You Are Browsing ' Mobile Gaming ' Category

1920_ScrewAttack

No Gravatar1920_ScrewAttack

 

I recently had the chance to speak with Austin Harper of ScrewAttack Games and Sam Beddoes of FreakZone Games. We discussed how some of their projects came to be, what the future holds and more. Please take a read below.

JB: ScrewAttack is best known as a gaming website. What led to you guys deciding to make your own games?

AH: We are all gamers at heart and we’re really passionate about video games; we decided to take that passion for games and apply that to design. I think all of us at some point in time have daydreamed about being able to make a video game. It’s kind of a childhood dream, you know? We were just very fortunate in having a platform and a great community to support us in trying to fulfill that dream.

JB:  ScrewAttack came out with a rather interesting mobile game a few years ago called Texting of the Bread. What was the inspiration behind that?

AH: Haha, it was very much inspired by the Dreamcast game Typing of the Dead. Essentially we were sitting around talking about how cool Typing of the Dead was, and wondering why nothing like that had been done in the mobile market. We really liked the punny name we came up with, so we decided to take the theme and run with it — hence the main character with a cow strapped to her back and the hordes of gingerbread men.

JB:  What lead to the Nerd being a character in the game? Was it a test run to see how he would be in his own game?

AH: Honestly, we were just really happy that we got to make a game, a real game, with our name on it and wanted to share it with our friends.?

JB:  How was the reception to Texting of The Bread? I understand that one mobile version of the game itself was cancelled?.

AH: The reception was actually pretty good, and we wanted to bring the game to Android, but at the time the ShiVa Engine we built the game in just didn’t have Android support. Our developer made a few test builds anyway, all of them had really ridiculous bugs, like not being able to close the application without removing your battery… Long story short, we parted ways with the developers before we ever got the build completed. Though, you may hear something about our mobile titles in the near future.

JB:  Angry Video Game Nerd Adventures is probably the most well known of the games ScrewAttack has produced. How did it come about?

AH: We were talking about making a new game, specifically considering the Angry Video Game Nerd franchise, but we didn’t have a developer in mind. Around that time, Sam Beddoes of FreakZone Games reached out to us, asking us to do a review of his game, Manos: The Hands of Fate. We really liked the game and got along with Sam pretty well, and he happened to mention he was a big fan of the AVGN series. The rest just kind of clicked.

JB: Sam, how did you come to be the developer that worked on AVGN adventures? Did ScrewAttack reach out to you? What was the experience like to work on an officially licensed game based of a reviewer of crappy games? Was it intimidating?

SB: A few years back I made a similar project “MANOS: The Hands of Fate” – A retro-style adaptation of the infamously bad movie of the same name. It was a pet project which did pretty well. The idea was to adapt the movie in the way movies were adapted to games back in the 80s on the NES, and a lot of my research involved binge-watching AVGN, who I had been a big fan of for quite some time, to try and capture that “LJN” feel. Also being a big fan of ScrewAttack, I approached them to try and get MANOS some coverage, and the retro style impressed them, at which point they allowed me to pitch a collaboration to them – that pitch was AVGN Adventures, a game I’d dreamed of making since before I even started MANOS. They liked the pitch, and my life was changed!

JB:  You brought to AVGN Adventures some elements from your game Manos the Hands of Fate, based off that infamous movie. I’m curious how that game came about, being based on a notorious film from decades ago.

SB: MANOS is an interesting one. I’ve been fond of watching terrible movies with friends for as far back as I can remember, and when I caught Mystery Science Theater 3000: The Movie on TV I ended up obsessively watching that show on the internet (we didn’t have the show here in England, only the movie, which was essentially just a higher budget episode!), and through MST3K I discovered the film MANOS. Since I’d been making games as a hobby since the late 90s, my “bad movie buddy” Chris and I always joked about making a game of MANOS, how it’d be adapted, how it’d play. We joked around with the idea of a point and click adventure, for example. Whilst reading about the history of that film one day I found out that the film and everything in it was in the public domain due to the director’s failure to take all the necessary steps to copyright a work back in the time it came out (similar to what happened with George A. Romero’s “Night of the Living Dead”, thus giving birth to the entire zombie genre), and I was amused to think that I actually COULD make MANOS due to this! I believe I was thinking about AVGN when I realized how much fun it’d be to adapt MANOS the way game developers adapted movies on the NES in the 80s, and so I went for it – The main idea would be to “celebrate badness with something good”; to include all of the tropes of bad game adaptations and bad movies alike, but without making the game itself bad! Not long after the release of the game, I was befriended by most of the remaining cast of the original film, so I suppose you could even say it’s the “official” video game adaptation at this point.

JB:  What is your philosophy to game design and what are some of your biggest influences and inspirations in gaming? I’m talking about both games and game developers.

 SB: I like to keep things simple, challenging, fun and exciting! My greatest influences on my platformers are Yoshi’s Island, Mega Man X and the original Sonic games, but I also find myself inspired by some modern indie developers like Edmund McMillan and the guys at WayForward. Of course not forgetting the masters themselves, Miyamoto, Inafune, Igarashi. There’s so much more, though. Games have been an enormous part of my life and they’ve never not been inspiring me, so it’s a tough question to ask!

JB:  What do you personally hope to Accomplish with AVGN adventures II? Will it come to consoles like the first game did?

SB: Regarding Consoles, that’s up to ScrewAttack to talk about, but obviously that’s something I really hope to see happen. As for the game itself, we’ve learned a lot since the first, so I hope not just to make fans of the original happy, but perhaps win over some people who weren’t too smitten with the first game as well!

JB: Austin, Disorder is an interesting game. How did that one come about and how has the reception been?

AH: Chad and Craig were walking the floor and checking out indie games down at SXSW Gaming when they came across Disorder. Both of the guys thought it was a really awesome game and spent the weekend hanging out with the Swagabyte Games team. After a night of playing games together and drinking, we decided to take on the project as the publisher. Disorder is a different tone than our other titles, it’s bit more serious in subject matter, but most everyone who has played it has responded pretty positively.

JB:  Jump ‘N’ Shoot is an awesome throwback to classic games but I have to ask, why is it on mobile devices only?

AH: Jump’N’Shoot Attack is kind of Sam’s passion project to try and bring a real platforming game experience to the mobile phone that gamers will enjoy.

JB:  Is there any chance there may one day be a Death Battle game? I understand it would be a licensing nightmare but you could use stand ins/obvious parodies for the real characters and even include Wiz and Boomstick (and Jocelyn).

AH: It has definitely been talked about, but at this point I can’t really say much either way.

JB:  Do you see ScrewAttack continuing to pursue video game production? If so, what are some genres that you would like to see tackled?

AH: I think, like with most things, we’ll continue doing it as long as it makes sense and people enjoy it. Being a super small publishing team, we try to focus on a limited number of projects so we can give proper attention to them all. I can say that I’m busy for the foreseeable future. I think one of the hardest genres to do well is horror.

JB:  Do you have any regrets about how things were done in any of the games ScrewAttack produced?

AH: Looking back, if we could do it over again we would have launched Texting of the Bread with a Free to play model.

JB: Have there been any games that ScrewAttack was producing that have ended up being cancelled along the way that people are not aware of?

AH: There have been a few publishing opportunities that didn’t pan out. One example was a small development team that disbanded before the contract was finalized. It’s a bummer, because it was an awesome game that will never see the light of day. I hope one day they reconnect and continue work on the game.

JB:  Do you have anything that you would like to say to the audience of Teal Otaku Gamer?

AH: Thanks so much for reading the interview! If you’re a fan of retro inspired games, we hope you’ll check out our stuff!

Thank you again for doing this.

 

You can follow ScrewAttack on Twitter at @ScrewAttack, Austin can be followed at @PotatoHound and Sam at @FreakZoneGames

 

203298

No GravatarSometimes there are very special games that will forever hold a place in the heart of gamers. Chrono Trigger is one of those games. It is a game that is often hailed as being one of the best RPGs of all time and, in many cases, can be considered on of the greatest games of all time, period. Here are the reasons why:

203298

Chrono Trigger is a role-playing game developed by Square (now Square Enix) for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System (SNES). The game was created by a team of extremely talented individuals, including Final Fantasy’s creator, Hironobu Sakaguchi. It was published in 1995 with critical success and was the third best-selling game of that year. Chrono Trigger was later ported to the PlayStation in 1999 and then repackaged in 2001 with Final Fantasy IV as “Final Fantasy Chronicles.” With such critical and commercial success, it has been later ported to the mobile platforms of the Nintendo DS, iOS, and Android. It is a revolutionary game that spawned the sequel Chrono Cross and gave a lot of fans some very happy memories.

The game follows Crono, a main character who never speaks during the game, Marle, a princess, and Lucca, Crono’s super-smart friend. During a Millennial Fair for the time period of AD 1000 in their world, Lucca and her father demonstrate a new teleporter. Unfortunately, it doesn’t work quite like it was supposed to and teleports Crono, Marle, and Lucca in time. They bounce around both forward and backward in time, learning about a creature named Lavos that wipes out civilization. The party is then determined to do what they can to save the world through time travel.

campfire

It is a fantastic story, filled with twists and turns. Players end up traveling between seven different eras with their distinct characters, setting, and feel. Along the way, you meet the wonderful characters of Robo, Ayla, Magus, and the best and coolest video game character of all time, Frog. That’s my opinion, and I’m sticking to it. Trust me, though. Frog is freaking amazing.

One of the many revolutionary aspects of Chrono Trigger was the possibility of multiple endings. However, there were other advancements including plot-related, character-driven sidequests. These may not seem like a big deal today, but in 1995, that was unheard of.

Though the game play is a fairly standard RPG, there were several new ideas to come forth as well. Done with beautiful two-dimensional graphics (that still look good, by the way), the player can roam around in an overworld typical of RPGs of the time and visit different areas. Each area has things to interact with, whether it be people to talk to, puzzles to solve, or enemies to defeat. One change to the traditional RPG is that Chrono Trigger has random encounters for enemies, some which may be visible and some that will ambush you. Unlike other RPGs at the time as well, the game’s battles take place in the same map area instead of being whisked off to a different screen.

chrono-trigger-sprites

During fights with enemies, Chrono Trigger uses an active battle approach. Each character can do an action based off of a personal timer that is affected by that character’s stats. Characters can either do a straight attack or use their Techs, which use their magic points. One unique feature for the time was the ability to do combined attacks with characters using the Techs. The characters can double or triple their Tech use to create an even greater effect.

The game play is a lot of fun and allows a player to use many tactics to defeat enemies. Another really cool element that Chrono Trigger officially introduced was the New Game+ feature that allowed players to keep their characters’ stats, techniques, and inventory when playing a new game. This helped players go through the multiple endings easier. Though this idea may have been used in earlier games, from my research, it does look like Chrono Trigger was the first to actually use the term “New Game+.” Pretty awesome, right?

nexusae0_2012-10-29-19.00.17

One of my favorite game elements of Chrono Trigger is actually the soundtrack. It was primarily done by Yasunori Mitsuda, who had some help with the legendary Final Fantasy composer, Nobuo Uematsu. The shear amount of tracks for the game was an amazing feat for the time frame. The music is otherworldly and consists of some amazing songs, one of which is my all-time favorite: Frog’s Theme. Seriously, whenever I do something cool, I start humming it. Yes, the song is THAT epic.

Chrono Trigger took some giant leaps forward for gaming. It helped push some of the gaming elements that we all love so much in modern RPGs, especially Western RPGs. The game will always hold a special place in my heart, and I am planning on making it the first game that my daughter and I play together. It is just THAT amazing.

_DSC4105_ok

No Gravatar

Virtual Reality (VR) has been hovering over the world of technology for awhile now with products like the HTC Vive, Oculus Rift, Samsung Gear VR, Sony PlayStation VR, and the Microsoft HoloLens. Opto adds to that list with a defining difference: it intends to be the first portable VR headset with integrated audio. It’s Kickstarter campaign has already been launched on March 31 with the goal of 40,000 GBP by April 29 for the first 500 devices.

_DSC4255_ok

Developed by industrial designer Tom Jarvis and software developer Richard Stephens, Opto is a portable VR headset where sound was a top priority during the start of its design. Speakers sit inside the headset so that users do not have to add their own headphones. It has a 40mm 32ohm speakers and a frequency of 20hz/20 khz.

Opto will support any smartphone with screen sizes between 4 and 5.1 inches. It will attach to the phone by way of a magnetic front cover that will allow the user to easily place the phone in and out of the device.

According to Opto’s blog, they are actually reworking the device to support larger phone screens as well as enlarging the acoustic chamber to 50mm.

It is made from the patented closed-cell foam material, XL Extralight, which should make it extremely lightweight and comfortable yet tough at the same time. This could make for an interesting angle for parents, considering that this technology is not only durable but is also easy to clean.

“It is especially suited to children as it’s made of lightweight foam and very impact resistant,” Co-founder Richard Stephens said. “We have tried it with children from about 9 upwards. We are also in partnership with WEARVR.com…They are also launching a new app for curated VR content for kids.”

This means that older children as well as adults could experience movies, games, and other content on the go in a full-immersion type of experience, though Stephens stresses that the device has not been tested on children younger than 9 (the American Academy of Pediatric recommends limited time for children on these types of devices anyhow).

The current set of VR devices as of right now are bulky and heavy. They also require wires as well as a set of headphones. The goal for Opto is to just carry a smartphone and the VR device instead of lugging around headphones as well.

“Opto is about making high-quality VR accessible for anyone who owns a smartphone. Our aim is to move VR from the gaming den into the living room, “ said Stephens.

New_Outfits_1461164222

No GravatarNew_Outfits_1461164222

 

 

Bethesda Softworks sent out the following

 

Fallout Shelter’s Update 1.5 is here to make your life as an Overseer easier!

 

With Update 1.5, you can now scrap your unwanted items and turn them into Junk to build even more gear. This is your chance to clear out the clutter in your Storage rooms and craft some cool new stuff.

 

We’ve also added new customization options to the Barbershop and new civilian outfits to craft or find in lunchboxes.  You’ll hardly even recognize your Dwellers when you’re done with them. You can even make them look like Ghouls!

 

Overseers using an iPhone 6s or 6s Plus can now take advantage of Fallout Shelter’s new 3D Touch support. With 3D Touch you can load directly into your vaults, skipping the main menu. You can also use 3D Touch to assign Dwellers to rooms and access storage just by tapping on any Storage Room.

 

Since its launch, Fallout Shelter has added a ton of new features – including new rooms, characters from Fallout 4, pets, new outfits, and weapons. In the last update (Update 1.4), crafting was added to the world of Fallout Shelter giving you the ability to make weapons, armor, and outfits. We also introduced the ability to collect Junk by sending your Dwellers into the Wasteland and from Lunchboxes because the better the Junk, the better items you can craft! There’s even more on the way, so stay tuned for upcoming updates.

 

Fallout Shelter was an instant smash hit when it launched on iOS on June 14, 2015, climbing to the top of the charts and beating Candy Crush to become the third-highest-grossing game on the App Store in its first week. Since launching on iOS and Android devices, Fallout Shelter has received top honors from some of the industry’s leading outlets, including winner of ‘App Store Best of 2015’, ‘Google Play Best of 2015’, and ‘Best Handheld/Mobile Game’ at the 2015 Golden Joystick Awards. Most recently, Fallout Shelter was named ‘Mobile Game of the Year’ at the 2016 D.I.C.E. Awards.

 

Fallout Shelter is available for free on the App Store or Google Play.

Fallout Shelter is an addictive and fan mobile game and I recommend checking it out if you have not yet done so. It is very much worth your time.

asdivine

No Gravatarasdivine

 

 

I love RPGs and especially JRPGS and there has been a lack of them on the Wii U ( even with the virtual console), so I was very happy to hear about this game from Kemco. Kemco previously developed Alphadia Genesis for Wii U which was localized by Natsume and was a decent , if generic JRPG that was good for those seeking any JRPG not on the virtual console.  But how does Asdivine Hearts hold up as a JRPG on Wii U? In a word: excellent.

Asdivine Hearts ( which is apparently part of a larger series) is a fantastic RPG that is a must have for any JRPG fan. Unlike Kemco’s other Wii U RPG Alphadia Genesis, battle transitions are handled much better with less flashing lights. Indeed, there are less flashing lights in general which made it much easier on my eyes. The combat system is also excellent in general, but before I talk about that I must mention the Jewel System.  In the game, you are given an item called a Rubix which can hold Jewels which can affect status, HP, MP and so on.  As you progress in the game, you can get bigger Rubixes and store more Jewels which can have more effects. The combat system uses the Jewels both in the form of void magic, light magic and shadow magic, and well as status jewels to create new effects in battle. There are limit breaks and team ups and it was much more fun than I anticipated.

The story is still rather generic but welcome at the same time. The characters are not well developed though and their development throughout the game is uneven.  My biggest complaint though is that there is some screen tearing on occasion and the audio skips quite a bit, especially if you had briefly suspended the game.

That said I still had a lot of fun playing this. I think I have put more hours into this game than any other in the last month. I really like this game and truly need to recommend this to all.

iphone

No Gravatar

Apple announced two new products this week, and while I was hoping for another version of the Apple Watch, we got the next best thing; two new Apple devices. Now the when the 6s details started coming to light, one of the things rumored was a smaller iPhone 6;  and when the iPhone 6s finally came out a smaller screen was nowhere to be seen. Just a few months later, many are happy with Apple’s announcement with iPhone 6 SE. The SE is something special that embodies qualities of both the iPhone  and 6s. 

The specs of the SE are definitely top notch for a phone this size, including almost all of the upgrades Apple made to the 6s, with the exception of 3D touch.

Some specs include:

  • Retina display
  • A9 chip with 64-bit architecture
  • 12-megapixel iSight camera
  • True Tone flash
  • 4K video recording at 30fps
  • Apple Pay

Starting price for the SE begins at $399 for the 16gb version to $499 for 64gbs. While you’re getting a great deal on what is pretty much a 6s at a cheaper price, 16gbs is pretty underwhelming when you consider how big apps,photos, videos and music is.

cosmic-star-heroine-ps-vita-ps4-limited-run-games

No Gravatarcosmic-star-heroine-ps-vita-ps4-limited-run-games

I had the chance to speak with the devs over at Zeboyd games and talk about their projects, past and present. Have a look below.

……………………………………….

JB: Zeboyd games is known for many quirky RPGs like Breath of Death VII and Cthulhu saves the world. What was the inspiration for these games?

ZG: I’ve been a big fan of RPGs ever since I was a kid so wanting to make RPGs myself was a natural desire. The mini-RPG in Retro Game Challenge was a big inspiration as I saw it and thought “I could totally make something like that!” whereas a big epic game would have been beyond me when I was just starting out. And both games were heavily inspired by my love of misunderstood heroes (someone who you think should be a villain actually having positive traits).

JB: Cthulhu saves the world was a well-known game on the Xbox Live Arcade store, what was the reception to the game there?

ZG:Actually, none of our games came out on the official Xbox Live Arcade store – they were all Xbox Live Indie Games (XBLIG). As such, even though they got great user ratings, the sales weren’t amazing. They did better than many games on the platform, but our company didn’t really take off until we ported them to PC and released them on Steam.

JB: How have you found Steam and mobile phone stores to be different to console markets in terms of reception and sales?

ZG: So far, it’s been Steam > XBLIG > mobile for us as far as success goes. Cosmic Star Heroine is the first time we’ll also be releasing a game on the PSN so we’re hoping it does well there.

JB: Cosmic Star Heroine, your upcoming game, looks to be one of the more innovative indie RPGs for PS4. What led to the game’s genesis?

ZG: Cosmic Star Heroine started out as a tribute to the sci-fi RPG series of the past like Phantasy Star & Cosmic Fantasy (hence the title). Phantasy Star in particular had this great mix of space opera, fantasy, and anime, that isn’t really being done these days. Of course, the more we worked on Cosmic Star Heroine, the more it started to diverge and develop its own identity, but those early influences can definitely be seen (especially Phantasy Star, but also other series like Lunar & Chrono Trigger).

JB: Cosmic Star Heroine looks to be very different from your previous games. With regards to the last question, what led to you making this game different from your previous games?

ZG: After making 4 games, we felt it was time to step up our game. We’ve spent substantially longer working on Cosmic Star Heroine (about 2.5 years now compared to around 3-12 months on our previous work) and we feel it’s really paid off in terms of making Cosmic Star Heroine drastically more polished than our past games. With this game, we’re really trying to make a game that wouldn’t feel out of place with the best RPGs of the past.

JB: You worked on the Penny Arcade games with the 3ed and 4th entries. What was that experience like?

ZG: Great! Penny Arcade gave us a lot of freedom as we were developing those games – more than I imagine most publishers would have. And working together with Penny Arcade – particularly Jerry Holkins (Tycho) and Jeff Kalles – was a lot of fun. I also really felt like we learned a lot from them that we’ve used since then in the creation of Cosmic Star Heroine.

JB: When the argument comes up over what counts as a JRPG where do you stand? Do you feel Cthulhu saves the world, Breath of Death VII and Cosmic Star Heroine count as JRPGs?

ZG: I’m firmly in the camp that believes that if you’re going to use the term JRPG, it should refer to certain tendencies of style and not merely indicate what region the game was developed in.

JB: What games influence you guys in creating your games? Is there any series in particular that you feel has a lot of influence on you?

ZG: Besides the aforementioned Retro Game Challenge that helped to kick off our whole development process, some of my favorite RPGs include Lunar: Eternal Blue, Breath of Fire: Dragon Quarter, and most of Atlus’ modern games (SMT: Nocturne, Persona 3 & 4, Etrian Odyssey series, Radiant Historia, Devil Survivor, etc.). I’m also a big fan of Diablo-style Action/RPGs like Path of Exile and Grim Dawn.

JB: Do you feel the market is healthy for games such as yours? Do you think it will be going forward?

ZG: I think the market is healthy as we’ve seen games like Stardew Valley and Undertale achieve great success recently. If we look at those two big successes, it’s easy to see a common path to success – a high quality and original take on an old classic that gamers miss these days.

JB: Do you see yourselves bringing your older games to newer consoles in the near future?

ZG: No plans for ports of older games at the moment. We might go back and do a sequel, prequel, or remake of one of our older titles, but merely porting one of them feels like it’d be more work than its worth, especially since they all run on a different engine than what we’re using right now with Cosmic Star Heroine (our older games were done with XNA, while Cosmic Star Heroine uses Unity).

JB: Do you have anything you would like to say to the readers of real otaku gamer?

ZG: Thanks for being patient with us as we finish up Cosmic Star Heroine! Hope you enjoy it!

 

You can follow Zeboyd Games on Twitter at @ZeboydGames. You can see the trailer for Cosmic Star Heroine Below

 

 

final two tribes

No Gravatarfinal two tribes

 

Two Tribes has announced via a press release that Rive will be their final game and they will stop developing games after its release. They note they are not closing and will support their partners but are ending game development.

See the full press release below

 

This is it! After more than 15 years of hard work and gallons of blood, sweat and tears, we have decided that RIVE will be Two Tribes’ final game. This may come as a surprise for you, but we’ve actually been thinking about it for some time now

For the last two years, we have been working feverishly to finish RIVE, the shooter/platformer hybrid that we always wanted to make. We have delayed it several times to make it the best experience possible and now that we are nearing the finish line, we can confidently say that RIVE will come out in September 2016!

We also want to make clear that Two Tribes will remain operational. We will continue to support our partners and all gamers out there, we just won’t be making any new games after RIVE.

So what happened?
The industry changed a lot since we started in 2000. Back then, there were maybe a dozen game developers here in The Netherlands. It was extremely difficult to enter the global games industry, as you needed to have a track record and experience. Even if you took a shot, you still had to secure backing from a publisher, since the only way to reach gamers was through physical distribution.

The technological bar was also set very high, as there were no middleware engines available. There were severe hardware limitations and most of today’s sophisticated design tools were non-existent. You basically had to make everything yourself. We felt comfortable working in such an environment, and we actually still cling to this DIY mentality.

The big change happened around 2008, when new technologies and tools allowed developers to make games way more easily and faster. Suddenly, because of digital distribution, small developers were able to create and publish their own games without the help of big publishers. Initially this was great for us, as we were one of the first developers to enter the Steam, WiiWare and iOS markets. Business was good. We were on the shortlists of companies like Nintendo and Valve.

But the situation didn’t last. While we were working on Toki Tori 2+ for two years, the industry was changing without us realizing it. The market was flooded with games by developers from all around the world. Game development schools were erected, and every year thousands of students tried their luck under increasingly difficult conditions. With game changers such as the Humble Bundle, the ever-continuing race to the bottom and a growing focus on free-to-play games, it became tough for a game to even hit the break-even point.

The industry had moved on and we were still stuck in the past. We learned this the hard way, when most of our employees needed to be laid off in 2013. But it would be too easy to solely blame the industry. Perhaps it would be better to blame it on dinosaurs!

Dinosaurs
As said, we’ve been working in the games industry since early 2000, making us dinosaurs, old farts, grandfathers or whatever you want to call us. This is great, because we’ve got a lot experience, but it also means that we act like a typical grandfather: slow and totally unaware of what is hot and what is not. Don’t get us wrong: we absolutely love making games, and we strongly feel that we’re good at making them. However, ask us anything about new industry developments, and often a big question mark will appear above our heads.

For example, we are used to working with our own proprietary engine. It’s technology that works great for us, but is by no means competitive with tools like Unity or the Unreal Engine. And then there are monetization strategies like free-to-play. We only know, and feel comfortable working with, the traditional model of full-priced games. The same goes for marketing: we know how to make a decent trailer and send out a press release… but have no clue how to get traction on YouTube and Twitch.

Wrapping up
Long story short (grandfathers like to digress!): when running a company, you need to be on top of your game, not just in terms of the product you’re making, but business-wise too. And we just aren’t on top of the games business anymore. Therefore, it makes sense to focus our attention elsewhere, perhaps even outside the games industry. We simply don’t know yet; but we do know that RIVE is going to be our parting gift to you and we’re making damn sure it’s going to be an awesome one!

Stay tuned for the release in September 2016!

 

Its very sad to hear that a company like Two Tribes will cease game development. What are your favorite games that they developed?

 

See the full statement here

Smart-Adventures

No GravatarLet me preface this by saying that I am not a fan of educational games. I was sent a code for this game to review and I decided to give it an honest play through before reviewing it. My thoughts have not changed much but I can respect what the developers were going for, even if its not intended for me.

Smart-Adventures

SMART Adventures Mission Math is an educational game designed to teach kids 9 and up about sciences and math, with a primary focus on inspiring young girls into going into the sciences. If you want a game designed for fun and action, boy are you in the wrong spot but if you have a young child and want them to play something educational, you could do a lot worse.

The game takes place on a space station that has been sabotaged. Playing a variety of math based games helps to repair the damage and track down who caused this. The minigames range in difficulty from easy to hard and they also branch into other science fields so as to help expand young childrens’ minds. Yes this game was made with young girls in mind, but young boys can enjoy and learn from this just as much.

I am not the intended market so I cannot truly be sure if this is particularly helpful for children of that age. I don’t have relatives or friends with kids of that age set ( all older or younger) so I could not show it to anyone for opinions. From what I saw…it seemed okay except maybe lacking something to keep young ones interested…or maybe that is my bias talking.

Like I said before though, if you want an educational game for a child 9 and up that will teach them about math and sciences, then you can do a lot worse than this. It is worth looking into to try and stimulate a child’s mind for the better.

By Jessica Brister On 22 Aug, 2015 At 05:43 PM | Categorized As Featured, Mobile Gaming, Portable/Mobile Gaming, Reviews | With 0 Comments
fallout-shelter-wallpaper

No Gravatar

If you were like me, you were delighted to hear at E3 that Bethesda Softworks had a free gaming app called Fallout Shelter. It sounded like a cool diversion before Fallout 4 came out. Then the Android users got a slap in the face: Fallout Shelter would only be immediately available for iOS. Yeah, as an Android user, I was a bit bitter. Yes, I know it’s a free app that Bethesda totally didn’t have to do, but I wanted to play it right then and there. It was a bit of a disappointment. However, the app is finally out for Android, and I have been playing it a lot. Apparently, so have a lot of other people. I wanted to love the game, but there is one major thing that I don’t like about it that have pretty much stopped me from playing it altogether.

Fallout Shelter is addicting, but it has one major downfall.

Fallout Shelter is addicting, but it has one major downfall.

Fallout Shelter is fun. Don’t get me wrong. It’s addicting. It’s clever. There is a lot right about it.

When I first started to play it, the game really reminded me of Sim Tower (anyone else remember that game?). The player is responsible as a vault’s Overseer to keep the place and people in order. You start off with a few dwellers and try to increase that number as well as manage resources and keep people happy. The three most important resources are power, food, and water which are harvested by placing certain rooms in the vault and having the dwellers work them. Of course, building rooms cost caps. To get more caps, a player must either level up the dwellers, successful rush a room (speed up the resource gathering process), send dwellers out to the wasteland, or complete objectives.

When objectives are achieved, they sometimes give out lunchboxes. These lunchboxes give out a few cards that award extra resources, outfits that raise dweller stats, special characters, weapons, or extra caps. At first, the objectives are easy, and players can easily get several lunchboxes. After awhile, though it gets harder and harder to get the goodies. Extra lunchboxes can be bought through in-app purchases.

Dwellers also have SPECIAL stats (just like in the actual Fallout games). Putting certain dwellers with certain stats will make material collection and successful room rushes easier. A player can increase a dweller’s stats by adding rooms that can train them. Players also need to keep an eye on the happiness level of the vault dwellers, since that can affect their performance. Happiness can be raised by rushing rooms or things like…making babies. Of course, besides worrying about the basic resources and happiness levels, there are also issues with radiation, rad-roaches, and raiders. Add a slick-looking color scheme and the retro 1950s Fallout-style, and you get a really awesome app.

Rushing a room unsuccessfully can be disastrous.

Rushing a room unsuccessfully can be disastrous.

It’s actually one of the best game apps I’ve played on Android. So you may be wondering to yourself, “If you think it’s a great app, why were you disappointed? Why did you stop playing it?” Well, there is one major thing that has forced me to stop playing altogether, and that is…

It’s so demanding that it’s ten times worse than a Tamigotchi. If you don’t know what that is, I’m sorry, but your childhood was not awesome.

Okay, I may be kidding on that one, but seriously, the game is demanding on a level that I haven’t experienced since I had this thing in Middle School:

Yes, I have saved this thing for the last (almost) twenty years.

Yes, I have saved this thing for the last (almost) twenty years.

The game cannot be minimized for too long because things will still keep going, even if you aren’t actively playing. I can understand that if it’s just running in the background, though that is still annoying. However, I have completely shut down the game and turned my tablet off, and when I get back on, the happiness level of my vault has dropped from the 90% range to the teens and most of my resources are gone. The game is unfortunately focused too much on real-time. It’s not an app that you can casually play. It demands a lot of attention, which is why I have dubbed the game “Tamagotchi on Steriods.” This means that if you want to be successful as an Overseer, don’t go to sleep and don’t stop playing.

I wish that the game would actually pause, but it’s too focused on real-time play. If Bethesda would fix this, it would be the best gaming app I’ve ever seen. However, unless they do, I just can’t play it anymore. It was taking over all of my time. That’s not something that I wanted in an app, something I I may play on occasion when I’m sitting at the doctor’s office or when I’m nursing my daughter. Let’s hope that we can actually pause Fallout 4. *Tee-Hee*

REAL OTAKU GAMER is using WP-Gravatar