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This past December, I was given a copy of The Elder Scrolls Online, and immediately went and got the Morrowind expansion as well. Playing the MMO, especially the Morrowind expansion, made me think back to when I first played Morrowind. This was a year or so after the game came out, and while I liked it then, I hadn’t played it since 2005. I was worried the game didn’t hold up well, after Oblivion and Skyrim advanced the series, and attempting to look back on the game years later made me reluctant to try playing again. After playing the Morrowind expansion for ESO however, I felt now was as good a time as any.

Before I started playing again, I decided I wanted this to be a pure retrospective run. I had no mods whatsoever installed, meaning whatever bugs were in the game ended up staying put. Upon loading up and starting to play, I was instantly taken back to my youth and playing the story of a newcomer to the strange land of Morrowind once again. But what shocked me about the game, was how much my fear was misplaced. Yes the game had aged, and the visuals didn’t look so great anymore, but they were not as bad as I had feared. Yes the game lacked many features that would be a big part of later games, but I didn’t mind. I just wanted to keep playing and rediscovering things.

Nostalgia is a powerful influence on our memories and I had been worried constantly that looking past a nostalgia filter would show how bad the game truly was, but I feel the inverse happened. I had built it up in my mind so much that the game didn’t age well, that when I finally played again, it was an excellent experience still. Granted there was a learning curve as I had to remember how to do certain things, as well as how to unlearn other things. My muscle memory from Oblivion and Skyrim tended to get in the way for a while, as the games are very different, but this also made me appreciate how unique Morrowind really is as a game. It is considered the breakout title in the series (although I personally still feel Daggerfall is the more important title), and there is a reason Skyrim was designed to harken back to Morrowind more than to Oblivion.

Playing again and exploring the Island of VVardenfell, I cam to appreciate how far the series had come and also the unique nature of the series. The Elder Scrolls is a series that can reinvent itself every time in order to give a new experience. While many games can claim this, it is not the same since The Elder Scrolls universe doesn’t just grow and adapt with new entries but completely reimagines possibilities. Going from a  traditional western fantasy, to a truly bizarre fantasy land, back to a European fantasy land, then to a northern European inspired land with its own twists and turns, The Elder Scrolls shows there is nothing off limits to the dream.

I urge you all to look back on this series again, and if you fear it has aged too pearly, you might be surprised. I even sort of want some of the unvoiced NPCs to be a thing again in future installments in some way, just so the world can feel more lived in and there can be more personal interactions. if anything I learned from this experience, that you can end up fearing nostalgia to the point of hurting your own memories of something. Based on this, I will be taking a look again at other games I haven’t touched in years. I want to see what else still feels good, and I look forward to doing so. Perhaps next though, I will take a look again at Arena, another game I felt didn’t age too well. I hope you will join me then.

 

 

Disclaimer: The above was the opinion and experience of the author and not necessarily that of Real Otaku Gamer or its staff.

By Jonathan Balofsky On 16 Jan, 2018 At 05:17 PM | Categorized As Editorials, Featured, Opinion, Television | With 0 Comments

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Ah Star Trek, the wagon train to the stars that has endured since the 60’s. It is a series that brought many firsts for television and movies and broke barriers. However, a realization occurred to me while re-watching episodes recently. That realization is that above everything else, Star Trek is a rejection of everything Lovecraft wrote and believed in.

It is difficult for many to understand now, just how H.P. Lovecraft was. While the racism in his work is still apparent, many don’t realize just how it fuelled his work along with his fears and paranoia’s.  Lovecraft’s work was deeply personal and from a dark place. The monstrous half human hybrids for example, were inspired by his fears of miscegenation, and his great old ones and cosmology in general were inspired by his fear of the unknown. Lovecraft came from an old New England family and was horrified by the changing culture, especially his brief time in New York  when he interacted more with other ethnic groups. His own family problems left him with many psychological issues, such as a fear of intimacy and openness.

But what does this have to do with Star Trek? Very simply, Star Trek rejects each and every aspect of Lovecraft’s work. Racism is attacked, black women are shown in positions of power, and interracial relationships are shown. Different cultures working together is shown as a good thing and even Spock can be seen as another rejection of the monsters of Lovecraft’s work, given that he is half human and half alien. But it is the opening of Star Trek that truly shows the power of idealism vs giving into fear.

Space: the final frontier. These are the voyages of the starship Enterprise. Its five-year mission: to explore strange new worlds, to seek out new life and new civilizations, to boldly go where no man has gone before.

Star Trek is about rising above fear and hate and daring to explore. There is no fear of the unknown but instead a desire to learn more and see what has not been seen. Yes there are dark moments, such as in Deep Space Nine, but with one or two exceptions, the victories achieved are done by rising up above hatred, fear and paranoia. The entities that are above human comprehension are seen differently as well. In the episode ” The Squire of Gothos”, such an entity is shown to be a child ultimately, and then there is Q. Q is an omnipotent entity, yet the Enterprise crew is able to best him more than once, and even learn from him.

There are times that the unknown truly is terrifying, but these are not the norm ( and ultimately that makes these instances stand out better). The message of the show is ultimately a simple one, but one that needs to be heard time and again. If we work together we can grow as people and fear is something that can be overcome. Humanity has potential, and we must work to use it to its fullest and best.

 

 

Disclaimer: The above was the opinion of the author and not necessarily that of Real Otaku gamer or its staff.

By Jessica Brister On 10 Jan, 2018 At 11:15 AM | Categorized As Best Game Ever, Editorials, Featured, PC Games, PlayStation | With 0 Comments

No GravatarSince I have a lot of hobbies and loves, it’s not uncommon for me to listen to music while playing a game (as I’m sure many gamers do).  One odd aspect of my gaming career is that I inadvertently made “soundtracks” to games that do not play more modern music (i.e. the GTA franchise is out because it already has a soundtrack).  I stuck to this so much that when I think of a game, I automatically think of the soundtrack I made.  Or, if a song is playing from that soundtrack, I immediately am transported back to that game and possibly even that level that I assigned the song to.  This might sound awesome to some people, or it might sound incredibly geeky to others.  I find that I love to flash back to the nostalgia of a game when hearing a particular song; I may not have thought of said game otherwise.  Add some years  to when I first started doing this, and I’m enthralled with what I had initially did: it’s helped me remember aspects of some games that I know that I will never return to.

Enter: Tomb Raider II

It’s one of my favorite all-time games, and it’s definitely the best puzzle-based adventure game I’ve ever played.  I just completely fell in love with it, even though I such at puzzle games and had to buy a walk-through (yes, I said buy; the walk-throughs on the Internet weren’t great).  It looks dated now with Lara Croft’s squarish appearance, so I’m glad I can think back to days when it looked so “real” in comparison to what games came before it.

Tomb Raider II came out in late 1997.  However, I compiled my soundtrack sometime in 2000 on my second play-through, so if there are any songs that are newer than the game, that’s why.  I felt the need to share this list with everyone, if not for the fact that I don’t want it to die in my memory, so enjoy…

Level 1: Great Wall

Song: Creed – Torn (from My Own Prison, 1997)

 

It was the album before Creed turned obnoxious: My Own Prison had some dark vibes, and the song Torn really delivered.  It’s also one of those songs that feels like it starts things off, so it was perfect for the first level, Great Wall.  Lara ran around the ruins of the Great Wall of China, and the level gave an intro for things to come.

Level 2: Venice

Song: Stone Temple Pilots – Sex Type Thing (Core, 1992)

 

I chose this STP song mostly based on the fact that I was listening through Core at the time and also because of the pacing of the song.  If you put Lara at her natural “run,” she runs to the beat of the song.  For whatever reason, this song “took on” the feel of the level.  The actual content of the song itself didn’t necessarily matter, so the song really isn’t some sexual objectification of Lara for me.

Level 3: Bartolli’s Hideout

Song: Stone Temple Pilots – Wicked Garden (Core, 1992)

Another STP song that actually is right after the above fore-mentioned song on the album, Core.  It ended up being a natural transition from one level to the other, even though I took me approximately forty minutes for each level (yes, I put the songs on repeat).  This is also one of the songs where if I hear it, I immediately go back to that level.  Every.  Single.  Time.

 

Level 4: Opera House

Song: Days of the New – The Down Town (Days of the New, 1997)

Days of the New made all acoustic cool again in the late ’90s.  The Down Town might still be one of my favorites from them.  In this case, it emphasized the cool location of Lara’s exploration of a run-down opera house, while highlighting how dilapidated and grungy the place ended up being.  The song also really feels cool listening to while Lara is running.

 

Level 5: Offshore Rig

Weezer – My Name is Jonas (Weezer, 1994)

This level in particular made me stick to the song, My Name is Jonas, even if I used the rest of the album for other levels.  I thought it was cute because of how the lyrics describe, “The workers are coming home,” and the level is on an offshore rig.  It might be a stretch, but this is another song where I can’t not think of this album when the song plays.

 

Level 6: Diving Area

Weezer – Pretty much the rest of the Blue Album (Weezer, 1994)

I ended up listening to the rest of what Weezer fans say is “The Blue Album,” noting the blue background of Weezer’s self-titled album from 1994.  I flash back to this level any time most of the album is on, and I love it!

 

Level 7: 40 Fathoms

Jars of Clay – Flood (Jars of Clay, 1995)

When you’re playing a level where you have to fight for every breath, I thought Jars of Clay’s Flood was perfect.  This is probably the band’s more famous song.

 

Level 8: Wreck of the Maria Doria

Pantera – Floods (The Great Southern Trendkill, 1995)

One of Pantera’s most haunting and beautifully written songs, Floods seems to just fit with a level where Lara is trapped in a upside-down shipwreck, using pockets of area to survive.

 

Level 9: Living Quarters

Machine Head – Message in a Bottle (The Burning Red, 1999)

Living Quarters explores the passenger side of the Maria Doria, and it’s a bit of a head trip, since this part of the ship settled upside down.  Machine Head’s cover of The Police’s Message in a Bottle continues with my nautical-themed, darker toned set of songs.

 

Level 10: The Deck

Alice in Chains – Grind (Alice in Chains, 1995)

The Deck is an expansive level that highlights part of the deck of the Maria Doria, which had crashed through a huge cavern.  I thought the song “Grind” was appropriate as this level is a bit of a grind.

 

Level 11: Tibetan Foothills

Static X – So Real (Wisconsin Death Trip, 1999)

Tibetan Foothills is probably my favorite level for TR II because of the fun puzzles and the snowmobile action.  The pulsing beat of Static X’s So Real fits perfectly with some cool snowmobiling across the icy mountains.

 

Level 12: Barkhang Monastery

Jars of Clay – Liquid (Jars of Clay, 1995)

Nothing echoes the feeling of exploring a huge monastery like the haunting notes of Jars of Clay’s Liquid.  This is also a favorite level, and you get some much-needed help from the monks as long as you don’t attack them.

 

Level 13: Catacombs of the Talion

Metallica – Call of Ktulu (Ride the Lightning, 1984)

Catacombs of Talion is an icy and particularly tricky level that is perfect with Metallica’s Call of Ktulu.  Because of this pairing, I love to drive in snow storms with this song on.  It brings me back to TR II.

 

Level 14: Ice Palace

Metallica – One (…And Justice For All, 1988)

Ice Palace is the last of the cold climate levels, and it definitely delivers.  It has some crazy puzzles and some tough baddies, which is why I selected Metallica’s One for this level.

Level 15: Temple of Xian

Metallica – Wherever I May Roam (Metallica, 1991)

Temple of Xian is probably the largest level for TR II, and if it’s not, it certainly feels that way.  The place is massive and has some crazy puzzles.  Metallica’s Wherever I May Roam felt perfect for the level.

 

Level 16: Floating Islands

Metallica – Orion (Instrumental) (Master of Puppets, 1986)

The Floating Islands level is a bit of a trip to play; the whole thing is quire surreal.  Because of this, I wanted a song that matched that quality, and I thought Metallica’s Orion (Instrumental), especially the beginning, really fit the level.

 

Level 17: The Dragon’s Lair

Alice in Chains – Again (Alice in Chains, 1995)

There’s nothing quite like a boss level with the completely rock-on song of Alice in Chain’s Again.

 

Level 18: Home Sweet Home

It’s such a short level that no song is necessary.

And for when you’re in post-Tomb Raider II blues after the game is completed, finish it off with:

Alice in Chains – Over Now (Alice in Chains, 1995)

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Sports games are a major part of the gaming industry. Games like FIFA, Madden, NHL from EA and NBA games from 2K are some of the best selling games all year. This is also an area that Nintendo has suffered in in recent years. The lack of sports games on the Wii U were a major factor in the system’s downfall, and even with NBA 2K18 selling well on Nintendo Switch there is more Nintendo can do for Switch. In fact, they have the perfect means of getting sports games on the system: making their own.

Mario sports games are often extremely fun, such as Mario Golf and Mario Tennis but few were better than Mario Strikers. This soccer/football game was one of the most energetic and fun Mario sports games of all, being so different and vibrant compared to other Nintendo made sports games. It had intense arcade like action, somewhat reminiscent of a SNK arcade sports title. It had more character so to speak, for a Mario game and truly felt separate from anything else Mario. This was thanks to o the excellent work by Next Level Games, and they even even managed to up the ante in the sequel with a beefier game and more options.

However, this is where things begin to go into unfulfilled potential area. There was no third game on the Wii U, and such a game was sorely missed. There is now a chance to return to the series on the Switch and this can only help Nintendo. As I stated, sports games are huge sellers in the industry and often help move systems. While the Switch obviously is selling extremely well,  often topping sales charts in the past months, there is still more that can be done. A game like Mario Strikers can also stand out in multiple ways. For example, it would not need yearly updates and can be a single title that can be supported with DLC and offer far more value until a sequel is made that actually feels like a full sequel. It can also remain cartoonish but still athletic and stick out that way.

Lastly, Nintendo is still having trouble breaking into some markets and a Mario Strikers game can help. Soccer/Football is the most popular sport in the world and with a proper online mode with multiple play options, this can be the game that truly cements Nintendo in those areas. With the world cup coming up, now is the perfect time to announce a new game in the series!

Disclaimer: The above is the opinion of the author and not necessarily that of Real Otaku gamer or its staff.

 

 

By Jonathan Balofsky On 3 Jan, 2018 At 09:29 PM | Categorized As Editorials, Featured, Old School Otaku, Opinion, ROG News, Television | With 1 Comment

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25 years ago, the world of science fiction changed forever. Star Trek was already an established franchise, with Star trek The Next Generation having become a juggernaut in its own right. But January 3 1993 saw the premiere of Star Trek Deep Space Nine, a series that truly helped move the franchise forward. I have so many fond memories of this series, and I do not hesitate at all to call it my favourite of the Trek franchise. I will do my best not to give spoilers so people can experience this for the first time themselves, but I will in some instances.

DS9 stands out above the other Star Trek series by doing something that had not been done before, and that is developing long running character and story arcs. This was possible thanks to the series being set on a space station instead of a ship travelling to different locations, and the recurring elements this enabled ended up creating some of the best storylines.  There is so many great storylines that can be mentioned such as the Dominion War and the rebuilding of Bajor, but for many the best storylines were the ones that delved into showing both character growth and the darker side of Star Trek.

Ferengi culture was explored far beyond what was done on TNG, and so were the Klingons and the Cardassians. This was done thanks to great characters who showed off the different parts of the cultures. The Ferengi gave us Quark, the traditionalist Ferengi, his “failure” brother Rom, who was actually a genius engineer, and Rom’s son Nog who joined Starfleet. The Klingons of course gave us Worf once again, but also Martok. Martok was a traditional Klingon, and one who showed off the best aspects of the culture in contrast to Gowron, who showed the negatives. And the Cardassians? We received two of the most iconic non main cast members in all of Star Trek: Gul Dukat and Elim Garak.

The main cast went through many changes in terms of personality and growth. They were not the same characters at the beginning that they became at the end and the best example was Captain Sisko himself. When he came to the station as Commander Sisko, he was a reluctant appointee and had a lot of hostility in him due to the death of his wife during the Battle of Wolf 359 with the Borg. However, he grew into his many roles and became perhaps the greatest of the captains. Sisko was willing to do things no one else would and realized that if it got the results he needed, then he could live with himself. The infamous episode “In the Pale Moonlight” is often considered either the best or the worst episode in all of Star Trek, due to this.

The aforementioned Dominion War story arc that took up the later seasons also proved to be a triumph of storytelling. There were episodes that truly showed war to be hellish and the consequences to be long lasting, and this mention of darker content wouldn’t do well without mentioning the fact that the series also took a darker look at the Federation. For the first time, we got to see that some consider the Federation to be just as bad as some of the people they fight, albeit these comments tended to come from those who had betrayed the federations.

Characters like Doctorm Bashir, Odo, Chief O’Brien, Major Kira and more showed that this was a series willing to tackle deeper subject matter. Odo faces discrimination t times due to his species and Kira is a former terrorist ( this definitely would have been different if made post 9/11). the infamous O’Brien must suffer episodes are some of the most well known, and Doctor Bashir was forced into situations he wouldn’t have anticipated.

The show was not without humor though and the lighter episodes were extremely welcome. These often involved the Ferengi and did a great job, as a I said before, of expanding them as a people. If I can sum up Deep Space Nine in one word, it would be “growth”. This was a series where the characters grew, but so did Star Trek as a franchise. So Happy 25th anniversary Deep Space Nine, you were amazing!

By Jonathan Balofsky On 31 Dec, 2017 At 08:27 PM | Categorized As Editorials, Featured, News, NINTENDO, Nintendo Switch, Reviews, Reviews, ROG News | With 0 Comments

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Gauntlet is one of those absolute classic videogames. The kind that have inspired generations of gamers and led to many more games bearing its influence. From games like Diablo to God of War, many action games take their direction from Gauntlet and that tradition continues in Hammerwatch.

Hammerwatch starts out by having you select your class from the various choices, each with their own pros and cons. Choosing the character that best fits your playstyle is the key to succeeding, for example, I will always choose a melee character as that is the playstyle I developed while playing these types of game. Hammerwatch makes the choices feel right almost immediately, and gives you the chance to truly understand how to play.

I have to say, that I truly appreciate this kind of game being on Switch, even if this is not the best version of the game. The framerate is not as good as on other platforms, but that is an acceptable compromise. What is more annoying is having the enemies not being fully visible sometimes while playing. These hack’n’slash games require you to see the enemies so you can progress, but when they blend in with the background too much, that creates a major issue.

However, I am pleased to say that this was the only real issue I had with the game. It played just like the evolution of Gauntlet that I have wanted, and I daresay it is more true to the arcade original, than some recent Gauntlet games. The expansions on the concepts, and new paths to pursue are a welcome idea, and interacting more does help expand the immersion. Plus this game is excellent to play with friends, as it is one of the best co-op games on the system. I say that because this is a game that truly recaptures that classic feel from the golden age of gaming when you are at the arcade with friends, and I do not feel that is done often.

Hammerwatch is a game that just makes me want to keep coming back. It is an indie game that surpasses its inspiration and takes it to heights never done before. Despite the issue I had with enemy visibility, I do feel that Hammerwatch is an amazing game. There are multiple modes to play in the game, and you will even want to try the other classes. This isn’t even mentioning, that there is more planned by the developers. If you have a Switch, then check out Hammerwatch. You will be in for a great time, either by yourself or with your friends. This is gaming at its purest!

 

Disclaimer: A review code was provided

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Nintendo has always tried something new and innovative with their games, for better or worse. One major attempt at trying something new was the Satellaview add-on. Thus was a way to bring new games through satellite broadcasts, and brought new versions of several games like The Legend of Zelda and F- Zero. The intention was that these could only be played during the broadcast time , and afterwards they were gone for good. These were only available in Japan and not released anywhere else.

Now fast forward several years and fans outside Japan have learned of these games and developed an interest in them. The most well known Satellaview games are the Zelda games, which are remakes of the first game and A Link to the Past, complete with new content and stories. The latter, known as the Ancient Stone Tablets, has been restored and fan translated, allowing new players to try them.

Zelda wasn’t the only series to get this treatment however, as there was also a Satellaview version of Excitebike  which had a lot of new content. There was a major change to in this version where the racers were replaced by Mario characters, and also included a “SUPER” mode where the player has unlimited turbo, as well as the addition of coins. The coins are spread out on the courses and increase top speed, very similar to the Mario Kart series. Yes there was a Mario Kart-like Excitbike well before Mario Kart 8.

Other games for the Satellaview were F-zero sequels that had new tracks and vehicles. More importantly however, they included a track editor if you were bored of what was offered already. It was way ahead of its time and yet the game can only be found via rom dumps. Then there are the Mario Paint games, Super Mario Bros, Wario’s Woods, Wizardry, Super E.D.F., Kirby, Harvest Moon and Square Enix RPGs on the service. All of these games had something new to them and yet players outside Japan never got to experience them. These include games like Dragon Quest 1, which actually got a SNES remake this way in Japan. This disappointing that the were not ever brought to the west but this got me thinking, that ff the games’ source codes still exist, should Nintendo and the other publishers/developers bring them back now?

Obviously for some games this would require localization and may not be worth it, such as for the minor games. For a series like Zelda on the other hand, there would definitely be a market. The Chrono Trigger games brought to Satellaview would definitely be big sellers for Square Enix, along with the Dragon Quest remake. The games like the F-Zero sequels and Excitebike. have some great new content that players outside Japan would love to play. If these games could be brought over to the Nintendo Switch eShop when the online service for classic games launches, they would be some of the top selling games. VS Excitebike and The Mysterious Mursame Castle prove there is a market for the games by being big sellers when they were brought to the Wii U and 3DS eshops respectively,

I truly hope Nintendo does consider this, as not only would gamers in the west be thrilled to finally play these games, but it would also open up new fandoms and generate new sales. It might be labour intensive, but it is a risk worth taking.

 

Disclaimer: The above was the opinion of the author and does not necessarily reflect that of Real Otaku Gamer or its staff.

 

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One of the best comics on the market is Usagi Yojimbo, the series by Stan Sakai about a rabbit ronin in feudal Japan named Miyamato Usagi. It is a truly amazing comic, and I did an earlier review of it, which I urge you to read here. But today, I will be talking about a spinoff of the series set in the far future and known as Space Usagi. Space Usagi is both a tribute to the fiction depicting samurai as well as scifi classics like Star Wars and Sakai tells the stories masterfully. Space Usagi was published as three miniseries, which were later all collected in one volume and later collected again with other spinoff work. It is very different from the main series but this allowed it to develop its own identity and go places the original comic could not.

Initially a story about protecting the heir to his clan, the story gradually expands into heist territory and also that of revenge. There are many similarities to the more recent Star Wars films, which is rather amusing since Space Usagi was published years before even The Phantom Menace came out, and yet did the concepts better. Sakai was clearly having a lot of fun with the project, possibly due to having a lot more freedom in terms of continuity. Yes characters appear who are counterparts to those of the original series but they are not exactly the same, and the changes are well done and help everyone stand out better. Sakai also went to some much darker places than in the main series, places I did not expect when I first read the comic. I would not say this is a darker and edgier version though, but once again, a comic in which Sakai was not restrained as much and thus free to explore more what if ideas.

There is still plenty of humor in the comics to counter the seriousness, and this has always been a strength of Sakai’s work. Balancing humor and dramatic writing is never easy but Sakai makes it look effortless. That being said, the comic also goes more in detail about what the fallout is like for the events Usagi goes through, especially when faced with loss and betrayal. There are some legitimately sad moments as much as there are humorous moments and I daresay this is some of Sakai’s best work. I know I haven’t touched on much of the plot but the fact is, I do not wish to spoil it because I want you all to read it yourself.

There was to be an animated series based on Space Usagi but the failure of Bucky O’Hare led to it being canned. That said, you can see a clip of it below.

This is a comic I recommend without hesitation, and I urge you to check it out. You can find it in the recently released Usagi Yojimbo Legends collection from Dark Horse Comics.

By Jonathan Balofsky On 26 Dec, 2017 At 10:19 AM | Categorized As Editorials, Featured, News, NINTENDO, Nintendo Switch, Opinion, Reviews, ROG News | With 0 Comments

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The Nintendo Switch has been a major success this year, with high sales of the system and both indie and AAA games. Developers have noted high sales of their games and games that struggled on some platforms have found success on the system. This has reached the point where games like Wasteland 2 are now coming to the system due to the success the Switch has been having so far.

But what is the reason for this success? Well, the answer to that is the fact that the Switch has changed the way people view gaming. As my friend Nelson said, playing  a story game or lengthy RPG typically requires you to sit by a computer or TV while you play. You are stationary and in  a sense, trapped by the game. Sure you can take breaks, but in the end the game can only be played at one spot.

But with the Switch, this is not the case due to the hybrid nature of the system. A long RPG or story driven game becomes something you can play on the go or even in bed. I have spent several nights before going to sleep, just relaxing and playing some RPGs or beat em ups on the system, and as others have noted, the Switch is great for people who travel. A long game becomes perfect for someone taking a flight and needs a distraction, and the sheer amount of games offers variety if people get tired of the game they are playing.

In other words, games that would require a significant time commitment before can now be played in small bite sized portions  and be enjoyed in the way a player sees fit. This also has another effect as well, and that is that people might want to check out even more games on the system that can be played this way. This could very well explain why so many games have found success on the system compared to other platforms. I have seen firsthand, players of fighting games want more of the genre on the Switch so they can continue playing on the go. And as I mentioned at the beginning, developers who wrote off the Switch initially are now getting on board such as InXile Entertainment with Wasteland 2.

The Switch was intended by Nintendo to be a new way to play and it seems that they truly succeeded with that goal. This is a system that has changed the way people view and play games, and is the system for people who are constantly moving, as it offers them a fun way to play as well as giving other gamers a new experience. This really is a system for everyone.

 

Disclaimer: The Above is the opinion of the author and not necessarily that of Real Otaku Gamer or its staff.

 

Check out Nelson’s post here.

By Jonathan Balofsky On 24 Dec, 2017 At 09:49 PM | Categorized As Editorials, Featured, News, NINTENDO, Nintendo Switch, Reviews, ROG News | With 0 Comments

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Christmas is that special time of the year. Its that time when trees are decorated, families gather and exchange presents and love and peace are praised. Well a gift has been given to us all by Inti Creates for this Christmas. Available now and only until the end of Christmas is  Azure Striker Gunvolt Pack Christmas Mode. This is a special bonus mode for the game, and it offers some new challenges, rewards and changes. You should not expect a major amount of content, but instead a clever remix of what was there already.

The new Azure Striker Gunvolt Pack Christmas Mode brings some ideas such as making all the floors slippery, which is explained as the floors being covered in ice.  This forces you to reconsider how you go about the levels, since your strategies before will no l0nger work and the levels require more care. This can admittedly get in the way sometimes, and does feel a bit cheap every now and then. Inti Creates did say this would be challenging but maybe less in some areas would have been even better.

Another massive change, is that the Hexapyle gates will now become Christmas trees and then will rain down presents for you to collection. This is a major part of the mode, and you will be challenged to get as many as you can. These can rain down at surprising times such as during a sequence that may require you to keep moving quickly. The challenge then becomes to get as many of the presents as possible, while still getting through the levels. Its a minor touch that somehow manages to make the game even more difficult but in a very good way for the most part, although the fact that some presents end up obscuring some enemies during certain areas does get annoying and lessens the fun a bit.

Another great thing that this mode changes is that the boss fights become much more somber encounters. Considering everything else in the mode, this is a nice touch and does make a lot of sense, The music helps these encounters and in fact, the music in general has had slight alterations to make everything sound more festive. It is rather amazing just how much effort was put into this brief event.

I may surprise a lot of people by saying this, but I feel this was worth making into DLC and the fact that it is completely free, albeit only available until the end of Christmas, is rather shocking. This is something you really should check out.