Otaku Music: There Will Never Be Another Michael Jackson
By Jonathan Balofsky On 3 Nov, 2017 At 11:26 AM | Categorized As Editorials, Featured, Opinion, Otaku Music, ROG News | With 0 Comments

No Gravatar

 

Halloween has just passed, and among other things made for the holiday was Wayne Brady recording a 30’s style jazz cover of Michael Jackson’s Thriller.

 

 

I had been listening to Jackson’s music and re-watching his music videos for a while now and watching this cover made me appreciate Jackson even more. It also made me realize just how there will never be someone to equal Jackson ever.

Michael Jackson wasn’t satisfied with just doing the same as others and did everything better. His music videos were unlike anything before or since. His video for “Thriller” was less a music video than a short musical film and it pushed peoples’ expectations for what could be done with music videos. His collaboration with John Landis helped elevate music videos to true art rather than just an accompanying video for a song.  The dance scene is often imitated still to this day, and has shown up in everything from South Park to the Japan exclusive Splatterhouse nes/famicom game. It is a  shame most people today like to only reference it as a meme, as it is a video that other musicians can only aspire to come close to.

Jackson’s dancing was on another level as well. His moves in “Smooth Criminal” and “Bad” ( another music video that pushed expectations), were the stuff of legends. Whereas musicians are a form of artists, Jackson was one of the few musicians to be a an artist capable of multiple forms. His music was excellent and engaging, his dancing unmatched and his input into music videos helped change what was expected. He invented new styles of dance and music and constantly reinvented himself., and like any true artist he was never satisfied.

 

 

A lot of people view his music as inoffensive, and he was called the King of Pop, but the truth is that there was a message in his work. He often touched on racial issues even if many ( mostly white people) didn’t realize it. “Black and White” was the most blatant with this but “Bad”, also touched on this, though most people don’t seem to have seen the full video, but rather the shortened one. The full version touched on more serious issues as well as issues that were considered to be uncomfortable by some because of the racial message. In truth Jackson was talking about society in all its ways and it was a message that needed to be heard.

 

Jackson had to deal with repercussions of fame as we all know, and he even turned some of the problems into his music. Billie Jean was a legendary song and only Michael could have done it the way it was done.

 

Whatever stories there were about him are not relevant to this discussion. I am speaking of Jackson as an artist and one who brought everything he did to new heights. Thet ruth is that Jackson was a global superstar on a level that had simply never been seen before. His talent was unequalled and though many have tried to bill themselves as his successor, none will ever succeed. Jackson was a once in a lifetime phenomenon, a living legend. You cannot recapture that talent ever, and it is a shame that young people will never know such a global star in their lifetime. That being said, Jackson’s music is still here for people to listen to, and his videos and recorded concerts can still be watched and viewed in awe of his talent. If you will excuse me now, I need to listen to some more of the King.

Leave a comment

XHTML: You can use these tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>


%d bloggers like this: