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The quirky and off beat shoot em up Ice Cream Surfer will be coming to Switch, PS4 and PS Vita very soon. This was revealed by the developer on twitter.

 

Ice Cream Surfer is a unique shoot em up that is certainly different. Will you be checking this out?

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The console wars are something we have heard for so many years now, but no one can bring a console war like Idea Factory. Now we have among us another game set in an alternate story from the rest of the games in the series like MegaTagmension Blanc + Noire. Most of the cast is present but they don’t know each other, and they have different roles to fulfill as the game progresses, in this game Idea Factory is the main character and always an adventurer.

The Game starts off with a cutscene of Idea Factory ridding her bike avoiding obstacles (and being really cool if I may add) and you see the Goddesses engaging in battle, after that you notice that Gameindustri has transformed into a post-apocalyptic wasteland, while it isn’t explained how exactly that happened, it is clearly a war has destroyed the once beautiful scenery. While I.F. is searching for an ancient library said to contain every piece of the world’s history, she sees what first appears to be a shooting star but is in fact a person falling from the sky. When they found the library, they are greeted by the library’s guardian Histoire, while investigating the library I.F. gets wrapped up in a case where all of the world’s history has been stolen so she must travel through time in order to repair it, and her bike after some mods are used to travel trough time (super cool, kind of a chrono trigger situation).

The game’s mission-based structure is different than what fans are used to. Histoire is once again throwing tasks your way. However, next to each mission is a countdown. As you clear other missions, the timer will start to countdown. If the timer reaches zero, the mission will disappear completely. Each mission holds a level of importance in context to its effect on history on thus the type of ending one will receive. Combat closely resembles previous entries in the series. You move the party member around a set area, then proceed to attack, use a skill, or consume an item. There are also gems scattered around the field that you have to jump up to collect, such as health recovery items, which can be very useful when cornered in a boss fight. By landing hits on an enemy as a party, a Fever Gauge will fill up. Once it’s full, a Rainbow Gem will appear that activates Fever Time (in place of the EX Gauge). This causes the entire party’s stats to increase by 10% and stop enemies from getting a turn. EXE Drives (special attacks) can also be used. Once a turn is over, the amount of Active Gauge used will deplete from the Fever Gauge until it’s depleted, ending Fever Time. I.F. even has her own HDD Form with her “Flame Awakening” state which causes her stats to increase dramatically. All of these mechanics help make battles more dynamic, and for me made the combat to be more enjoyable.

The series good humor and jokes continue are still staple in the series, and one thing that I like is that they don’t take themselves to seriously (see the above image). While fans of the series will find some recycled assets and sounds, the combat and the different challenges in each stage make the replay value higher than your average game. Bottom line SuperDimension Neptune Vs Sega Hard Girls is a fun game, with tons of references to scratch that nostalgic itch and the gameplay is more than satisfactory to help it stand up as its own entry.

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Here is some big news. Square Enix has announced a remake of Secret of Mana for PS4, PS Vita and PC with 3D visuals.

 

Embark on an action-packed, worldwide adventure in the 3D remastered version of Secret of Mana. Take on the role of Randi, a young boy tasked with reviving the magical power of Mana.
The battle for Mana includes many tumultuous encounters along the way; armed with the Mana Sword and joined by his two companions Primm and Popoi, Randi leads the epic quest to battle the treacherous empire as it tries to gain control of Mana.
In order to defeat the forces of evil, Randi, Primm and Popoi must befriend the eight elementals who hold the power that comprises Mana. The legacy of Mana returns as the brave warriors set forth to bring balance back to the world.
The memorable adventure of Randi, Primm and Popoi is reborn in Secret of Mana!

This is amazing news, and while the look may seem a bit unusual, this is a great opportunity for many who haven’t played the classic before. This will be many gamers’ first time playing this and they will get to experience an all time great.

 

Will you be getting this?

Source

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Ratalaika Games sent out the following

 

Developed by Stately Snail, One More Dungeon was the cave exploration action RPG that made its debut on Steam back in 2015 and now thanks to a partnership with Ratalaika Games, it will now be making its way to Nintendo Switch, PlayStation 4 and PlayStation Vita later this year.

 

One More Dungeon is a first person shooter roguelike, with procedurally generated levels and pixel-art graphics.

A roguelike that places you in the shoes of a nameless adventure seeker, whose job is to reach the final level deep within the dungeon and destroy the obelisks that are used by the forces of Evil to invade the world.

Getting there won’t be easy though as lots of enemies stand between you and your goal, but the good news is you can use all kinds of a melee weapons, magic staffs, and antique artefacts to burst your way through them.

 

Features:

 

  • Fusion of old school FPS and Roguelike games.

  • Procedurally generated levels.

  • 30+ types of enemies and 80+ items.

  • Parallel universe with manually created locations.

  • A Sanity level that can reduced by using artefacts acquired in-game.

  • Customisable gameplay in the form of modifiers that can be tweaked prior to playing, to tailor make the gameplay to one of your choosing.

This is an extremely interesting looking game. A combination of pixel art rougelikes and FPS action, this game sounds exactly like what many have been asking for. Will you be checking it out?

 

Source: PR Email

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Idea Factory sent out the following

 

 

Conquer your worst fears and nightmares in Mary Skelter™: Nightmares, Idea Factory International’s latest dungeon-crawling RPG, coming to the PlayStation®Vita system this September 19 (NA) and September 22 (EU)! It will be available as a digital and a physical release and compatible with the PlayStation®TV.
Escape from the living Jail in Mary Skelter: Nightmares for the PlayStation®Vitasystem! Powerful Nightmares actively stalk the player as you run through the dungeon–fight back with the dungeons’ gimmicks or the Blood Maidens’ abilities! Using a turn-based battle system, class changes, a blood-licking transform system, and more, you and your party must solve the dungeons’ mysteries and satisfy the prison’s desires. You just might make it out alive!
About Mary Skelter: Nightmares
The Jail suddenly appeared a number of years ago, sinking the city deep into the ground. There, the Jail had power over eerie creatures called “Marchens.”

Within the prison was a boy named Jack – living a life of suffering, tortured day in and day out, in a world where all dreams, hopes, peace, and humanity had been lost for as long as the people could remember.

Then one day, amidst the darkness that prevailed, a girl who called herself a member of the Blood Team came and rescued Jack from the prison. This marked the beginning of fate – of Jack’s and the Blood Maidens’ escape from the Jail…

Jack and the Blood Team will face countless perils in regaining all that has been lost, to finally escape once and for all!

Key Features
  • Walking Nightmares The dungeon-crawling RPG genre gets a twist when special enemies can chase you through the dungeons! Lay traps to make your escape, or try to take them down!
  • Blood-drenched Transformations! Characters can transform with stronger stats and extra skills, but if they fight too much they may enter Blood SkelterMode, where they go completely berserk!
  • Everyone’s got a Job Strategize your dungeon battles by assigning different classes to your characters, unlocking new skills, stats, and character portraits!

This certainly looks like a unique game. It definitely has a unique charm to it.

You can see a trailer below.

 

By Jonathan Balofsky On 13 Jul, 2017 At 03:54 PM | Categorized As News, PlayStation, Playstation Vita, Portable/Mobile Gaming, ROG News | With 0 Comments

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Sony sent out the following

 

Samurai Shodown V Special is one of the most well-regarded SNK fighting games among the fighting game community. It is easily one of the most balanced games in the series and features both brand-new systems and an extra layer of polish on already existing mechanics. The game is designed to place emphasis on the qualities that are unique to the Samurai Shodown series. With much less of a focus on combos and supers, victory in Samurai Shodown V Special at high level play will usually come down to using range and spacing to your advantage.

There are a variety of systems and mechanics that have contributed to the game becoming a favorite among hardcore fighting game fans. Here is a quick rundown of some of the most important systems:

Sword Gauge: A meter that directly affects how much damage you do. Any attack—even whiffs or blocked attacks—reduces the meter and the amount of damage you can do. It slowly regenerates to maximum when you are not attacking.

Rage Gauge: A staple in the Samurai Shodown series. Taking damage fills this meter and once at max it results in increased attack power along with other bonuses. A Rage Explosion command can also be used which can be used to push back your opponent and open up other possibilities.

Weapon Flipping Attack: The super special move of Samurai Shodown V Special. It can be used while the Rage Gauge is at max or during a Rage Explosion. The move will both deal significant damage to the opponent and disarm them.

Concentration One: Only usable under certain conditions, this move will result in your opponent going into slow motion while you move at normal speed. Combined with the damaging Fatal Flash command that can only be used in this state, this command is perfect for staging last minute come-backs.

Overkill Moves: These are ultimate moves that can only be used once during a match against an opponent who is already on the ropes. Landing this move will result in your character executing the opponent with a brutal, visceral secret technique.

 

The PS4 / PS Vita Release

As with all of our collaborations with Code Mystics, this release will feature new content such as online multiplayer, a Gallery mode with unlockable art, and trophy support. This will be the first time the game has been available in its original form on a modern console. And we are happy to announce that we will be showing a playable beta of the game at our booth during EVO 2017!

We hope all of our fans attending the event stop by to try out the game and give us their feedback!

A true samurai fights with dignity and honor.

But that doesn’t mean you have to.

 

This is excellent news, and following the release of Garou on PS4 and Vita, this author is extremely excited about this news.  The game is one of SNK’s best and the fact that it is getting such a good re-release should have many happy.

Will you be getting this? This author will!

source 

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The following was sent out

 

Every conflict has two sides and Fallen Legion shows the scars of war from both perspectives. In Fallen Legion: Sins of an Empire for PlayStation 4 you guide Princess Cecille and a cheeky talking Grimoire on a quest to restore glory to her crumbling empire. Fallen Legion: Flames of Rebellion for PlayStation Vita puts you in control of her rival, Legatus Laendur, a cunning general leading a coup to overthrow the royal family.

Each epic game in the Fallen Legion saga will retail for $19.99 on the PlayStation Store. Starting today, players who pre-order Fallen Legion: Sins of an Empire for PlayStation 4 will receive a free copy of Fallen Legion: Flames of Rebellion for PlayStation Vita as a bonus game. PlayStation Plus subscribers who pre-order Fallen Legion will also receive a 20% discount. Both Fallen Legion games will launch one week earlier, July 18th, in the Americas. This pre-order bonus will also soon be available throughout Europe where the game will be released on July 25th.

 

Coming to EVO this week? Spencer Yip (Director) and Al Yang (Combat Designer) will be there showing Fallen Legion at the MIX Indie Showcase with an exclusive level made especially for EVO that will not be available in the main game.   The Fallen Legion team is also hosting an indie game panel at San Diego Comic-Con! Panelists include Andy Nguyen from PocketWatch Games, Ian Flood from Yacht Club Games, Persona 5 voice actress Xanthe Huynh, Darrel Delfin, and Metal Gear Solid composer Rika Muranaka. The “How to Succeed as an Indie Game Developer” panel will take place on Saturday, July 22nd at 6:00 p.m. in Room 4.

ABOUT FALLEN LEGION Embark on a personal journey with Princess Cecille and an enigmatic talking grimoire to restore glory to your crumbling home in Fallen Legion: Sins of an Empire for PlayStation 4. Explore gorgeous, hand-drawn lands inhabited by rival soldiers and ferocious dragons. With a team of living weapons at your side, fight enemy hordes and master devastating combo attacks to defeat challenging bosses with the game’s deep combat system.   In Fallen Legion: Flames of Rebellion for PlayStation Vita you control Princess Cecille’s rival, Legatus Laendur, who is leading an army to overthrow the royal family. These stories told on both platforms complement each other to build the rich universe of Fenumia. Rule your Empire between brutal battles and make gut-wrenching decisions that change the fate of your country and your people. Will you blackmail a prince to gain a strength buff or tax a starving village to revive one of your characters? Fallen Legion pushes players to make difficult decisions and witness the consequences of their choices.

  • A Legion At Your Command – Control up to four characters simultaneously, master devastating combos and counter enemy attacks with a well-timed block in Fallen Legion’s unique battle system.

  • Every Choice Changes Your Empire – Players must make split-second decisions to rule their empire. These choices impact the game’s story.

  • Two Experiences, Two Stories – written by Zero Escape: Virtue’s Last Reward editor Ben Bateman, Fallen Legion shows the scars of war from two perspectives in two different games.

  • Talented Voice Acting Cast – Fallen Legion stars Xanthe Huynh (Persona 5) as Cecille and Darrel Delfin as Laendur. Additional voiceover work by Kira Buckland, Jalen Cassell, Alan Lee, and Dorah Fine.

  • Magnificent 2D Artwork From the fangs on our menacing manticore to each sun-kissed brick in Fenumia’s castle, all of the artwork has been hand-drawn to create a stunning world.

 

Fallen Legion looks like an amazing game, and the preorder bonuses are well thought out and done. We will have a review of Fallen Legion sometime soon on the site.

Source: PR Email

By Cataclysmic Knight On 7 Jul, 2017 At 03:57 PM | Categorized As Featured, PlayStation, Playstation Vita, Reviews, Reviews | With 0 Comments

No GravatarUtawarerumono: Mask of Deception was my introduction to visual novels, and I have a minimal amount of experience with anime, but I dove in to the game with some excitement due to the SRPG battle elements. However, as the hours ticked by I learned that I had been deceived myself.


Title:
Utawarerumono: Mask of Deception
Developed/Published By: ATLUS, AQUAPLUS
Available For: PS4 (reviewed), PS Vita

Utawarerumono: Mask of Deception is a stylish 2D game that had a lot of promise and fell terribly short. As a huge fan of Telltale Games and other titles like Life is Strange I really had high hopes for an epic story and an intriguing strategy-RPG battle system. The game began with a protagonist who doesn’t remember who he is or how he ended up where he is. Kuon, a young girl, had helped him out and he soon finds himself in grave danger and saved by her once again. From there the two of them end up working to find out what Haku (the name Kuon has given him since he can’t remember it himself) can do to earn a living, fight wild battles and get wrapped up in all sorts of intrigue.

The first major challenge I came across with Utawarerumono was the fact that the game isn’t dubbed. Every word of dialogue required reading subtitles, which wouldn’t be such a big deal if it wasn’t a 40-50 hour game. The game is also primarily an illustrated book, with static or minimally-animated scenes that change every so often as different characters come in and out of conversations or as scenes change. I was also surprised that, in my time with the game, I only made a handful of decisions. Unfortunately, every single one of those decisions was presented in a hub (within a hotel or camp) and merely let me choose which scene I wanted to see next. These decisions made no difference whatsoever and sometimes even made things worse. At one point Haku told a man named Ukon that he was too tired to do any work and Ukon told him that was fine, they were just going to relax; when I chose the next scene Ukon came to ask Haku to do work! This all occurred in the same night and the flow of these scenes knocked me entirely out of the moment.

The story is also horribly drawn out. I’m okay with a story that doesn’t move at a quick pace, and as someone who has binge watched dozens of entire shows on Netflix it’s something I’m used to. However, Utawarerumono frequently had scenes that should’ve lasted 2-3 minutes and ended up being 20-30 instead. That’s the equivalence of an entire television episode given to Kuon and Haku eating breakfast, with Haku wondering how Kuon can eat so much food and Kuon explaining what the food was and how to eat it! This is done with only a few different static screens showing Kuon sitting there, so it’s not like I was even presented with what the food looked like or shown what Kuon was showing Haku. It also isn’t an occasional thing, it’s the norm; when I stopped playing the game 25 hours in (theoretically half way or more through the 40-50 hour game) I could have summed up the main plot in a few paragraphs, and it certainly hadn’t gotten interesting enough yet to hook my interest. There were teases at a really interesting story, but it was akin to sifting for flakes of gold in mountains of dirt.

Perhaps worst of all, some of the men in the story (Haku especially) are quick to comment on things sexually. While some humorous innuendo or funny situations can really liven moments up, even if they’re sexual in nature, I sometimes felt dirty playing Utawarerumono. This includes commenting sexually to girls who appear very underage, rape comments and blatant crudeness. It went there so often that it became a game for my gal and I to guess when it would happen next, and it almost always went even further than I’d have expected.

The game does have some strategy-RPG battles, but in the 25 hours I played I came across less than a dozen of them. The first didn’t occur until an hour and fifteen minutes passed, and by five and a half hours in I’d only fought three battles. To make matters worse, the tutorial was nearly nonexistent and despite some game history with SRPGs I still didn’t really grasp the deeper elements of the system. Luckily this really didn’t matter as the battles were all so easy that it would’ve been a challenge to lose, and I only had one character knocked out over the course of my time with the game. The game does offer two difficulties, and I went with the standard (easier) one, so it’s worth noting that if you want any kind of challenge and you’re at all familiar with SRPGs you should absolutely go with the harder difficulty mode.

On the upside, I was incredibly surprised by just how polished the game was. The dialogue system is brilliant and allows for automatic or manual progression, rewinding and pausing (including optionally replaying audio). The voice acting sounded excellent although, as I don’t speak the language, it’s hard to be certain. The art, while typically static, is very stylish and detailed. The music is rather fantastic, even to someone who isn’t typically a fan of anime music, and you can listen to music as you unlock it in the game from the title screen. As you progress you can also customize the title screen’s art and look at different art from the game. In the battle system, you can easily go back and replay old battles as well. For a game that’s mostly a book, it’s clear a lot of work went into polishing and perfecting the systems.

I have no doubt Utawarerumono: Mask of Deception will have plenty of fans. The series already has a solid fan base and I’ve heard from numerous people how excited they are to play both games. However, it absolutely wasn’t for me – it dragged on, it required reading subtitles and it barely had any actual gameplay to it. My primary job for years now has been as a book reviewer, so I have absolutely nothing against reading for hours at a time, but a story has to be interesting to be worth experiencing.

Finally, as I previously mentioned I didn’t complete the game. After putting in approximately 25 hours and learning that the game is basically just one-half of the overall story (with the upcoming Utawarerumono: Mask of Truth finishing it) I decided I didn’t need or want to complete it. Some of the information presented in this review – the lack of any genuine choices throughout the rest of the game and the fact that the game is 40-50 hours long, for example – was gathered from other reviews from reputable sources or from information from ATLUS/AQUAPLUS.

Note: I was given a free code for the game (and DLC) in exchange for my honest opinion.

No GravatarE3 week has rolled around yet again and that can mean only one thing:  It’s the perfect time to look at your backlog!

Wait, what?  But Days Gone is coming and there’s  Anthem from Bioware and Destiny 2 and Super Mario Odyssey and The Last Night looks fantastic and and and ad nauseam!  This isn’t when you want to look at old games!  Or is it?  The average gamer has more games than they have time to play these days.  On top of that, the industry has normalized the idea of preordering games up to several years in advance just to get your foot in the door when they come out, even though virtually no preordered titles get under-printed.  So with E3 just getting underway, I thought I’d take a look at all the things I still haven’t played yet…and that’s a lot.

I’ve been collecting since the mid-nineties, ever since I sold my copy of Final Fantasy III for the SNES, decided I wanted to play it again, and then couldn’t find a copy for months.  Ever since then, if I buy a game, I keep it until I play it and decide if I like it.  But in the 90s, games came out much more slowly.  By the time you’d rented the game (yes, you could rent games at a corner mini-mart or video store back then), played it to death, and moved on to something else, the next game you were waiting for still wasn’t out.  That simply isn’t the case anymore.  There are so many games out and coming out that it’s hard to even keep track of what might be interesting, let alone everything that’s been released.  And that’s why backlogs are such a problem.  There are more good games coming out than most people have time to even try, much less play through.  Most people simply buy what looks good, get sidetracked, and end up with a bunch of things they don’t even have time to open.  It’s a ridiculous consumer feedback loop that doesn’t benefit anyone but game companies and retail stores.

For example, I still have Super Nintendo games that I haven’t gotten around to playing yet.  I bought them in the nineties!  It’s a habit that becomes a compulsion; the fear of missing out on the next Suikoden II or Shantae or Panzer Dragoon Saga.  What if you don’t buy it and when you go to get it, you can’t afford it anymore?  But will you ever play it?  Do you even have the time?  Assuming you work a 40 hour work week or go to school full time, you likely have limited time for gaming.  Add a commute, a relationship, or even a child to that equation and you have even less.  You might get three to five hours of game time in a week.  The average game takes around 20 hours to complete.  That’s ten weeks to finish one game, assuming you don’t play anything else or get bored of it.  You might be able to finish five games a year at that rate.  Round it up to ten for people with summers off or extra free time.  But even at ten games a year, you aren’t remotely scratching the surface of what comes out in any given year, and that’s just looking at mainstream titles!  If you have PlayStation Plus or Xbox Live Gold, you get four to six games free every month on top of what you purchase.  If you have Steam, GOG (Good Old Games), Origin, or uPlay, you might get another 5-10 games free a year if you pay close attention online.  That’s well over a hundred games excluding retail purchases if you use all of those services.  At an average of 20 hours each, you’re looking at roughly over 2000 hours of gameplay, and following our formula that says we have five hours a week, that backlog becomes 7.7 years of gameplay.

Over seven years of gameplay just in random titles from online services.  Then we add in the AAA titles that most people buy and tend to play more heavily and the average serious gamer has a backlog of up to ten times what they could realistically play at any given time.  A quick look at my collection made me nearly nauseous when I used this formula.  On Steam alone, I have 1003 games, many of which I have never even installed.  For the PS2?  128.  The DS?  101.  The PS1?  72 games.  That’s over 1300 games and doesn’t include about two-thirds of my collection.  And don’t forget about flash carts.  I have access to every single US and Japanese game for the NES, Genesis, Turbografx 16, and DS.  Thousands of titles.   My Steam library averages out to about 77 years of backlog.  Statistically, I will literally die before I can possibly play every game on my Steam account to completion.  An actual, honest-to-goodness lifetime of gaming is at my fingertips at any given moment.  And yet I still I buy games all the time, but I literally cannot play them.  I’ve talked to other gamers that have backlogs on Steam of up to 3000 games.  It’s almost a status symbol for them.

We don’t need this much media.  But as we buy more and more, faster and faster, we show developers that they don’t need to take their time or fully playtest a game for us to buy it.  Half the time, we stick it on a shelf and don’t get to it for six months.  Or a year.  Or five.  Or even ten.  The situation has degraded so much that there are even sites like www.backloggery.com that allow you to track not only your collection but your completion rate as well.  Steam does this for you automatically, and it can be rather disheartening to see right there in black and white.  I’ve been a Steam member for 12 years and I’ve only managed a 13% completion rate.  However, even that is inaccurate because that number is calculated on the achievements you’ve earned, not the games you have finished.  I wouldn’t hesitate to say that most people don’t end up finishing the games they start these days due to the nature and volume of the market, and it almost doesn’t matter that the developers haven’t properly programmed and playtested those games.

So what does all this mean?  To me, it means the market is utterly flooded; inundated with content ranging from indie games to AAA titles to the point where it’s hopelessly diluted and difficult to have a pure gaming experience.  Very few games end up being memorable and at the same time, we’ve created a sub-culture where people brag about all the items they own but never actually use them.  There are too many games and we can’t play most of them.  A lot of the most highly advertised titles end up being terrible too, due to compromises made to appeal to wider audiences.  Reviews are bought and sold like commodities and it’s very difficult to judge for yourself what might be good.  E3 is the perfect example of this, creating massive hype for titles that test well with audiences and critics, overproduced shows of products that won’t be coming out for some time, and generally driving a multi-billion dollar ad campaign that sucks dollars out of the pockets of hard-working people.  As I write this, Xbox has wrapped up their E3 presentations and already most of the bigger titles are available to preorder on Amazon, even though the release dates are as far away as next fall or later.  Money is flying into the pockets of companies as we speak for nothing more than a promise of things to come drifting on the wind.

Gamers need to stop and think about how excited they were for the items that are already sitting on their shelves when they were announced.  We can’t let that feeling of wonder end the second we get the actual product.  If we all stop to play what we already have, perhaps it will make the industry also reconsider the type of games it is releasing and the volume it is releasing them in.  Having a backlog says a lot about a person, but it also speaks volumes to the way marketing and consumer culture affect us as individuals.  That’s a message many of us need to heed more often.   So take a look at your shelf.  Make an effort to try that game you’ve always been meaning to but were never in the mood for.  You might just recapture the magic in gaming by popping in a hidden gem.  And you might find that the entertainment you’ve been scouring the net looking for is something you already had the whole time.

A Contest And An Addendum

In writing the above article and looking at my backlog, I also realized that in addition to a ridiculously large backlog, I also have a ridiculous number of games sitting about unused on my Steam account and other digital accounts.  These are extras I’ve gotten to give as friends, freebies that came with purchases, and just random extra codes I’ve acquired over the years.  I thought to myself, “What better use could I have for all these games than to give them away to people who will play them?”  And so, The Great Real Otaku Gamer Steam Backlog Contest was born!

For those of you that are interested and want to put in a minimal amount of effort, I’m going to give away my extra Steam codes!  But the rules for winning are something a bit different.  The winners for this contest will be the entrants with the smallest uncompleted backlogs!  After all, in this day and age with everyone oversaturating themselves with media, maybe the person who actually finishes what they start deserves a reward!  So please take a moment and head on over to The Great Real Otaku Gamer Steam Backlog Contest right here on Real Otaku Gamer and drop an entry my way!  You might just win a new game to play…and it might even be good!

By Jonathan Balofsky On 10 May, 2017 At 10:38 AM | Categorized As News, PlayStation, Playstation Vita, Portable/Mobile Gaming, ROG News | With 0 Comments

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Revenant Saga_20170301104043

Kemco sent out the following

 

 

KEMCO proudly announces the release of Revenant Saga for PlayStation® set to hit the North American PlayStation®Storetoday. The game will be made available for PlayStation®4, PlayStation®3 and PlayStation®Vita supporting Cross Buy. Standard price is $14.99, but PS Plus users will have a special 10% OFF discount during the first two weeks! For more information, please visit the PlayStation Store.

Story

After his childhood friend’s parents are stricken with the plague, Albert meets one Dr. Moreau, and agrees to participate in a trial experiment for the promise of a potential cure. However, when the experiment itself proves to be a facade for turning humans into revenants and the Rystorian Order suddenly intervenes, Albert is left with the soul of a demon inside him vying for control of his body. Realizing the same mad scientist who tricked him is also responsible for his childhood friend’s death and many others close to him, he sets out on a journey alone to exact revenge on the man who ruined his life…
However, after crossing paths with revenant hunter slash potential valkyrie, Esther, and being pushed into joining her cause, Albert begins to seriously wonder if or how long he will be able to keep his secret from his new companion. To make matters worse, she has been endowed with the very powers capable of vanquishing those like him!

Stunning 3D Battles

Smooth controls and a fluid camera make 3D battles in Revenant Saga stress free and perfect for PlayStation! In addition, powerful skills with brilliant effects enhance the RPG experience like never before! And with auto and semi-auto functions, battles are as simple as the touch of a button!

Features

What you should know: Revenant Saga will incorporate over 30+ hours of gameplay woven around Albert’s elaborate journey. This includes a variety of unique subquests, in-battle transformation systems, as well as a weapon forging system allowing players to make entirely unique weapons! Also, Revenant Saga will provide an entirely brand new feature to the PS KEMCO gaming experience: players will be able to earn platinum trophies as a reward for progress and effort spent throughout the game!

 

Source: PR Email

 

Kemco’s RPGs , while not the most original, have been great games and a lot of fun.  Revenant Saga looks like it will continue this trend and be a great game to spend time on.