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One of the best comics on the market is Usagi Yojimbo, the series by Stan Sakai about a rabbit ronin in feudal Japan named Miyamato Usagi. It is a truly amazing comic, and I did an earlier review of it, which I urge you to read here. But today, I will be talking about a spinoff of the series set in the far future and known as Space Usagi. Space Usagi is both a tribute to the fiction depicting samurai as well as scifi classics like Star Wars and Sakai tells the stories masterfully. Space Usagi was published as three miniseries, which were later all collected in one volume and later collected again with other spinoff work. It is very different from the main series but this allowed it to develop its own identity and go places the original comic could not.

Initially a story about protecting the heir to his clan, the story gradually expands into heist territory and also that of revenge. There are many similarities to the more recent Star Wars films, which is rather amusing since Space Usagi was published years before even The Phantom Menace came out, and yet did the concepts better. Sakai was clearly having a lot of fun with the project, possibly due to having a lot more freedom in terms of continuity. Yes characters appear who are counterparts to those of the original series but they are not exactly the same, and the changes are well done and help everyone stand out better. Sakai also went to some much darker places than in the main series, places I did not expect when I first read the comic. I would not say this is a darker and edgier version though, but once again, a comic in which Sakai was not restrained as much and thus free to explore more what if ideas.

There is still plenty of humor in the comics to counter the seriousness, and this has always been a strength of Sakai’s work. Balancing humor and dramatic writing is never easy but Sakai makes it look effortless. That being said, the comic also goes more in detail about what the fallout is like for the events Usagi goes through, especially when faced with loss and betrayal. There are some legitimately sad moments as much as there are humorous moments and I daresay this is some of Sakai’s best work. I know I haven’t touched on much of the plot but the fact is, I do not wish to spoil it because I want you all to read it yourself.

There was to be an animated series based on Space Usagi but the failure of Bucky O’Hare led to it being canned. That said, you can see a clip of it below.

This is a comic I recommend without hesitation, and I urge you to check it out. You can find it in the recently released Usagi Yojimbo Legends collection from Dark Horse Comics.

By Jonathan Balofsky On 21 Dec, 2017 At 01:40 PM | Categorized As Comics/Manga, News, PC Games, ROG News | With 0 Comments

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The Overwatch Universe grows again with this new comic!

According to legend, a dangerous Yeti roams the peaks above Nepal.

Who will be brave enough to hunt down this terrifying creature? Who will have the wits to outmaneuver its raw strength and power?

Find out in the latest Overwatch Comic, “Yeti Hunt.”

 

Read it here

By Jonathan Balofsky On 19 Dec, 2017 At 03:32 PM | Categorized As Comics/Manga, News, News, NINTENDO, ROG News | With 0 Comments

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ARMS will be getting a comic book adaptation in 2018! Starting FCBD 2018, there will be an ARMS comic from Ian Flynn from Dark Horse Comics. Flynn previously worked on the Archie Comics Sonic The Hedgehog series.

 

Dark Horse Comics is excited to feature all-ages stories from Nickelodeon’s The Legend of Korra and Nintendo’s ARMS for our Free Comic Book Day Silver offering on May 5, 2018!

First, Avatar Korra pairs up with an unlikely sidekick for a super-important, top-secret mission to track down a pack of lost pets in a story written by The Legend of Korra co-creator Michael Dante DiMartino with art by Jayd Aït-Kaci and Vivian Ng.

In a story based on Nintendo’s exclusive fighting game ARMS, a young fighter trains tirelessly to reach the top in the ARMS League Grand Prix—but first, he must defeat 599 other contenders! ARMS is written by Ian Flynn (Sonic the Hedgehog, Mega Man) with art by Joe Ng (Street Fighter, Overwatch: Binary).

 

This is exciting news. What other Nintendo series  do you hope will get comic book adaptations?

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By Jonathan Balofsky On 3 Dec, 2017 At 10:29 PM | Categorized As Comics/Manga, News, ROG News, Television | With 0 Comments

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Dark Horse Comics has new details about the upcoming Netflix adaptation of The Umbrella Academy, the comic from Gerard Way and Brazilian born artist Gabriel Ba. The comic, inspired by the Grant Morrison run on Doom Patrol, received critical acclaim and received the Eisner Award for best limited series. Dark Horse has now revealed more about the cast, and noted there would be more casting announcements later.

 

 

The Umbrella Academy will be produced by Universal Cable Productions. Steve Blackman (Fargo, Altered Carbon) will serve as executive producer and showrunner, with additional executive producers Bluegrass Television and Mike Richardson and Keith Goldberg from Dark Horse Entertainment. Gerard Way will serve as co-executive producer. The pilot script was adapted from the comic book series by Jeremy Slater (The Exorcist).

Tom Hopper (Luther)
“Luther” was groomed by his father from an early age to be the leader of The Umbrella Academy – a responsibility that has always weighed heavily on him. He is resilient, a workaholic, and possesses the ability of heightened physical strength. Upstanding to a fault, Luther always tries to do the right thing, even if that means putting others before himself.

About Tom Hopper
Hopper just wrapped shooting a starring role opposite Amy Schumer and Michelle Williams in Voltage/STX’s comedy I Feel Pretty, written and directed by Abby Kohn and Marc Silverstein. Most recently, he played “Dickon Tarly” in Season 7 of HBO’s explosive hit series Game Of Thrones. Hopper also starred as “Billy Bones” in Starz’s Black Sails, produced by Michael Bay, and has appeared in numerous other television series and film projects over his career including Netflix’s Kill Ratio, The History Channel’s event series Barbarians Rising, and the hit TV series Merlin for BBC1/Syfy Channel.

Emmy Raver-Lampman (Allison)
“Allison” is beautiful, elegant, and a formerly world-famous movie star who possesses the power of suggestion – anything she says aloud comes to pass. Her life seems perfect from the outside, but her ability has undermined every relationship she’s ever had. With her career on the decline and her marriage in shambles, she refuses to use her power as she seeks a more authentic life.

About Emmy Raver-Lampman
Emmy Raver-Lampman is the breakout star of the 1st National Touring Company of the Tony-winning phenomenon, Hamilton. After being a part of the original Ensemble on Broadway, Emmy was promoted to the coveted role of “Angelica Schuyler” for the West Coast run. Previous Broadway credits include Jekyll & Hyde, Hair and the National Touring Company of Wicked. The Umbrella Academy marks her very first television role.

David Castañeda (Diego)
“Diego” is a skilled, intense vigilante who has a real problem with authority. He isn’t as naturally strong or smart as his siblings, so he’s worked three times as hard for everything. Believing he should have been the leader of his family instead of his brother, he carries a massive chip on his shoulder that makes him hostile to just about everyone.

About David Castañeda
David Castañeda is currently shooting the Billy Crystal/Ben Schwartz comedy, We Are Unsatisfied. His recent work includes a lead role in the independent feature El Chicano, opposite Raul Castillo and George Lopez. He also stars alongside Benicio Del Torro and Josh Brolin in Lionsgate’s forthcoming Soldado, the sequel to the smash hit Sicario.

Aidan Gallagher (Number Five)
“Number Five” appears to be a thirteen year old boy, but in actuality he is a fifty-eight-year-old man trapped in the body of a child. He doesn’t suffer fools and is the smartest person in the room. He’s haunted by the things he’s seen and done, and is on the verge of losing his grip on reality.

About Aidan Gallagher
Aidan Gallagher starred as “Nicky” on Nickelodeon’s Emmy-winning series Nicky, Ricky, Dicky & Dawn, which just wrapped shooting a fourth season. For his performance, Aidan was nominated “Favorite Male TV Star” at the 2017 and 2016 Kids Choice Awards.

Robert Sheehan (Klaus)
“Klaus” is a drug addict and lovable mess of a human being and yet, if you ask him, any day now his life is going to turn around. He’s a classic “middle child” – a disarming pleaser who is seemingly everyone’s friend, but will rob you blind without thinking twice.

About Robert Sheehan Robert Sheehan (Misfits) next transforms into an East European, non-gender specific character in Mute on Netflix, the second part of a planned trilogy from writer/director Duncan Jones that began with Moon. Next year, Sheehan also stars opposite David Tennant in Dean Devlin’s thriller Bad Samaritan. In December, he’ll star in Christian Rivers’ Mortal Engines, a sci-fi/fantasy movie co-written and produced by Peter Jackson. For television, Sheehan is currently shooting the second season of Genius (National Geographic), which chronicles the life and work of Picasso

 

This author is excited for more details about the series due to being a big fan of the comics. We will be publishing a review of both Miniseries this week.

 

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By Jonathan Balofsky On 30 Nov, 2017 At 12:54 PM | Categorized As Comics/Manga, News, News, News, NINTENDO, PlayStation, ROG News | With 0 Comments

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My Hero Acadamia fans rejoice! Weekly Shonen Jump’s  has revealed that a new battle action game from Bandai Namco titled “My Hero Academia: One’s Justice” is coming out for PS4 and Switch.

The game will feature “stage destruction through attacks”, and a debut trailer for My Hero Academia: One’s Justice is set to appear at Jump Festa 2018.

We are eagerly anticipating more news on this game, but what about you all? Are you excited, will you be playing this? Let us know!

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No GravatarBandai Namco sent out the following

 

BANDAI NAMCO Entertainment, Inc., today announced Saint Seiya Cosmo Fantasy, a free-to-play action role-playing game (RPG) set in the mythological anime world created by renowned artist Masami Kurumada, is available now at the Apple App Store and Google Play.

Based on the popular anime that debuted in the mid-eighties, Saint Seiya Cosmo Fantasy lets fans experience the story straight from the original anime series. Players engage in fast-paced action RPG gameplay as they create a team of up to five from a roster that includes all of the Bronze Saints, Silver Saints, Golden Saints and even the Black Saints, voiced by the actors from the anime series. Players can even modify their Super Saints by using the character building feature, complete with super moves and special items to upgrade their characters. Saint Seiya Cosmo Fantasy draws old and new fans into the game with stunning presentation including fast action gameplay and flashy Ultimate Moves all controlled by intuitive tapping and swiping gestures.

 

“The Saint Seiya series has kept fans riveted for decades, and Saint Seiya Cosmo Fantasy is a title that lives up to that legacy with an engrossing story, rich graphical detail and the trademark style of the revered anime,” said Kensuke Sakai, the producer of BANDAI NAMCO Entertainment Inc. “Saint Seiya has finally come to mobile phones, and fans can now fit all of the conflicts in heaven and on earth into their pockets.”

 

To celebrate the game’s release, all players logging into the game will be able to get the character “Leo God Cloth Aiolia (?3).” Also, all users logging in to the game will receive 10,000 free Holy Stones which can be redeemed to draw randomized character cards (to perform a “Summon”) up to 10 times in a row. Fans should make sure to try your luck with these free Holy Stones at the Zodiac Fest featuring the Pegasus God Cloth Seiya!

This is an interesting release. Bandai Namco is certainly not skimping on adaptations of great anime. Will you be checking this out?

Source: Bandai Namco PR

By Nate VanLindt On 11 Nov, 2017 At 08:45 PM | Categorized As Comics/Manga, Editorials, Featured, News, Reviews | With 0 Comments

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Spoiler Alert!  If you haven’t read the December 1973 issue of Captain America And The Falcon (#168) yet, this article contains detailed information about the plot and storyline!  Don’t come complaining later if you ruined it for yourself!

Now, with that out of the way, let’s take a look at some comics!  Recently, I came across a good-sized lot of Captain America And The Falcon comics from the early to late Seventies.

Forty-two issues spanning a solid seven years of Captain America with a fair number of gaps of course.  Like a lot of kids, I grew up reading the occasional Cap story, but I never really collected it.  I picked up this run because a fair chunk of the later issues was the final run written and drawn by none other than Jack ‘The King” Kirby himself, almost twenty issues.  Most of the earlier issues were written by an assortment of writers including Stan Lee, Roy Thomas, Tony Isabella, and even Marv Wolfman.  Having never had access to this much Cap before, I figured I was in for a treat.  What I hadn’t expected was what a surprise I was in for as well.

I read a lot of Marvel Comics as a kid.  My favorite was Spider-Man.  Most of my comic collection as a child consisted of Marvel and DC from the Seventies and Eighties.  But I read those comics with a child’s eyes.  Coming back to them as an adult and reading them with an adult’s perspective shows a complex multi-layered dynamic between the characters that I’ve never realized existed before.  It’s something that isn’t in a lot of today’s modern comics; a subtext commentary about our society at the time the books were written.  It turns out Captain America And The Falcon was a book that was notably not afraid to address the issues of the day, namely racism and the inequity between blacks and whites in 1970s America.  There are comments and statements throughout the book, often between Cap and Falcon, about how African-Americans are treated in the USA.  It’s not just here or there either.  Stan Lee addresses it, Jack Kirby addresses it and bringing us to Captain America And The Falcon #168, Roy Thomas & Tony Isabella address it.

 

This issue of Captain America caught my attention, not just for the iconic cover, but also because it was a self-contained one issue story that was made into a Book And Record set which I happened to own as a child.  I’ve probably read the entire book at least fifty times, but having lost my Book and Record collection over the years, I’d almost forgotten that the story existed and had no idea that it was actually a regular issue that was released in the early Seventies as well.  So over twenty years later, I sat down to read it again.

The story starts out with Cap and Falcon out on patrol.  One of the first things you notice though is the tone of which Falcon speaks.  His dialect comes out in the writing and he sounds like he’s straight off the street in the Seventies.  This fits of course, but I never noticed it as a kid.  Captain America has a much more refined mode of speech but their banter back and forth flows naturally.   Things got surprisingly adult very quickly though, with Steve Rogers (and if you don’t know that’s who Captain America is…well, I can’t help you.  Or I just did, take your pick) worrying about the morality of having fallen in love with the daughter of the woman he used to be in love with in the 1940s.  And Falcon reassures him by telling him that it’s just ‘an old-fashioned [love] triangle’ that’s got him down.  Okay, so apparently that’s just par for the course for most people.  Who knew?

While I’m still reeling from the implications of that little bombshell, a mystery villain attacks Cap and Falcon out of the blue, spouting dire threats at Cap specifically.   Here’s where things get really interesting.  Falcon sneaks up on “The Phoenix” while he’s attacking Cap and kicks him in the back from behind.  Standard superhero stuff.  But then the Phoenix responds.

As you can see in the panel, Sam Wilson (that’s the Falcon for those of you who also didn’t know) refuses to sink to his level and makes with the witty banter in return, offering him a fair fight and the Phoenix responds again.  He then proceeds to pile drive Falcon in the chin with the butt of his um…laser rifle.  Yeah.  In 1973.  Hey, it’s a superhero comic!  But as you can imagine, the above exchange left me nearly open-mouthed.  Had I seriously read that dialogue properly?  Apparently, I had.  And make no mistake, this is a theme that is rife throughout the Captain America And The Falcon series.  It’s not unique to this issue.  However,  they did choose to make this particular issue into a Book and Record set for kids.  But don’t worry, the shocks don’t end here!

Cap then drives off Falcon to try and keep him safe and then goes hunting for the Phoenix on his own.  He finds a likely victim and ends up getting captured by the villain himself.  A chained Captain America asks him who he really is and why he holds such hatred for him and in true villain fashion, Phoenix gives Cap his life’s story.

He’s the son of Baron Zemo, a Nazi scientist who worked on weapons development for the Third Reich.  That’s right, Nazis.

But not just Nazis, Nazis and their families.  Zemo’s son portrays his father as a loving family man, working tirelessly for the benefit of the German war effort, until an attack by the despicable Captain America bonds his mask to his face and he becomes mad with anger and revenge and turns on his family, eventually meeting his doom.  Now his son is out, for blood, rising like a phoenix to wreak vengeance upon our not-so-hapless hero.  Phoenix loses in the end and loses his life too.  Falcon drops in to save the day, Phoenix spouts more racial epithets and Cap joins in to stop him, but his own weapons destroy him and Cap has an introspective moment about the nature of hatred.  Even this scene was emotionally charged and reminds us of our history.  

And as I read through more issues, the same types of themes reoccurred.  One of the Kirby issues (Captain America And The Falcon #194, February 1977) has Steve dreaming about an ancestor from the American Revolution and when he tells Sam Wilson, Falcon accuses Cap’s family of owning slaves, possibly even his own ancestors!   Isn’t that literally the exact thing that’s been in the news the last year or two?  It’s basically a conversation about white guilt, ignorance, and forgetting the past in less than 3 paragraphs!  Absolutely stunning.

Stop and think about all of this for a minute.  We have the child of a Nazi following in his father’s footsteps and coming to America to assassinate Captain America.  It does at least explain his brutally racist remarks to Falcon.  But take this book out of context for a moment.  Overlay it with the politics and mood or the country today.  It’s like we never got past that era.  We have the same racism.  We have neo-Nazis spreading across North America and Europe like a virus.  It’s FORTY-FOUR years after this comic was written and we still have the same issues for African-Americans in America as we did in 1973!  It’s right there in black and white for all of us to read in a comic primarily intended for children.

If anything, in many ways things have gotten worse instead of better, but we talk about the ‘rising racial tension in America’ like it’s shocking and new.  It’s not.  It never left.  It’s a social convention that’s been lurking about beneath the surface that we mostly avoided talking about except for the people directly suffering from it.  And it’s all wrapped up in a neat little red, white, and blue package for anyone to see in a comic written before I was even born.  Not in literature, nor in a journal article, or even an editorial.  In a superhero comic book.  THAT is how pervasive the endemic problems in our society are.  THAT is what we need to realize.  That every little thing shows us something is very wrong and we continue to ignore it, even in our kids’ comics.   Racism, white supremacy, the changing structure of relationships and learning to accept them, none of it is new. We’ve just forgotten it isn’t.  Maybe we need to look to the past and have some open discussions about these issues.  Perhaps we should put aside the politically charged arguments and the political correctness and simply look at our world…through the panels of a comic book.

A final note:

For those of you who are interested, Captain America And The Falcon is not remotely the only mainstream book that handles themes like these.  Marvel and DC in the 1970s both covered a variety of sociopolitical issues.  Notably, Black Panther, Luke Cage, Hero For Hire, and the Power Man And Iron Fist comics for Marvel and Green Lantern/Green Arrow for DC were heavy hitters.  Drugs, racism, poverty, and social inequity all get some serious contemplation between super-powered brawls.  If you get the chance, take a second look at some of those old comics.  You might just be surprised what’s inside them! 

 

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Dr. Strange and Dr. Doom are two iconic Marvel Comics characters. They have both been used in a variety of media from comics, to movies to games, but many don’t realize how much the characters have in common. They are both driven men, who strive to better themselves, albeit in different ways and for different reasons. Dr. Doom, despite being a man of science, is also a sorcerer like Dr. Strange and that is where  Dr. Strange & Dr. Doom: Triumph & Torment comes in.

A recurring part of Dr. Doom’s stories for a long time was his goal to free his mother from hell. Every midsummer’s eve he would fight a demon, lose and vow to fight again. In, Dr. Strange & Dr. Doom: Triumph & Torment a new approach is taken. After a test by the deities known as the Vishanti, Dr. Strange receives new affirmation of his role but also a new duty. Doom was also tested and nearly succeeded and Strange must grant him a boon, the boon being his aid in freeing Doom’s mother from hell. 

Dr. Strange & Dr. Doom: Triumph & Torment, is unlike any other Marvel comic. First released as a standalone graphic novel, when Marvel had its line of Prestige Graphic Novels, the title has recently been reprinted along with some other relevant stories to give more context ( and one not so relevant but there is a reason for its inclusion). It was written by Roger Stern and drawn by Mike Mignola, the creator of Hellboy, and as such has a truly unique look to it. The comic shows the lengths Dr. Doom will go to, to free his mother, and gives, even more, depth to the dictator of Latveria, including insight into his sense of pride and honor. But at the same time, it helps expand the mythos of Dr. Strange, both by showing him interacting with other sorcerers of all kind and through his work with Dr. Doom. It also expands on characters like the Aged Ghengis, a recurring character, and shows a very different side of him. It also shows just how connected Dr. Doom and Dr. Strange truly are. It even gives new insight into the demon Mephisto and his role in hell.

Triumph and Torment is a strong title for the comic, but it has multiple meanings, some of which is not clear until the end. It was a highly acclaimed work, but sadly unavailable for many years, until as stated, it was recently reprinted. If you are a fan of comics, you should read this. Even if you dislike superhero comics, this is worth your time as it doesn’t really come off as a superhero comic at all. It is far more philosophical and spiritual in nature, reflecting on the nature of humanity and destiny and redemption. And if you like art, you can see Mike Mignola’s earlier pre-Hellboy work here. It is of an amazing quality and really helps the otherworldly nature of the comic and its protagonists. Do yourself a favor and give this one a read.

By Zoe Howard On 23 Sep, 2017 At 10:24 PM | Categorized As Books, Comics/Manga, Featured, Reviews | With 0 Comments

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Unit 44 is the story of two Area 51 agents who work out of the base in Nevada. The book follows Agents Hatch and Gibson as they discover Gibson has neglected to pay for Unit 44. The storage unit contains Area 51 secret technology and a few other items that they had no space to store on the base. The unit was sold at auction due to lack of payment to two men who run a second-hand shop. What was at stake? After a yelling from their superior, they embark on their mission to reclaim what they have lost. The truth behind Roswell, New Mexico infamous alien crash.

From the get-go, we discover that the agents are not your average serious agents. One could essentially call them the Rocksteady and Bebop of federal agents. Their intelligence is very low and they spend a lot of time bickering between each other. The whole book feels much as you would expect, a mismatched buddy comedy with a Sci-Fi twist. We never really learn a lot about either Hatch or Gibson other than a few home life jokes. They are serviceable as protagonists but they serve no main development arch of any kind. They are no different at the end than they are at the beginning.

I want to take a moment and talk about the beginning. Considering this book is only 106 pages (94 actual story pages) they shove a lot of story into it, so much that they never give any time to the characters. You are given no introduction other than that these two are the people at the beginning of the book. They just show up and within a few panels of dialog, we are off on our kooky adventure. To say this feels rushed is an understatement. When I went back over the book to clear up some stuff there was a moment I missed on the first page because I was thrown into everything so fast I tossed it aside. Typically I would shrug such a thing off but it comes into play later with a big reveal that meant nothing to me because I was trying to acclimate myself to the world and characters.

This is probably one of the biggest faults of the writing. The main characters have zero development. Reflection upon finishing the book made me realize the only character who had somewhat of a story arch was the human antagonist. That might be why the ending payoff works as well as it does for them, but it also means the end of the book just means ok done for Hatch and Gibson. If this was a later book in a series I could let this pass, but seeing as it is our introduction to the universe it leaves me asking the question of why? Because the author says so? That is not a solid reason to keep reading.

There are some fun characters to be had in the story. The main alien itself was one of the unique characters as far as the writing goes. The character Lindsey is also one of the more entertaining even if her motives and reasons for doing things are never clear. There are also some genuinely funny moments in the book. I can remember at least a dozen that actually had me laughing out loud at something that happened. It was moments like that that made the bad jokes even worse. For almost every good joke there was an equally horrible joke or reference that just made me groan. Most of the bad ones came from really poor uses of pop culture references; The worst being a Sir Mix-A-Lot reference.

So I haven’t spent any time at all discussing the art of the book yet. There is actually a reason for this. I prefer saving the best for last. Unit 44 excels with its art. It even held up a lot of the characters when the writing fell flat. Most everyone in the book sounds like they have the same voice. There was very little difference between the characters dialog. (BTW I live in Nevada. Even the cowboys here don’t speak with southern accents. ) It was often the expressions and looks of the characters themselves that give the attitudes and personality that the dialog often lacked.

The style itself felt like a mix of many 90s era cartoons. Most notably for me was a heavy influence from the Men in Black cartoon series as well as the Clerks cartoon. There is also a heavy inclusion of anime style where emotional characterization is used with many over the top expressions that really do a great job blending into the often more subdued drawings.

The coloring is also a great style for this book. They rarely use any bright colors. Sticking to more muted pallets gives the book a very classic feel. The few uses of bright color they do use are often for either dramatic effect or when using some form of technology. There were a few moments where it didn’t quite feel like an action was conveyed or a scene jumped abruptly, but this was few and far between.

If I were to comment on a flaw in the art it would have to be what I could only assume was the rewards from the Kickstarter. There are a few characters in the book who have way more detail and look more realistic than the rest of the cartoonishly-styled characters. When I first read the book I had no clue it was Kickstarted. I went to the Kickstarter page and discovered some of the backers did have the option for characterization in the book. I just don’t know why they make them look so drastically different from the everyone else. As someone who had no clue about the Kickstarter, the characters just came across as gratuitous and out of place.

Overall I found myself with mixed feelings about Unit 44. The dialog (mostly the rapid jokes) was often a grind to get through but I still found myself compelled to read on. There is a spark of originality to the book that made me interested in where the adventure was going. Despite the lack of real information about the characters, I could see getting into this world and its people through a series. It would be fun to see how the writing develops. If you are looking for a more well-rounded character story then you might be in for a little letdown. If you are looking for a quick read with some laughs, then I would say give it a go.

Review copy of the book provided by the publisher.

By Stark Wyvern On 22 Sep, 2017 At 02:16 AM | Categorized As Comics/Manga, Reviews | With 0 Comments

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Legion of Collectors is back with another box. This time the box is based on the amazing animated classic Batman the Animated Series.

This box, of course, comes with the classic Joker patch and a classic Catwoman pin. As usual, both patch and pin are quite well done.

Inside the box is also an awesome Funkofied t-shirt. This one is based on the classic logo for the series. A nice black shirt with a solid logo makes for a shirt that any fan would enjoy.

There is also a Funkofied comic. Which portrays Batman on the roof.

The Exclusive Funko is Mr.Freeze. A really well made Funko that shows off the greatness of this version. It is always cool to see what character gets Funkofied exclusively for the boxes.

Lastly is a Batmobile and Batman Dorbz. The Batmobile is really well made. It looks just like a small version of the shows ride. The Dorbz is a standard issue but still a nice addition.

All in all a great box. It really is such a treat to see what they pack into these amazing boxes. Cannot wait for September’s DC’s Most Wanted Box!