really interesting in new avenue of story telling and experiences.

 

 

JB:  Do you feel video game music is held back still by anything?

 

 

SL:  It always depends on the creative people who work on a project. I’ve been really lucky with Red Barrels, they let me try things, and I really appreciate this!

It’s fundamental for me to push out limits and find new way to express myself musically.

The only thing that could stop my ideas would be the small amount of music scoring knowledge a creative director, a game developper or a movie director could have. Then I have to educate what I try to do and it’s really daunting.

 

 

JB:  What are some of the challenges in composing for a horror game?

 

 

SL:  The first main challenge is to be new and original. There are so many clichés it’s so difficult to create something new especially in that genre. I have chance to work with collaborators who invite me to explore and push boundaries. This is the only way I can find something new. It so rare you wake up in the morning with the eureka idea! You have to struggle, explore pitch ideas, and see what’s still strong and stand out at the end.

The second is to be “musical”. It’s easy to just make chaotic music to create fear. The real challenge is to create something scary but hooky and memorable. I think you have to have a tune at the end. What makes the Joker’s theme in The Dark Knight so memorable? It’s a clear, bold and original idea. And it’s repeated a lot in the movie so you can associate it easily to the awesome character. I try to make a brilliant use of the most strong and memorable sounds I could find during the creative process, then I try to make you associate it to whatever I need to. For example, my cymbal sound from Outlast 1 was the icon for me, and I tried to push it at some important moment in Outlast 2.

 

 

 

JB:  What is the mindset that goes into composing for a horror game? How do you get the right ideas to put into your work?

 

 

SL:  I don’t know how the other composers work, but for me it’s a very personal and intimate journey into my deeper feelings. I have to refer and connect to my own fears and emotions. Like an actor probably. If I cannot connect to this, you won’t believe or be touched by what I try to tell. I don’t know why actually, but every time I composed too much using only my intellectual knowledge (analyzing my music), I didn’t keep those ideas at the end. Another good tester for me to see what works, or not, is the time. Because the creation of a game like Outlast 2 can take 2 years, it gives me the chance to see what’s still good after having listening it all this time.

 

 

JB:  Do you feel that horror game music is more intrinsically a part of the games?

 

 

SL:  Yes of course, but not because it’s horror, but because it’s a huge part of the gameplay. It’s part of the core, the DNA of the game. Any romantic movie without excellent score would look like cheesy. When the emotion is a key element of the story or gameplay, the presence of an excellent score or music is fundamental to complete the experience!

 

 

 

JB:  What are some of the ways you innovated with the soundtracks for your games?

 

 

SL: By choosing different instruments for Outlast 2, I based my choice on the locations in this new game. I wanted to try something else. I’m a strong believer that I could tell whatever emotion with whatever instrument. It’s always depend on a good interpretation of the instrument. A good musician can tell the whole range of emotion with his instrument, or at least can try to be creative enough to interpret it. In the case of Outlast 2, I tried to get out of my comfort zone by using guitars and basses, and banjo. I know it can sound ridiculous, but for my, as a non guitar player, it’s a challenge to experiment those instruments and trying to find new original tones and sounds that are iconic and scary. I did use some iconic sounds from Outlast 1 at some key moments where I felt it was important to brand something associated to Outlast sound palette. Also, at one point, I thought I told everything I could with those instruments, my assistants and I had to think about how creating new sounds still familiar to the guitars, basses sound palette but adding something new. After a year and half using the guitars and basses samples, I got rid of them and wanted something new for the next levels… So we invented a simple instrument that we called “the Redneck bass”. A simple piece of wood, with metal string attached on it. And it was captured by a contact microphone. It allowed us to explore a new large variety of scary sounds using a bow. “11 bring back our messiah!” in the album is a good example of the use of this instrument.

 

JB:  What would you like to be able to do with your composing that you cannot do yet?

 

 

SL:  Good question!! There are so many things to do. I don’t think it leads to one specific idea. I hope I will continue to have original ideas though out my career. I only wish to work with tremendous talented people who have confidence in me and let me explore and discover new way to approach my music in storytelling . Again I’ve been lucky with Red Barrels so far, they are real genius and the most important thing is they let me explore ideas. One thing I would love is to explore more Sci-Fi projects or more dramatic stories projects. I’m a fan of great script, original ones like the movie “Arrival” and would love to work with people like the ones on the story driven projects from Naughty Dog or Quantic Dream.

 

 

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Thank you again to Samuel Laflamme for doing this interview. You can follow him on twitter at @Samuel_Laflamme    

By Jonathan Balofsky On 10 Apr, 2017 At 08:52 AM | Categorized As News, News, PC Games, PlayStation, ROG News, Xbox 360/Xbox One | With 0 Comments

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Bethesda sent out the following

 

We’re thrilled to announce that Bethesda will host a Free Play Week for The Elder Scrolls Online starting tomorrow and running all the way through April 18 across all platforms, including PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC, and Mac. That’s seven full days for players to adventure through Tamriel, build and grow characters, conquer Delves and Dolmens, and unravel another incredibly epic Elder Scrolls saga.

 

Maybe you’ve been reading about our enormous new Chapter, The Elder Scrolls Online: Morrowind, coming June 6 or you’ve heard about how players at Game Informer, MMORPG.com, and MassivelyOP.com all voted ESO the ‘Best MMO of 2016’ and wondered what you might be missing. This is the best  chance to find out for free and hone your skills before heading back to Vvardenfell in June.

 

The Free Play Weekend will include:

 

  • No Restrictions: Access to the full The Elder Scrolls Online: Tamriel Unlimited base game. Go where you want, when you want, and with who you want in the massive open world and build your hero however you see fit.
  • 500 Free Crowns: Everyone receives 500 Crowns to spend in the Crown Store on fun costumes, unique pets, helpful scrolls, and more.
  • Progress Retention: Any characters created, Crown Packs purchased, or Crown Store items bought, as well as any progress made during the Free Play Week will carry over when you purchase the game.
  • Try and Buy … At a Discount: During the Free Play Week, you’ll enjoy a discounted price on either The Elder Scrolls Online: Tamriel Unlimited (the base game) or The Elder Scrolls Online: Gold Edition, which includes the base game as well as the four major DLC packs: Imperial City, Orsinium, Thieves Guild, and The Dark Brotherhood.

Whether you’re looking to quest online with your friends, or just want to head back to Tamriel by yourself for another epic Elder Scrolls adventure, ESO provides you the freedom and flexibility to play how you want to play.

 

How and When to Get into the Free Play Week

Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and Steam players can begin downloading tomorrow at 10am eastern.

 

Players should navigate to The Elder Scrolls Online: Tamriel Unlimited on the PlayStation Store, the Xbox Store, or Steam and download the game. Once the game is downloaded and players have created an account, they can login and play immediately.

Source: PR Email

The Elder Scrolls Online is a truly unique MMO. It started out with a rocky launch but has truly come into its own as a worthy entry in The Elder Scrolls series. I fully recommend checking out this free play week. Now is the time to try it out if you were ever curious, or if the upcoming Morrowind expansion stoked your interest.

By Jonathan Balofsky On 7 Apr, 2017 At 01:44 PM | Categorized As News, Otaku Music, PlayStation, ROG News | With 0 Comments

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Atlus sent out the following

 

 

Atlus Co., Ltd. (Setagayaku Tokyo, Chief Executive Officer: Akira Nomoto) announced that following the launch of the critically acclaimed Persona 5 in North America and Europe, the game has shipped more than 1.5 million copies worldwide.

To celebrate the launch of the game, there will be a Persona live concert event on Aug. 2 at the Yokohama Arena in Yokohama, Japan. Please stay tuned for upcoming news on Persona 5 and the Persona series in the future!
Persona 5 is a game about the internal and external conflicts of a group of troubled youth who live dual lives. They have the typically ordinary day-to-day of a Tokyo high-schooler – attending class, after school activities and part-time jobs. But they also undertake fantastical adventures by using otherworldly powers to enter the hearts of people. Their power comes from the Persona, the Jungian concept of the “self;” the game’s heroes realize that society forces people to wear masks to protect their inner vulnerabilities, and by literally ripping off their protective mask and confronting their inner selves do the heroes awaken their inner power, and use it to strive to help those in need. Ultimately, the group of Phantom Thieves seeks to change their day-to-day world to match their perception and see through the masks modern-day society wears.
Persona 5 is now available in the Americas and Europe, for PlayStation 4 and PlayStation 3. The game is rated M by the ESRB.
It is great to hear that Persona 5 has done so well. The game is amazing and deserves a large audience. Hopefully it will continue to sell well. Let us hope that the upcoming mainline Shin Megami Tensei game also sell well.
Source: PR Email.
By Jonathan Balofsky On 6 Apr, 2017 At 09:59 AM | Categorized As News, News, PC Games, PlayStation, ROG News, Xbox 360/Xbox One | With 0 Comments

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Bethesda has released a new trailer for Prey. This trailer details the gadgets and hardware used within the game.

Welcome to the Hardware Labs aboard Talos I. It’s here that many of the station’s gadgets, gears and weapons have been built. Take a look at just a few of the items you’ll have at your disposal when facing the alien threat in Prey. Along with a wide range of abilities (both human and alien), Morgan Yu has a full arsenal of killer gear. From his simple wrench to a powerful shotgun to more exotic devices, Morgan has more than enough options to suit his needs.

Prey will be available on May 5, 2017, on PlayStation 4, Xbox One and PC.

Prey is looking absolutely amazing. The game is set to be a big hit this year, and will hopefully be the start of a new franchise for Bethesda. Will you be getting the game?

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I have always loved pinball. Ever since I was a child, I have loved pinball machines and pinball videogames. Maybe it was playing NES pinball, or Alien Crush, I just found a love of both the machines and the video games. As such, I was a big fan of Zen Studios work. I hadn’t played some of their new boards in years, but one set that stood out above all others was their Bethesda pack.

Imagine taking Fallout 4, DOOM and Skyrim and turning them into pinball games, and at the same time retaining almost everything about the games. These are not just Bethesda themed pinball boards, they are the games fully adapted into pinball games, complete with game mechanics and identity.

Skyrim Pinball is nothing short of amazing. It retells the story of Skyrim through pinball and stays true to the game. It has the iconic music, it has leveling up and boss battles, and you have to watch your health and stamina at all times. You will go through dungeons, you will pick up loot and sort through and inventory and even craft items. I was absolutely blown away by the amount of detail put into the game. Yes its a stripped down version, but the essence is all still there. I had to be pulled away from the game just to be reminded that I had other obligations, that is how into it I got. The Skyrim board alone makes this worth getting. But it isn’t the only board.

DOOM Pinball was like getting hit with sensory overload in the best way possible. Great music, great visuals, good enemies and fights, I would never have thought it possible but it works. This follows the basic storyline of the new game and incorporates several elements from it, all done in the best way possible to keep the feeling despite the different format. I will even go so far as to say, that this particular board felt like more of a sequel to Alien Crush Pinball than the actual sequel for the Wii did .

Fallout Pinball is where things fell a bit short. I admit this may be because I am not extremely familiar with the Fallout games as much as others, but it felt like adapting many elements just got in the way. With Skyrim and Doom inventory and battles felt fluid and easy even if it took a while to get used to. With fallout, it felt way too clunky at times, but I can still appreciate the work done on this. The visuals are amazing and the music was good, but to me this just felt like the weak entry.

Overall, I would definitely give this a look at. My issues with the Fallout board likely have to do with my unfamiliarity with Bethesda’s entries, and fans might will like it. The other two boards however, were nothing but awesome. DOOM and Skyrim individually would make the purchase worth it, as they are some of the best pinball boards ever made. Fun, exhilarating and with an amazing amount of detail, these will suck you in fast.

I fully recommend checking this out.

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Warning: Spoilers ahead for The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim. If you have not played the game yet, be warned that this will discuss one of the major side quests of the game.

The following is a theory I have had for some time about something in The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim. The Silver Hand are a group of werewolf hunters who are enemies of the companions, but we don’t really know much about them. But there are some hints from the game’s lore that may point to a backstory that explains their actions much more.

The Companions were the group led by Ysgramor in his conquest of Skyrim from the Falmer. They became established soon after as the warrior’s guild. They had strong anti elven sentiments for a long time, and did not allow elves to join as full companions In fact, they had issues with most non Nords, although they accepted non Nord Humans into their ranks and eventually grew to respect them after Cirroc The Lofty joined. He was of Redguard descent and changed how the companions treated human outsiders, when he was made Harbinger, especially since that was the time period when the Nords became obsessed with Nordic identity after being Atmorans culturally. The elves however, were still discriminated against until Henantier the Outsider joined. He was made a servant but slowly earned his way up over the years.  He became respected by the new members and after one of his pupils was made harbinger, he gained some level of respect. When the harbinger died of old age, he shocked the companions by appointing Henantier as the new harbinger. This led to fierce arguments and many left the companions over this, although most remained and the tradition of tolerance and acceptance became part of the companions.

But what does this have to do with the Silver Hand? One thing that always stuck out was how the Silver Hand actively targeted the companions and stole the fragments of Wuuthrad, the Axe of Ysgramor. Then the idea hit me. What if the Silver Hand were originally a group made from those who left the companions? They seem to have existed for many centuries, and this could mean they have had many incarnations. As the companions’ curse of lycanthropy is relatively recent, it is possible the Silver Hand as a group took on that identity because they have a grudge against the companions. They felt the companions lost their way, and that their new group are the true heirs of Ysgramor.

However, the Silver Hand also are pretty diverse in their membership, which would seem to work against this idea. But that isn’t so. It could easily be explained that over the years, their whole identity became defined less by the ideas of Ysgramor and more by being enemies of the companions. In fact, it could be argues that by the time period Skyrim is set in, the original reasons are long forgotten and all the group knows is that the companions are their enemies.

Of course this is only a  theory, but I present this to you all to get your opinion. What do you think?

By Jonathan Balofsky On 5 Apr, 2017 At 12:14 AM | Categorized As News, PlayStation, ROG News | With 0 Comments

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Atlus has released a launch trailer for Persona 5.  Most of the necessary details are known now, but the trailer does show us some interesting things.

Persona 5 has been long awaited and is finally here, we will have a review in the coming days. In the meantime, please share with us your thoughts on the game so far.

 

 

 

 

By Jonathan Balofsky On 3 Apr, 2017 At 11:59 AM | Categorized As News, News, News, NINTENDO, PC Games, PlayStation, ROG News, Xbox 360/Xbox One | With 0 Comments

No GravatarOver the Moon Games sent out the following

 

 

Over The Moon’s The Fall Part 2: Unbound aims to bring the tradition of the mind-bending sci-fi classics to the Nintendo Switch

Releasing in 2017 for Xbox One, PlayStation 4, PC, Mac and Linux, indie developer Over the Moon Games, today announced that The Fall Part 2: Unbound will also be coming to Nintendo Switch.

Is Artificial Intelligence a Threat to Humanity?

Can it be Bound? What Binds You?

We’ve all heard the adage: the best science fiction stories are the ones that, while being great entertainment, also point to something more philosophical, inviting players (or readers, traditionally) to think. Over The Moon aims to join that fine tradition with their highly anticipated upcoming sequel, The Fall Part 2: Unbound, in which players take on the role of A.R.I.D, an abandoned and broken AI who struggles to survive a collapse in her operating parameters. ARID must re-establish her boundaries by attempting to build her own rules before a dark, mysterious, and invasive process snuffs her out for good.

 

How then, does ARID do this? Over The Moon draws inspiration from contemporary issues, says John Warner, The Fall’s director: “There’s a growing debate about the looming threat of artificial intelligence. Can we build an AI that serves us?  One that we can control?  Or at the very least, one that is psychologically healthy and isn’t a threat to us?  For that matter, what is ‘health’? Can it be defined for the sake of building an AI, and do humans even have a good definition for that? How do you know that you’re healthy?”  

The key, of course, is to keep the game exciting and fun, allowing gameplay to carry much of the story-telling. ARID will invade other robots in a desperate attempt to get their help, and will be forced to work within their personal quirks and operating parameters, creating an opportunity for a truly unique set of challenges. Furthermore, as ARID begins understanding her hosts on a deeper level, she will be able to take perceptual mechanics from one robot into another. Players will solve puzzles by perceiving the environment from different perspectives and comparing the information they find in creative ways… served up with a helping of The Fall’s signature dark humour.

 

“Having a robust way of perceiving the world is a pretty good starting point to talk about psychological health” says Warner, “And by making gameplay around these mechanics, we can explore a lot of fun ideas without being overly cerebral or choking the game with philosophical dialogue.”

 

But that’s just the start, according to the team at Over The Moon. The Fall Part 2: Unbound aims to put players in perspectives that they’ve never experienced in a video game before. With a host of unusual characters, it explores themes of artificial intelligence, the value of personal boundaries and respecting others. Its gameplay and its story are specifically designed to make players reflect on these ideas, through the lens of a familiar Metroidvania meets Point and Click Adventure framework. The Fall Part 2: Unbound is made for players who have been waiting for the conceptual underpinning of games to catch up with their technological artistry.

 

Releasing in 2017 for Xbox One, PlayStation 4, Nintendo Switch, PC, Mac and Linux, The Fall Part 2: Unbound is a bold leap forward for video game storytelling

The fall was an amazing indie game that brought a lot of innovation to the table. Its next chapter will no doubt increase the scope of the story and make things more intriguing.

Source: PR Email